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THE 



LONDON BICYO 




LUB 



GAZETTE. 



AN OFFICIAL RECORD 



OF THE 



^UM, ^acc0, mb (Dtte gaings of the f . §. €• 



VOLUME I. 



DARLING AND SON. 

MINEEVA STEAM PRINTING OFFICE, 86, EASTCHEAP, LONDON, B.C. 

1878. 



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PREFACE. 



Who are they that read Prefaces ? Are they creatures of imagination like the " constant 
reader," the sea-serpent, or the "every school-boy," possessed, as he is, of that vast 
knowledge credited to him in newspaper leaders of the day? Or are they a class apart, bound 
by secret vows and self-inflicted penances to expiate in this sad and weary way those sins of 
ink by which they may themselves be stained ? We know not ; and many as are the odd 
varieties we have met with in a life not unconnected with printers and their works, we never 
came across but one man who shyly confessed that it was his wont, as a matter of pure duty, 
to eat of that thick outer crust which authors caU a Preface. 

Therefore, fellow-members, fellow-writers, and all-too-indulgent readers, when we 
were told that, as there was a First Volume, there must be a Preface, it occurred to us to 
hide in this quiet* comer— sure to be so little seen — those simple acknowledgments which 
the Club may hardly wish to make in the garish light of day. Written, as Prefaces are, 
after the event, it would, indeed, be easy to be wise on the successes and failures (if there be 
any), not only of our little Gazette, but, and this "is far more important, of that body of 
men which is proud, and has, indeed, some fair right tx) be. proud, to call itself the 
London Bicycle Club. Our First Number tells of our aims, of our wishes, and our 
hopes : the verdict of success or failure is not one which we ourselves may pronounce. 
The Gazette is merely a chronicle — a series of signposts, time-tables, milestones, and 
memories — ^written down by the men themselves. What these men have done, and wiU do, 
is the real life of the Club. Though many — ^indeed, most of us — have performed some good 
work in our own time and manner for the L.B.C, and though it be almost invidious to 
single out particular cases where so many have deserved so well, yet, to a man looking back 
on 1878, some few well-known names and figures stand out clearly in our simple history : — 
Keith-Falconer, with his victory over the almost invincible Keen; Appleyard, with 
the Bath Race laurels, not easily forgotten, and less easily matched in the fixture ; 
Coleman, Pollock, Thorn, Wyndham, and Weir, with their many claims to distinction ; 
HuTCHiNGS, who worked for us so wisely, and so well ; W. A. Smith, a name well-known 
to all ; Ward, whose performance is now before us as we read, and many others. 

" Cderes ego quos et amicos, 

Prudens prsetereo." 

And yet there is one more — one name, without which no Londop chronicle would be true, 
for without it would there have been such a chronicle as there is ? — the untiring Captain, the 
best of handicappers, and backbone of the L.B.C, M. D. Rucker. 

With this honoured name we end, knowing full well that, as we have not space for 
all, we have but picked a scanty crop from a field where so much is good, and where there 
is so much promise of more to come. 



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INDEX. 



TOURS, ETC. 

Avranohes to St. Malo 

Bank Holiday Trip 

Bath to AndoYer 

BUokheath to Hayward's Heath, etc. 

Brittany 

Caen to Avranches 

Chatham to Margate 

Circular Kun 

„ „ through Kent 

„ Tour 

Clapton to Folkestone 

Croydon to Plymouth and FiUmouth 

Day in Jersey 

Eahng to Chippenham 

„ „ Frithsden 

East Grinstead to Eastbourne 

East Hants, Notes on Boads in ... 135, 144, 

Easter Run 

Edinburgh by the East, etc 

Few Days in England and Wales 

Hampstead to Winchester, etc 

Havre to St. Malo ... 

Havre to Rouen 

Holiday Ride 

Isle of Grain 

Littlehampton and Bognor 

London to Bath and back 

„ to Dartmouth and back 

„ to Launceston 

„ to Oxford, etc 

„ to Salisbury 

„ to Southampton, St. Malo, etc. 

„ to Torquay and back 

„ to Venice and back 

„ to Worcester 

Mont St. Michel and back 

Nice and back 

One Day*s Ride ... 

Paris Exhibition and back 

Rambles from Wimbome Minster 

Ride through part of Kent 

Ride to Venice 

Rouen to Caen 

Roundabout Rambles 

Solitary Ride 

Ten Days* Tour Round Central England ... 

That Awful Wind 

Thorn's Ride to the North 

Tour, A 

Trip from lille 

Upchurch Marsh 

Wargrave, Marlow, Beaconsfield, etc. 

Weymouth to Bath, etc 

West Drayton to Wallingford 



PAGE 

172 

187 

109 

82 

228 

164 

178 

221 

156 

185 

165 

143 

222 

178 

180 

166 

151, 158, 164, 167, 171 
18 

150, 160, 162 
226 

109, 116, 122 

201,208 

149 

148 

73 

95 

181, 187 

157, 171 

72 

124 

173 

188, 195 

192 

123 

46 

137 

202 

14,23 

200, 210, 212 

178,180 

61 

162,158 

158 

213 

.. 12, 19,23,38,62 

215 

... 102 

177,194 

45 

53 

103,181 

116 

123 

12 



GENERAL INDEX. 



Abercame Fond Race Meeting 
Acrostics ... 93, 104, 126, 133, 189, 168, 
Agricultural Hall Exhibition 
Annual Dinner 

Annual Report ... 

Bath Race 

Bells and Lamps 

Bicycle Union 

Buried Bicyclists 

Buckler ». Hill 

Cambridge U.B.C 

„ r. L.B.C 

Club Uniform 

Club Run to Cambridge 

Distances from Hampstead .. 
Dinner, the Annual . . 

Enigma 

Evening Race Meeting 
Exhibition at Agricultural Hall 

General Meet 

Hampton Court Meet 

Hampstead, Distances fl-om 

Henley, White Hill 

Highways Bill 



190 197 204 
161, 1*86, 189, 196,' 228^ 230 

220 

205, 211, 218 

16 

22,29,65,68,78 

.. ' 141,148 

8,16,106,120 

147, 153,210,217 

59 

62 

170, 199, 206 

37 

206 

17 

205, 211, 218 

201 

130, 142, 159 

220 

102, 106, 117 
.. 9,34,36,38,43,51, 57 

17 

108 

106, 118, 120 



GENERAL INDEX- 

Hon. Sec, Resignation of 

Hon! soit qui nuJ y pense 

Hotels 

Housing Bicycles in Winter 

Kew Bridge Depdt 

Kingston Bye Law 

L. A. C. Races 

Ladies* Challenge Prize 

L.B.C. Races 

Mansion House Relief Fund 

Maps 

Meet, General 

Northampton Case 

N.W. District 

Nottingham, Visit to 

Ode to a Bicycle 

Official Notices .. 2, 9, 22, 37, 61, 

Orchestral Society 

Personal 

Posting of Candidates for Election ... 

Racing Notes 

Reduction in Price of Gazette 

Report, The Annual .. 

Resignation of Hon. Sec 

Social Evenings 

Solitary Voyage of Discovery 

South of England Meet 

Special General Meeting ^ 

Swimming ' 

Tricycles and Bicycles 

Uniform 

Union, Bicycle 

Union Championship 

West District Meets 

„ Runs 

„ Trial 



'Wntinued 

PAGE 

... 169 

169 

7, 18, 66 

169 

4 

170 

87, 68, 62, 66, 102, 219 

121, 142, 191 

81, 85, 130, 142, 159 

183 

74 

117 

113 

117 

179 

167 

67, 86, 89, 99, 100, 121, 142, 
169, 198, 205, 217, 224, 225 

226 

142 

... ' 190 

131 

132 

16 

169 

220,221 

32 

129 

217 

165, 182, 184 

222 

... 37,68 

8, 16, 106, 120 

44,54 

228 

90 

82 



RACE MEETINGS. 



Abercame Fund 

Beckenham B.C 

Bicycle Union Championship 

Brighton B.C 

C.U.B.C. ». L.B.C 

Keen's Amateur 

L.A.C 

L.B.C 

Oxford and Cambridge 
Private Banks C. A; A C. .. 

Richmond C.C. 

Sporting Lift Challenge Cup 
Surrey B.C 



HANDICAPS. 

Civ. Ser. B.C 

L.A.C., 8 Miles 

L.B.C., 1 & 4 Miles 

Private Banks, C. & A. C, 2 miles 

Richmond C.C, 2 miles 

ARTICLES. 

Abuse of Bicycles 

Address to Members 

Buckler r. Hill 

Circular Runs 

Club Runs 

Cydophobia 

Easter 

Eve of the Race 

How to Write an Account of a Ride 

Large Clubs 

Licensed to Elill 

Monster Meets, and should the London go ? 

Mimidpal Bye-laws 

Our President's Opinion on the Grazette 

Roadside Wit 

Stassen at Home 

Why I Learned to Ride, and What Came of It 



202 

191 

54 

128 

206 

184 

87, 66, 102, 219 

85, 159 

61 

94 

46 

209 

36, 193 



181 
62 
81 
90 
88 



... 15 
1, 8, 197 
... 64 
... 71 
... 50 
... 200 
... 29 
... 71 

3 
... 24 
... 114 

4 
127, 134 

3 
... 99 
... 127 

6 



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Vol. L No. 1. 



Teidat, Makch 15th, 1878. 



CONTENTS. 



Address to Members 1 

Official Intelligence 2 

Saturday Runs 2 

Our President's Opinion on the Gazette 3 

How to Write an Account of a Ride 3 

Monster Meets and Should the <* London" Oo ? 4 

Kew Bridge Depdt 4 



Why I learned to Ride and what came of it 5 

Correspondence 6 

Fixtures for Club Runs for the Month 6 

Racing Fixtures 7 

Hotels 7 

Exchange list 7 

Notices to Correspondents 7 



TO THE MEMBERS OF THE LONDON BICYCLE 
CLUB. 

The want of an official organ of communication between 
the Executive of the Club and its other members has been 
long recognised as a serious disadvantage. 

To promulgate notices which refer to purely internal 
arrangements in a journal or journals possessing an unre- 
stricted right of criticism, and published to all the world, 
is scarcely compatible with the proper dignity of the Club ; 
and further, it is hardly fair to compel members to search 
for official intelligence in this or that periodical, and to 
dictate to them in the choice of their literature ; if, indeed, 
they care at all to purch^e papers which deal, for the most 
part, with persons, clubs, and things totally indifferent to 
them. 

At the recent General Meeting circumstances occurred 
which pointed to the advisability of a change in the existing 
means of intercourse between the Club and its officers, and, 
after mature deliberation, your Committee have resolved to 
set on foot a Paper especially devoted to this Club, and 
herewith submit to members the first number of the 

'' y0nb0n §jxstle Club (Sajjettc/' 

If the Gazette meets with the approval and support of 
members, it will be issued every Friday from April to 



September inclusive, and on the first Friday in each month 
from October to March also inclusive. The next number 
will appear on the 5th prox. The scheme of the Gazette 
will be as follows : — 

Outside there will be a brief Index. Then will follow a 
Leading Article ; the Fixtures for Club Runs for the current 
month ; Racing Fixtures, with the Addresses of the various 
Hon. Sees., Entrance Fees, &c. ; Accounts of Race Meet, 
ings ; Date of next Committee Meeting, with Names and 
Addresses of Candidates for Election, and of Proposer and 
Seconder, and all Official Intelligence ; Correspondence, and 
Accounts of Tour/s and Club Rims ; a List of Hotels ; and 
such other matters as may call for notice. 

The Gazette will take the place of the Circulars 
hitherto issued, and will be sent to members gratis. This 
\(dll, of course, entail a considerable expense to the Club. 
Members are therefore invited to purchase copies for friends, 
and so support the paper, which being ^^ for private circu- 
lation only " can be obtained through members alone, except 
upon special application. Particulars are given elsewhere. 

While matters peculiar to the London Bicycle Club will, 
of course, receive chief attention, it will be our earnest 
endeavour to present a readable periodical, and to this end 
we invite contributions upon all matters connected with our 
sport ; but, at the outset, we ask contributors to be careful 
to give a clear statement of roads and distances, and so to 



Pinitir^fl t7Y 



CooQie 



LONDON BICYCLE CLUB GAZETTE. 



enlutnce the value of the Gazette as a work oi reference. 
It is intendei to issue a special Road Index at 1^9 eQ4 of 
the yeir, ani we thus hope to compils a reallyr upduable 
Fade fM^ttm. 

There is one rule which we have laid down wkich we 
must bring prominently before all readers. It is this : no 
allusions direct or indirect of a personal character ^rill be 
inserted without the publication of the name of th« cm^ 
tributor. 

We must, also, call attention to the quotation which we 
have chosen as our guiding precept, and to which, while 
we shall staunchly assert the rights of the Club on all occa- 
sions, we shall adhere to the letter. 

Lastly, we look to this Journal as a means of enhancing 
that esprit d$ corps which has, more than anything else, 
raised the Club to its pre-eminent position. 



COMMITTEE- 

At the last meeting of the Committee, on March 5, the 
following gentlemen were elected members : — 

Name and AddrMB. Frofeasion. Proposer. Seconder. 

Charles Henry Cosens, 
27, Queen's Gate," W. Clerk F.M.WUUmm H.F.O.Htneh. 

John Wilson Potter, 
Carisbrooke, Bedding- 
ton Shipbroker J. Williams, Jr. Cyril J. Tumor. 

Arthur Owen Tylor,"The 
Ferns," Park Hill Road, 
Croydon Clerk J. Williams, Jr. J. S. Tylor. 

Hedley Clarence Yisick, 
1, AbercTombie Villas, 
Hampstead Clerk A. H. Cook Cyril J. Turner. 

Mr. J. W. Alisok was appointed to serve as Captain of 
the N. W. District till the next General Meeting, in the 
room of Mr. £. Teoetmeibb, resigned, the appointment 
being approved by the District in the proportion of two to 
one. 

Mr. James Inwards tendered his resignation of hon. 
membership ,which was accepted. 

Resignations of Membership by the following gentlemen 
were also accepted: — ^Messrs. C. Penrose, R. Burgess, 
H. W. Burgess, H. H. Barclay, E. E. Barclay, W. Halford. 

After some discussion on the advisability of again attend- 
ing a general Metropolitan Meet, it was decided that three 
delegates be sent to the preliminary meeting proposed by 
bhe Pickwick Club for the 19th instant, to report the pro- 
ceedings, and Messrs. Coleman, Rucker, and W. A. Smith, 
vrere appointed delegates. 

It was decided that the Club Gazette be published 
iveekly for six months, from April to September, and 
monthly for the remaining portion of the year, and that one 
copy be sent free to each Member, additional copies being 
supplied to Members at 4d. a copy. 



Mr. A. Oqibb Wjlbd was appointed Editor of the 
Oassttb, and add9d to the Coiunittea. 

Next Committal Meeliiiif-4'uesday, Minrok 19, «t 44, 
l^iBMall. 



SATURDAY RUNS. 

Wbstbbk Distbict. 

Six men, via*, Messrs. Nairn, Bruce, Thorn, Marchant, 
Langmore, and a friend, met at Kew Bridge last Saturday, 
and after waiting some time for the Captain (who was not 
aware that any notice had appeared in the papers to ihe 
effect that a run would be held), rode through Richmond, 
Kingston, Moulsey, Hampton Court and back. They 
reported the roads good, except where the water carts had 
been at work. There was a stiff breeze. 

W. A. Smith, District Captain. 



N. W. Distbict. 

A short informal run was called on Saturday, March 9th, 
the destination being left to those attending. Much regret 
was expressed at the absence of the District Captain through 
indisposition. Ten members and friends started and rode by 
the North road to Potter's Bar, another member meeting 
here; Six returned to Hampstead, the remaining five going 
on to Hatfield to tea at the " One Bell," which they left 
about 9 p.m. for home. 



S.E. Distbict — C. Ditisiok. 

The last of the unofficial winter meets, which have 
proved so successful in this district, was held on Saturday 
last, when seven members took part in the run to Leather- 
head. Roads are rarely in better condition than they were 
then, and an unusual number of riders were seen. The 
only halt on the outward journey was made at the Railway 
Hotel, Ewell, were a party of Wanderers, numbering 19, 
were found resting. After a few minutes conversation the 
G^eys remounted, and on nearing Epsom were met by Mr. 
Heath, who accompanied them to the top of the hill leading 
into Leatherhead. Good accommodation was afforded at 
the '' White Swan,'' and it was not until 8.80 p.m. that the 
homeward journey was commenced. The majority of riders 
carried lamps, and with the wind at their backs, a good pace 
was kept up into Croydon, which place was reached without 
any dismount. Distance of run 27 miles. 
Present— Messrs. M.D. Riicker, jun(Capt.),C.W. H. Dicker, 
A. Herbert, J. W. Potter, J. C. Oswald, Dr. J. Russell, and 
A. Ogier Ward. 

M. D. RucKEB, Jun., Captain. 



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IJONDON BICYCLE CLUB GAZETTE, 



OUR PRESroENT'S OPINION ON "THE 
GAZETTE." 

It lias occurred to several experienced members of the 
London Bicycle Club that it would be to the advantage of 
the members to start a Club Paper ^ and the idea has taken 
definite shape in the present issue. 

There are many advantages which a large body like ours 
will reap from havmg its own organ. Among many others 
the following occur to me. 

(1.) It wiil be a great convenience. The London Bicycle 
Club is a large and somewhat scattered Club. It has not 
and cannot well have any head quarters eaetfy aeceuihU 
to all the members, where notices of runs, races, meetings, 
and the like, can be posted on a notice board. Circulars 
and post-cards sent round to members partially supply this 
want ; but it is evident that if the Club has an organ of its 
own, issued at moderately frequent intervals, much trouble 
and expense may be saved, and the convenience of members 
better consulted. 

(2.) Such an institution will be an additional bond of 
union between the members. Men rally round a newspaper 
as enthusiastically as they do around an individual, and it 
will be so in the present case, and this for several reasons. 
Such a publication will serve to excite and sustain our 
interest in the Club and its doings. We shall know more 
fully and accurately about our general meetings, our com- 
mittee meetings, our race meetings — ^in a word, ahout our- 
eelves. The means of inter-communication between mem- 
bers also will be facilitated. 

(3.) The possession of such an organ, will certainly 
tend to raise the Club in the estimation of outsiders. The 
popularity of the London Bicycle Club will be increased 
and maintained. It will give our Society a higher locue 
itandi in the bicycling world. One prominent club has 
started its own path ; let the London Bicycle Club start 
its own paper. 

(4.) If the paper is ably conducted, as there is little 
doubt that it will be, the general bicycling public may 
wish to read it, (especially if it is not rigidly confined to 
London Bicycle Club news) and the afEair may become a 
decent business speculation. 

(5.) If the Club has its own organ, it will be independent 
of the bicycling preu, which, it is to be regretted, has not 
altogether represented the sport in an impartial or dignified 
manner. It is however pleasing to know that a change for 
the better is being effected in this respect in one of our co- 
temporaries. But supposing that there was nothing to desire 
in the bicycling. papers, it is evidently a desirable thing that 
we should not be altogether dependent on them. 

Certainly, if the scheme succeeds, it will be another 
proof of the prosperity and innate vigour of the London 
Bicycle Club. Iok KxixH-FixooirXB. 



HOW TO WRITE AN ACCOUNT OP A RIDE. 

Everybody does not possess the pen of a ready writer, and 
still fewer are able to keep alive the interest of their readers. 
Half, or more than half, the accoimts which one reads in 
the various journals of the di^ devoted to bicycling are 
wearisome to the last degree. Some excellent advice has 
been given on this subject, but we think that the present 
is a very apt moment for recapitulation. 

First, then, what to avoid. Spills and croppers, and 
disasters to the machine^ are so common that, unless very 
peculiar or serious, they excite no interest whatever in the 
reader; therefore eschew all but the briefest mention of them. 
Unless, indeed, they are due to some peculiarity of the road, 
as the odlitic pavement near Bath, or an unexpected and 
steep descent, such as Westerham Hill. These are points 
of deep interest and real value to the reader and rider, and 
should be carefully noted. Next, avoid all mention of 
" liquors," •* whets," etc. Who cares to know how often 
you find it necessary to ** refresh the inner man," ** oil up," 
etc? Then as to the weather. Unless 'its mention has a 
bearing upon the condition of the roads or .the surrouiiding 
scenery — ^touching which more anon — ^to say that it was 
"awfully hot," and so on, does not excite the slightest 
attention. Recollect that in all accounts of tours, that 
which the reader delights in is, to be taken as it were on his 
own aerial bicycle of thought over the route you followed, 
and to picture before his mind's eye every hill and dale, 
every good and bad road, and every good and bad hotel. 
It is perfectly easy to do all this, and to give an account 
which shall interest not bicyclists alone, but travellers of 
all descriptions, and even friends who do not travel, without 
obtruding the personality of the narrator. 

KOW WHAT TO DO. 

And first by way of exhortation and eneonragement we 
would point out that it is a positive duty to others to warn 
against treacherous roads. Any one can give material help 
who will send the very driest and most technical statement 
of a run. That is what is wanted above all things, and it is 
sheer lasiness to decline. While however pure technicalities 
of distance and surface are invaluable as references, we want 
more than this in a periodical which pretends to be attrae- 
tive. We want readable accounts as well as those which 
will merely swell the Itinerary. 

In an account of any length it is well to append distances, 
hills, turnings, and hotels, in a concise and separate form at 
the end. 

A tolerably graphic account of scenery is always useful. 
First because it stimulates a desire to see for one's-self, and 
secondly because an experienced rider is thus enabled to 
form a very fair idea of the class of roads he will encounter. 



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LONDON BICYCLE CLUB GAZETTE. 



Arcliitectural and archseological features should certamly be 
mentioned, and rivers should not be passed unnoticed, as 
being of interest to bathers and fishermen. In short give 
full details of everything but yourself and your bicycle. 



KEW BRIDGE DEPOT. 

An arrangement has been made with Mr. F. Erwin of the 
" Coach and Horses," Kew Green, for the safe keeping of 
machines and imiforms, and for washing and dressing 
accommodation at the Club expense. The cleaning of 
machines, and drying, &c. of uniforms, if desired, must be 
managed at Members' expense. 

Members who wish it, can lunch there at a reasonable 
rate. 

Although the Landlord will be responsible for the ma- 
chines, it is recommended to Members that each machine 
should be secured with a chain and padlock. 

Nearest stations are Kew Bridge, or Kew, about 5 minutes' 
walk, Kew Gardens about 8 minutes. 

Metropolitan and District Trains go only to Kew Gardens. 

The Dep6t will be accessible at all times within reasonable 

hours. 

. « — 

NOTICE TO MEMBERS. 

Considering the fact that the opening Meets of the Club 
take place to.morrow afternoon, members have doubtless 
felt surprised at not receiving the Meet Cards ere this. Our 
Hon. Secretary has requested us to explain the cause of 
delay in sending these out. It was decided at the last 
Committee Meeting that in order to economise expenditure 
in postage, the Meet Cards should be sent in the same 
wrapper with the Gazette. So many difficulties have how- 
ever to be encountered in bringing out the first copy of a 
Paper that it is later in appearing than was at first 
anticipated. 

The Books containing the Rules and Regulations, 
Report, Balance Sheet, List of Members, &c., will, it is 
hoped, be in the hands of Members at the end of next week. 
The description of cover to be used has yet to be decided on 
by the Committee, who desire that this year the books shall 
be more substantial. 



SiB, — ^It may perhaps interest your readers to know 
that whilst riding through Coombe Wood last Saturday I 
met a gentleman riding a tricycle, and on turning round to 
look at him I perceived a little girl of about five years of 
age seated behind him, and evidently enjoying the situation 
very much. — ^Abobts (L.B.C.) 



"MONSTER MEETS," AND "SHOULD THE 
* LONDON' GO?" 

" No USE " to the first, and " CsBTiLnrLSr not " to the 
second query, I think I hear some of my Club confreres at 
once and unhesitatingly reply. But why ? Why answer so 
hurriedly and without waiting for the arguments in the case ? 

Imprimis : does the " London " desire to be the leading 
Club, or does it not ? If it does not, the matter is at once 
ended ; but this fiat should only go forth as the result of a 
vote of the whole Club taken in Amting. If the " London " 
does desire to be the leading Club, then it must waive many 
little prejudices in order to go with the feeling of the 
majority of bicyclists. There are two Clubs in the Metropolis 
who are in their rules very rigid as to admitting any but 
gentlemen amateurs. The elder of these two Clubs, the 
" Amateur " is comprised mainly of gentlemen approaching 
middle age, or at any rate so far advanced in years as to 
preclude their bding classed as very young men. They have 
decided to take no prominent part in bicycling, and have 
consequently sunk into a highly respectable oblivion. Now 
the " London " by shutting itself off from other Clubs must 
eventually fall behind in a similar manner. Is this to be ? 
It must be remembered that every rid^r, though he may drop 
his aitches or be otherwise undesirable as a companion, may 
have the sport as much at heart and derive as much pleasure 
therefrom as one whose accident of birth and position has laid 
his lines in pleasanter places. I am conservative to the backbone 
in politics, but I certainly believe in treating every man as a 
man ; and consider that no Club, particularly a large, influential, 
and leading Club, should hold aloof from Bicyclists as a body. 
That is the privilege of the unattached. Now as to the de- 
sirability of Monster Meets themselves, I, . personally, and I 
have no doubt almost all the other L. B. Men, experience 
no pleasure in riding in a procession ; but at the same time I 
am fully convinced that until Bicycling becomes a thoroughly 
recognised institution on the highways and bye ways of this 
land, it is most desirable, most politic for us, at any sacrifice, 
to show our strength annually to the new riding section of 
the British public. There is no place where " might " is 
so respected as in England, from our schools upward ; and 
we cannot do better than show our force if we desire to be 
respected. I trust, therefore, that should another Monster 
Meet be held, the ** London " will not hold aloof ; but, sink- 
ing any private feeling for the good of the sport, show, as 
they have done before, the largest number and best dressed 
lot of men at Hampton or wherever it may be held. 

C. W. Naibn. 



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LONDON BICYCLE CLUB GAZETTE. 



WHY I LEARNED TO RIDE, AND WHAT CAME 
OF IT. 

" Where on earth have you been to ? You look as brown 
as a nut." This was the greetmg I received from a burly, 
stolid-featured acquaintance one morning in May, 1875. 
The Burly-one was occupying a comer seat in a London and 
North Western train, into which I stepped after the short 
Whitsimtide vacation. " Been to," said I, " on the tramp. 
Took the train from London to Coventry, and then footed it 
through Kenilworth, Warwick, Stratford, Malvern, &c., to 
Chepstow, and back by train. Awfully jolly trip." My 
friend smiled, and said, " How many days' walk ?" " Five," 
I replied. Well, you must be a fool to walk for five days, 
when you could ride and see all the same places in less than 
half the time. Here have you been a member of the L.B.C. 
for six months, and can't even ride a bone shaker." It was 
quite true, that my burly friend had some time previously 
extracted the sum of 10s. 6d. from me, for some club which 
he had informed me was in course of formation, and wanted 
members connected with other sports, &c., but I had paid 
my money and forgotten all about it. So I said, "My 
ambition is not so lofty, and I find myself quite able to enjoy 
life without either risking my neck or breaking my legs." My 
friend smiled derisively, and said, " Go to Sparrow's, at 
Knightsbridge, and learn to ride, and some day you'll thank 

me." Well, I thought but went and had a lesson, 

and so did a pair of light summer trousers I had on. My 
progress in learning was somewhat slow, and my front wheel 
developed a strong tendency to attack a heap of loose stones 
in the centre of the ground, which invariably brought me to 
grief ; but. cheered on by the brisk twitter of Sparrow, and 
upheld by the sturdy arm of Wood, I persevered, and in due 
time was promoted to the luxurious 44-inch, and my trou- 
bles, as I fondly imagined, were over. To purchase a 
gigantic machine (48-inch) by the Coventry Machinist Com- 
pany was my next step, and behold me moimted for the 

first time on the high road, escorted by Mr. S . Oh ! 

that awful piece of greasy macadam, just by the Albert 
Hall ! How I got over it I never knew, but eventually 
found myself safe at home, but with aching arms and blis- 
tered hands. A few days after the Burly-one called, and 
took me out for a " spin," as he called it. A " spin " it 
might have been to him, but it was sheer hard work for me, 
and I said, *' if this is your boasted bicycling, it is a fraud, and 
I've had enough of it. What will you give for my machine ? 
But an introduction to a smooth gravel road at East Acton 
dispelled my doubts, and I soon became an enthusiast. My 
longest journey had perhaps been some twenty miles, until 
one bright morning the Burly-one called and suggested a long 
ride (just to see how I was getting on). '* Whither away ?" 
I asked. Down the Portsmouth Road, and if you feel pretty 



fit, we may get to Ripley and back. Oh, I said, I know 
Ripley — old-fashioned hotel, large green, good beer and pretty 
girls — I have walked there. Well, we duly arrived at Ripley, 
and discussed some limch, and then the Burly-one wanted 
to know if I was tired, and on my replying in the negative 
suggested a further ride to Guildford, so on we went. When 
we arrived there we agreed to go on to Famham, and not 
knowing the new road we pushed our machines by the side 
of the cemetery to the top of the Hogsback and then rode 
along the grass drive to the turnpike. This about settled 
us for the time being, but once on the top the lovely view 
and splendid road made me forget everything but the 
pleasure, and in due time we reached Famham. '' Bravo," 
said the Burly-one, " you're coming out, thirty-nine miles 
is not a bad ride for a novice." "Thirty-nine miles," I 
gasped out, " how in the name of fortune tim I to get back ? " 
*' Ride," was the laconic reply. " Not up to it, am quite 
played out," I answered. " Oh, you'll be all right after a 
wash and some dinner," and I did feel much better, but my 
knees felt very funny. We rode back through the camps, 
and the roads were heavy. The Burly-one banged his dirty, 
rusty, old '' John O'Groats " along at an undiminished speed, 
and soon left me in the rear. Some of the military 
suggested a tow-line, but their chaff had the effect of re- 
animating me, 

" And that stem joy, which warriors feel, 
In foemen worthy of their steel." 

nerved me for greater exertions, and at last the dirty old 
bicycle and its owner were found outside a small Inn, and 
the latter was putting himself outside a bottle of Bass. I 
did the same and was much refreshed thereby and we 
passed on our way to Bagshot, and just as twilight was 
coming on, and the Glowworms were shining on the mossy 
banks of Shrub HiU, we reached ** The Wheatsheaf." 
The gate was closed, and in trying to dismount by the back- 
bone my fatigued leg caught the rim of the wheel, and I 
took the first of that series of interesting experiments in 
croppers, which I have since carried to such a state of per- 
fection. I found myself doubled up into a knot with the 
machine, and on being extricated the front wheel was found 
to be buckled. I knew not what to do, but the Burly-one 
did, and after he had as I thought brutally illtreated my 
bicycle, the wheel, thanks to the good material employed in 
its make, sprung back. I had had quite sufficient for one 
day, however, and refused to proceed, but was informed the 
charges at ** The Wheatsheaf " were so exorbitant that I 
had better walk on to Egham, whilst the Burly-one rode on 
and caught the last train up from Staines. In due time I 
arrived at Egham and found an Inn called " The Catherine 
Wheel " the landlord of which most hospitably entertained 
me and lent me dry clothes. After some grog and biscuits 



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LONDON BICYCLE CLUB GAZBXTE. 



I went to bed. Oh, tliat fiendish dog in the back yard, how 
I wished I could either shoot or poison the howling brute. 
Whether I slept I know not, but the whole night long a 
constant and neyer ending panorama of hills and dales, 
soldiers and John O'Groats (very rusty) with a burly form 
seated thereon, passed before my eyes, whilst reTolving 
ceaselessly between my legs was a huge "Catherine 
Wheel." 

W. A. SlCITH. 



CORRESPONDENCE. 

Deax Msssbs. The Editobs, 

Understanding that in the Paper started for the 
L.B.C., it is a rule that all contributions are to be signed 
if they contain personal matter, I append my signature in 
due course. I have to bring to your notice a flagrant instance 



of the abuse of Club property. I had the misfortune lately 
to accompany our Captain for a ride, perhaps I should say 
" attend," for I saw more of his back than any thing else all 
day. In the course of time we arrived one after another at 
the brow of Box Hill, overhanging Burford Bridge. Nothing 
would suit my gentleman, but he must ride down the grass 
slope to the very bottom ! Now if you have any control over 
Club property, I beg you to exercise your authority to 
prevent a recurrence of such conduct. The Club has a vested 
interest in his neck, and he has no right to risk Club property 
in such an outrageous manne^. I may add, for the benefit 
of those who conceive the idea of attempting to imitate him, 
that the proprietor of the Burford Bridge Hotel has ordered 
in a supply of stretchers and strait-waistcoats, feeling sure 
that one or other must be requisite. 

Yours, 

A. OOIBB Wuu). 



FIXTURES FOR CLUB RUNS FOR THE MONTH. 



Date. 


N.W. District. 


S.W. District. 


Date. 


March 16th. 


•• Jack Stbaw's Castlb," 4 p.m., 
for Watford. 


Kdtostok Bbxbgc, 4.30 p.m.. 


March 16th. 


March 23rd. 


" Jack Stbaw's Castlk," 4 p.m., 
for Bidge. 


EwEU., 4.30 p.m., 
for Burford Bridge. 


March 23rd. 


March 30th. 


" Jack Stbaw's Castle," 4 p.m., 
for Elstree. 


Subbiton Station, 4.30 p.m., 
for Staines. 


March 80th. 




N.E. District. 


S.E. District (Croydon Div.) 




Msxch 16th. 


Lea Bbidoe Road, 3.30 p.m., 
for Upminster. 


Centbai. Cbotdon Station, 3.45 p.m., 

for Crowhurst, vtd Godstone, meet B. division 

at Westerham. 


March 16th. 


March 2Srd. 


Lea Bbidge Road, 3.30 p.m., 
for Waltham Abbey. 


CsNTBAL Cboydon Station, 3.45 p.m., 
for Burford Bridge, meet S.W. at Ewell. 


March 23rd. 


March 80th. 


Lea Bbidge Road, 3.30 p.m., 
for Brentwood. 


Centbal Cboydon Station, 3.45 p.m., 

for Famingham, meet B. div. at " The Bell," 

Bromley. 


March 30th. 




W. District. 


S.E. District (Blackheath Div.) 




March 16th. 


Kew Bbidge, 4 p.m., 
for Ockham. 


" Habe and Billet," 3.30 p.m., 
for Crowhurst, meet C. div. at Westerham. 


March 16th. 


March 2drd. 


Kew Bbidge, 4 p.m., 
for Pinner. 


" Habe and Billet," 3.30 p.m., 
for Reigate, vid Croydon. 


March 23rd. 


March 30th. 


Kew Bbidge, 4 p.m., 
for Elstree, meet N.W. 


*' Habe and Billet," 3.30 p.m., 

for Famingham, meet C. div. at ** The Bell," 

Bromley. 


March 30th. 



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LONDON BICYCLE CLUB GAZETTE. 



RACING FIXTURES. 

April 27th. — ^London Athletie Club, 4 miles Handicap. 
Entries (28. 6d. Members ; 5s. Non-Members) 
dose April 13, to Wm. Waddell, Esq.,Hon. Sec, 
11, St. Mary Abbott's Terrace, Kensington, W. 

April 27th. — Surrey Bicycle Club, Kennington Oval. 

May 24th. — Cambridge University Bicycle Club, 4 Miles 
Invitation Race. 

KOTICB. 

The List of Racing appointments will only comprise 
those Meetings at which it is desirable for the L.B.C. to be 
represented, but it does not follow that because the announce- 
ment of any particular meeting does not appear, the Club 
must not be represented thereat. The list will be kept as 
complete as possible, but no doubt omissions will occur, 
therefore, in the case of Members wishing to compete in 
sports not in the list of fixtures, rule No. 15 shoidd be 
observed by writing to M. D. Ruckeb, Jun., Captain. 

HOTELS. 
In the early part of last season I proposed that special 
arrangements should be made for the London Bicycle Club 
with the proprietors of the best hotels in all the principal 
towns to which our members are in the habit of riding. 
The idea was, in fact, to form country head-quarters where- 
ever the frequency of visits made it worth while. This scheme 
embraces several important advantages. 

Firstly : A tariff of charges could be compiled by which 
every hotel proprietor, willing to accommodate the Club, 
would be compelled to abide. Members would then be able to 
calculate the extent of their liabilities, and would not be solely 
at the mercy of unprincipled proprietors, as is too often the case. 
Secondly : The uniform of the Club would command a 
certain amount of respect, and as a consequence a better at- 
tention to ordinary comforts. 

Thirdly : And this I consider one of the chief ad- 
vantages. Members would be able to ascertain if any fellow 
Member were in the town, as even if they did not stay at 
the hotel appointed they coidd leave their names and ad- 
dresses there. Under existing circumstances it is not at all 
an unusual thing for Members to be staying in a town at the 
same time, and yet see nothing of one another, in consequence 
of their patronizing different hotels. 

That the suggestion was approved by the Committee is 
shown by the fact of their appointing a Sub-Committee of 
four to carry out the idea. It was, however, no easy task 
for so smaU a number of men to choose hotels all over the 
country ; and the scheme, after lingering for a time, died a 
natural death. Now it appears to me that if it be decided 
to continue this Gazette, with a little assistance we could 
compile a most useful list of hotels before the touijng 
season commences. If each member would kindly send me 



the names of a few hotels in towns frequently visited at 
which they have been well treated, I woidd call a meeting 
of the Sub-Committee, who would at once proceed to make 
die necessary arrangements. It stands to reason that the 
charges at fashionable watering places during the season 
would be higher than those at country towns, and it will 
doubtless be necessary to make two separate . tariffs. The 
hotels catalogued in this issue are merely inserted as an 
e^^ample, (A) denoting the lower tariff and (B) the higher. 
I trust that members will appreciate the benefits to be 
derived from the proposed arrangements, and will render us 
what assistance they, can. M. D. Ruckeb, Jitk., Captain. 

List of Hotels which are subject to regulations and tariff 
of London Bicycle Club : — 



Bath 

Brighton 

Crawley 

Eastbourne 

East Grinstead 

Guildford 

Hastings 

Haslemere 

Maidenhead 



White Lion (A) 

New Ship (B) 

George (A) 

Albion (B^ 

Railway Hotel (A) 

White Hart (A) 
Pier and Sea Side (B) 

White Horse (A) 

White Hart (A) 



EXCHANGE LIST. 

Johnson's Mileage Indicator for sale, suitable for a 56-inch 
machine; never been used. Price 25s. — H. F. Hirsch, 
Oak Lodge, Kilbum. 

53-inch '* Timberlake" for sale. Price nine guineas. — 
Apply to F. M. Williams, 81, Great St. Helen's, E.C. 

For Sale, 54-inch " Special Challenge," with all the latest 
improvements, new last September; in perfect condition. 
Cost £16. 16b.— F. McMillan, 45, Warrington Crescent, 
Kilbum. 

For Sale, a 56-inch Roadster and 56-inch Racer, by John 
Keen, both in first rate order; the latter ridden very little. 
Prices, £10 and £12. M. D. Rucker, Jun., Oakleigh, W. 
Croydon. 

NOTICE TO CORRESPONDENTS. 

All contributions must be addressed to ''The Editor, 
LoKDON BicTCLB Cltjb Ga^zettb, 80, Comhill, E.C.," and 
be written on one side of the paper only ; and, if intended 
for immediate insertion, must be received not later than 
Tuesday morning. 

Any communication containing matters in the remotest 
degree personal, must be signed by the writer, and so appear 
in print ; and in no case will anonymous communications be 
attended to. 

The price of a single copy is 4d., by post 4id. Annual 
subscription, post free, for the thirty-two numbers, payable 
in advance, 10s. 6d. Non-menibers can only obtain copies 
through members; but, if they desire to subscribe, theit 
names must be submitted to, and approved by, the Com- 
mittee, when they will be regularly supplied. The right is 
reserved of cancelling the subscription, upon returning the 
bidance, less the value of copies already supplied at 4^d. 
per copy. 



^^r^^ToH K' 



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8 LONDON BICYCLE CLUB GAZETTE. 

THE BICYCLE SEASON OF 1878. 



For the ninth successive year we have the pleasure of submitting our Bicycle Circular to our Friends and the Public. 

Our specialiti this Season is the substitution of patent weldless steel tube for the solid iron liitherto used in the manu- 
facture of Bicycles. These tubes have been tested to a bursting stress of thirty tons on the square inch of sectional area of 
the metal. 

Our Machines are of four kinds ; the " Gentl^eman's," or Roadster ; the " Club," or Light Roadster ; the 
"Coyentby" Racer; and the "Pony." 

The weights for a d2-inch, including saddle and pedals, are respectively 40-ll)s., 36-^1^8., and 28-^^8. 

The " Club " and " Coyektby " Machines are built entirely of the patent steel tube, which enables us to produce 
Machines combining in a marked degree rigidity, strength, lightness, and elegance. The backbone is oval instead of round, 
whereby increased strength is gained where most required. 

Our great improvement, however, is our patented hollow felloe, which we venture to claim as the greatest advance 
yet made in the construction of the Bicycle. It cannot possibly be deflected by any strain a rider can employ. It is rolled by 
means of specially prepared rollers from a steel tube into a crescent-shape section, the lower part of which is left hollow. 

The steel spokes. (48 in number in the Roadsters, and 52 in the Racer) are fastened direct into the hub, but not in the 
ordinary way. The spoke is drawn to the required gauge (13) leaving a thick end, which is tapped and secured by a patented 
lock-nut. 

A new spring, tested by eminent riders on long journeys, has been pronounced the most comfortable they have ever 
ridden. 

The " Raceb" has ball bearings, the " Club" roller bearings, and the " Gentlemajt's" cone bearings. All bearings 
are steel doubly hardened, and enclosed in a perfectly dust-proof hinged box, which can be readily opened. 

The back wheel, the bearings of which are perfectly dust-proof, runs on double cones adjusted on an improved plan. 
Instead of one fixed and one moveable cone, both are moveable, with a half round bolt running through them. By this means 
it is an impossibility for them to lock, and to adjust them it is simply necessary to tighten or loosen the outside nut. 

We have arranged to use in all our machines " Wiles' " Patent Lock-nuts, which cannot loosen by shaking. 

The " Club " Machine is fitted with a powerful, yet simple, front wheel roller brake, and with a mud cover. 

Whilst adopting the open centre steering for our '' Club " Machine and ''Races" we stiU retain the closed 
CENTRE steering for the " Gentleman's " Bicycle. 

We have made special arrangements for the exclusive supply of a new moulded red-rubber tire, which being perfectly 
round and true, will be found to make the Machine run easily and lightly. 

We have, in all cases, been most careful to produce a low-built, fashionable, and elegant Bicycle. 

We have the pleasure of introducing for the first time a Pony Bicycle, which by the use of a double crank enables a 
man six feet high to ride a 40-inch machine gracefully, and with perfect immunity from danger in falling. 

Our " Gentleman's" Roadster will still be found joar excellence the machine for beginners and rough road riding. 

Our attention has also been given to the production of a Tricycle, which we confidently predict will take first rank 
among the three-wheelers. 

We have now made and sold upwards of ten thousand bicycles, and the long list of customers whose names we are 
permitted to publish, and to whom reference may be made for the quality of our productions, is the best guarantee we can 
give for the past, and the surest incentive to increased exertions in the future. 



Illustrated Prospectus^ containing a large size Photograph of the Club Machine^ free on application. 
HIRE WITH OPTION OF PURCHASE. INSTRUCTION FREE. 



LONDOIf OFFICES— 28, 29 & 30, HOLBOEIf VIADUCT, E.G. 
THE COVENTRY MACHINISTS' COMPANY LIMITED, COVENTRY. 

UifliiizHdJoy 



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FOR PRIVATE OiROULATION ONLY. 



u 

'J'engage done tons d 4viier dans leurs ecriis toute personnalit^, toute allusion dipassant Us limites de la discussion la 

plus sincire et la plus courtoise" — ^Laboulbenb. 



Vol. L No. 2.] 



Edited by A. OGIEK WARD. [Friday, April 5, 1878. 



CONTENTS. 



Address to Members 1 

Bicycle Union !..."."...!!!!!!*.'!!!.!!.! 1 

Official Intelligence '......'..','....'.' 2 

The Metropolitan Meet ........!...................!.....!!.!!!!..!.!! 2 

SaturdayRuns o 

A Solitary Ride .'.'..*!.'.'.;.' .' 5 

West Drayton to Wallingford ...!!.!!...."!.!..!!!!!.!! 5 

AnEasterRun 6 



PAGE 

Exchange List 6 

Racing Fixtures 6 

List of Hotels Recommended 6 

One Day's Ride 7 

Correspondence 7 

Answers to Correspondents 7 

Notices to Correspondents 7 

Advertisements 8 



The first number of the Gazette having met with the 
approval of Members, the Committee has decided upon its 
continuance in accordance with the scheme already set 
forth. On and after this date Mr. A. Ogier Ward assumes 
the editorship, subject to the control of the Committee, to 
whom he will be responsible for the opinions expressed in 
unsigned articles. 

C. R. HuTCHiNGS, Secretary. 



Now that the Gazette is fairly launched we have a word 
to say to Members. 

If everyone is to stand aside to criticise, the paper will 
be a failure. It is not possible for one man to keep it going, 
unless he is prepared to give very much more time to it 
than any honorary editor, who has other business to attend 
to, cah afford. 

Yet we do not wish Members to suppose that every 
petty grievance will be nursed in these pages, or that every 
contribution is secure of insertion, whether carefully written 
or not. The Gazette is intended to promote good fellow- 
ship among the Members, not discord ; and it ought to 
serve the purpose of a dozen general meetings. For 
instance, we venture to assert that the question of a 
monster meet this year and of the Club's attendance 
thereat would have been settled at a single sitting of the 
Committee, had Members been able to express their 
opinions freely. The Gazette will be valuable to the 
Committee, by enabling that body to learn the feeling of 



the Club at large upon all fundamental questions, and it 
should be chiefly valuable to Members by enabling them 
to discuss all such matters at leisure, instead of attempting 
to meet arguments, imperfectly appreciated, in the hurry 
of a general meeting. 

That esprit de corps which is so marked among our 
Members, should teach them to contribute to their own 
Club paper first ; and for ourselves we can only say that, 
having undertaken the grave responsibilities of Editorship, 
and being on the best of terms with all our co-members, 
we shall exercise our functions with the strictest impar- 
tiality, and do our utmost to make the Gazette a credit to 
the Club. 



BICYCLE UNION. 
At a Meeting of the Committee for Kacing it was resolved 
" That the Meeting for the Amateur Championship should 
take place at Stamford Bridge Grounds on 11th May, 1878.'' 
The distances to be 2 miles and 25 miles ; the respective 
winners to be called the long and short distance Amateur 
Champions, and be entitled to a Gold Medal. 

It seems a great pity that the Surrey Bicycle Club meeting 
should have been fixed for the same date as another so 
important a gathering as the April tournament of the 
L.A.C. Both fall on the 27th, as will be seen in the list 
of fixtures, and of course both will suffer in the attendance 
of visitors. 



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LONDON BICYCLE CLUB GAZETTE. 



COMjMITTEE. 

At the meetings of the Committee, on ^arch 19 and 
April 2, the following were elected Members of the Club : — 

Name and AddrcM. Frofcttion. Fropoicr. Seconder. 

Langmore, J. W., M.D., Doctor of 

20, Oxford Terrace, W. Medicine. W. A. Smith C. R. HutchingB 

Parker, Charles Edward, Agent to 

Rose Bank, Dulwich Wi^n Coal 

WoodPark & Iron Co. T. G. NevilL Do. 

Des Voeux, Fredk., 41, Patent 

Finhoro' Road, W Agent. W. A. Smith. Do. 

Trollope, J. R., Kingston 

Hill Place None R G. Trollope G.P.Coleman. 

Johns, Thomas, 6, Bed- 
ford Plaoe, Croydon ... Clerk. J. Williams. \V. Johns. 

Bishop, Alfred, Ringstead 

Lodge, Croydon Clerk. W. R. Bishop. Do. 

Densham, J. L., Fern 

Bank, South Croydon None. Do. Do. 

Bacon, Arthur John, 12, 

Belsize Square, N.W. Engineer. P. Dalton. E. Tegetmeier. 

Henry, Alfred, 32, War- 
wick Road, W. Accountant. E. A. Green. C. Groom. 

At the request of Mr. T. 6. Nevill it was decided to 
place him on the list of active Members. 

With regard to the proposed Hampton Court Meet — 

The Captain having reported the decision of the pre- 
liminary meeting, not to hold a Meet unless the police 
regulations were satisfactory, it was decided that on these 
conditions the Club do attend. 

On account of the late issue of the books it was decided 
to extend the time of entry for Messrs. Millar and Groom's 
prizes to the 14th April. 

It was also decided that the entries for the Bath Road 
Trial should close on the 31st May, and that the Race 
Meeting should be held at Stamford Bridge on the 15th 
June. 

C. R. HuTCHiNQS, Hon. Sec. 



THE METROPOLITAN MEET. 

Another Monster Meeting is to be held, and the London 
is to attend in force. Those who know what a vexata 
quw9tio this has been will, no doubt, be curious to learn 
how the decision has been arrived at, and we think it higlily 
desirable that Members should be fully conversant with the 
facts. 

A number of Club representatives were invited by the 
Pickwick Club to a preliminary meeting, when it was 
decided to hold a Monster Meet this year. Our represen- 
tatives were unavoidably absent, and therefore the Club is 
in no way pledged to the advisability of such gatherings ; 
a point about which as much ink has been shed, and paper, 
and even temper, expended as if the Eastern Question were 
involved. Before the Committee of our Club met to decide 
whether we should go or not, a meeting of delegates, 
appointed at the above preliminary meeting, was held, at 
which it was resolved that the Hampton Court Meeting 
should only be held provided such arrangements could be 



made with the police authorities as would effectually 
prevent the block and breakdown which occurred last year. 
On this being reported to our Committee, it was decided 
that the Club should attend ; and our delegates are fully 
alive to the importance attaching to that condition. 

If an efficient staff of police can be secured, there can be 
little objection to the London assisting, by its presence, to 
promote unity of purpose and harmony of feeling amongst 
the Metropolitan and other Clubs. A very large number 
of our Members would, personally, prefer to spend their 
afternoon elsewhere, but as a corporate body there is 
scarcely any diversity of opinion. If the programme laid 
down can be carried out the Meet will certainly be a very 
pretty sight, and we do not see what harm it can do ; 
whereas the non-attendance of the London might create 
bad feeling amongst other Clubs. We say " if** advisedly, 
for a more difficult task can scarcely be imagined than the 
preservation of order at such a gathering. Here, however, 
we must, and surely can, trust the prudence of the 
delegates. 

In a long file or column the number of men turned out 
by any one Club becomes a very unimportant consideration, 
and one which we can well afford to leave to Clubs who 
have little else to impress the public mind withal. The 
great point for us is neatness, and too much stress cannot 
be laid on this. We would urge Members not to put in an 
appearance at all unless iwfull uniform, and we hope that 
our line will not be marred by such monstrosities as white 
knickerbockers, as on one previous occasion. Spectators 
will infallibly pay more heed to the appearance and bearing 
of a collective body than to the mere numerical strength, 
which can be easily obtained by sweeping the highways and 
byways. 

But after all said and done, and supposing that, having 
called for and obtained police interference, the meeting be 
carried to* a successful issue, we confess to a melancholy 
foreboding, to express which, we will quote a very old 
proverb : " The Horse had a long-standing grudge against 
the Stag, and, to gratify his spite, called the Man to his 
assistance, who, being mounted on the Horse, gave chase 
to, and killed the Stag. The Horse expressed his thanks, 
and requested the man to dismount. * No, no/ said the 
Man, ' I never knew before how useful a drudge you were ; ' 
and the Horse remained a slave the rest of his life." — 
Verbum sap. 

As there is little doubt that the Championsliip Meeting 
arranged by the Bicycle Union will be universally recognised 
as tfie Meeting, and the winners as the champions, some 
change may be looked for this year in the list of honour 
winners ; but we have great faith in our present champion, 
for the shorter distance, and he certainly will not be far in 
the rear. Next week we hope to be able to announce the 
new definition of an amateur, as laid down by the Union. 



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LONDON BICYCLE CLUB GAZETTE. 



SATURDAY RUNS. 

N.W. District. 

March 16tk — There was a good muster for the opening 
run. Fifteen men left " Jack Straw's," and, picking up 
several more at Golder's Green, proceeded by Hendon, 
Kenton, and Oxhey Lane to Watford. Here one or two 
more were found, and 23 sat down to tea at the " Essex 
Arms." After a stay of, about two hours, a start was made 
at eight o'clock for home, by the direct route. The roads 
were found generally very good, and as the afternoon and 
evening were particularly fine, the run was greatly enjoyed. 
In the absence of the District Captain, Mr. Tegetmeier 
kindly undertook his duties. Distance out and home, 29 
miles. Present : Messrs. Buist, Butler, Burroughs, Clarke, 
K S. Curwen, Dalton, GaiTcy, Hirsch, R. V. Jennings, 
Fred. McMillan, N. B. Morris, Newman, Parker, Richardson, 
Sharpe, Tegetmeier, Underwood, Willis, and five visitors. 

March 23rd, — The run of the previous week having been 
so well attended, some apprehension was felt that we might 
prove too numerous for the resources of the little " Guinea," 
at Ridge, but there were, fortunately, not quite so many, 
and notice having been given of our visit we were, as usual, 
very comfortably accommodated. The majority rode from 
Hampstead vid Finchley (where the part of the road known 
as Ballard's Lane is in a shocking state of looseness from 
sewer works) to Barnet, the hill being ridden in good order ; 
thence by Ridge Lane to the " Guinea," arriving at 5.80. 
Leaving again at 7.30, the road through South Mims was 
taken and home reached at nine. Some five or six preferring 
to sit over the fire a little longer remained until about ten. 
Distance 24 miles. Present : Messrs. Alison, Bacon, Buist, 
Butler, Dalton, Fox well. Freeman, Freeth. Hirsch, R. V. 
Jennings, Miller, N. B. Morris, Newman, Sharpe, Teget- 
meier, Underwood, and two visitors. 

March 30th. — ^The extreme severity of the weather on 
Saturday last nearly caused a blank meet, an exceedingly 
rare circumstance in this district. The District Captain 
and ex ditto, however, undeterred by the icy blast, left the 
Heath at 4.15 in the face of a howling wind which rendered 
brake power unnecessary down the steep Colder s Hill. At 
Golder's Green a sharp snow-squall drove them under tlie 
shelter of a friendly shed. This, however, only lasted 
about ten minutes, when it cleared up and turned out a 
beautiful afternoon. Taking the shortest way vid Colin 
Deep, Ektree was reached at 6.45. The view from here 
and from Brockley Hill was magnificent, the air being very 
clear. After tea at the "Red Lion" they returned the 
same way. The roads were surprisingly good and the run 
was really very enjoyable. Distance 18 miles. 

J. W. Alison, District Captain. 

It may be useful to note that the new bridge at Colin 
Deep, Hendon, is now completed, but as the roadway over, 



and for some distance at either end of it, is made of rocks 
of various sizes strewn loosely to the depth of some eight 
or nine inches upon a foundation of bushes, it will appa- 
rently be many years before a bicycle can be ridden over 
it.— J. W. A. 



W. District. 

The run on Saturday the 16th ult. was very well attended, 
eight men showing up at Kew Green. Ten minutes' grace 
w&s given tor absentees. At 4.12 p.m. a start was made 
for Ockham. Richmond was ridden through in single file 
and in good order (plenty of loose stones through the town). 
The king's stone at Kingston had been named as the 
trysting-place for the S.W. division, but they were not 
there, so the West rode slowly on towards Esher. The 
L.B.C. Gazette had, it appears, named Kingston Bridge for 
the S.W. meet, and so the two divisions missed each other. 
The road by Penn's Hill Park, at Wisley, was taken, and, 
turning to the left at Bodystone Hill, Ockham was reached 
at 5.55 p.m. Tea was ordered, and at about 6.20 the 
S.W. division made their appearance, with C. W. Nairn 
in company (his tire had come ofi', and delayed him on the 
road to Kew). It was an hour before tea made its appear- 
ance, and the ''Baronial Hall" was bitterly cold, so the 
men, when it did come, were not long in setting to work, 
and, with some members of the Chiswick Club, pretty well 
cleared the tables as fast as Mr. Porter supplied them. At 
8.10 p.m. the bugler sounded "boot and saddle," and the 
road home was taken vid Cobham Street, and the grand 
" run down " enjoyed by all. At Claremont Appleyard's 
spring broke, which delayed some of the men, and three of 
them having to catch the last train (9.55) from Kew, 
pushed on, and leaving Coleman and Wilkinson at Kingston 
Waterworks, made the pace to Kew, just catching the train, 
having ridden the 18J^ miles in just Ih. 35m. The total 
distance of the run was about 38 miles, and it was much 
enjoyed by all present. Present at run : W. A. Smith, 
F. E. Appleyard, H. W. Bridges, A. H. Koch, E. C. Koch, 
F. Toynbee, — Harrald, C. W. Nairn, J. W. Langmore. 

The first circular run of the season came off on Saturday, 
23rd March. Seven men met at Kew Green, and after 
allowing a quarter-of-an-hour's grace, a start was made vid 
Gunnersbury Lane, Little Ealing, Hanwell Park, and 
Cuckoo, to Greenford — at which place a halt was made to 
consult a map. The route to Northolt and Ruislip was 
then followed over splendid roads, and four miles further on, 
a turning was taken, which would have led the men back to 
Ruislip, and which necessitated another dismount. The 
road to Pinner Marsh was plentifully strewn with new 
stones, so it was decided to go round by College Road and 
Sudbury to Wembley Park. This latter part of the jour- 
ney was much enjoyed, the surface being splendid, and free 
from dust. A capital tea at a most moderate price was 



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obtained at tbe "White Horse/' Willesden — and, after a 
smoke and chat before a cozy fire, the men mounted and 
rode in company to Harlesdeu, where the Captain and 
Hon. Sec. went off to Kew, and the others to their varions 
homes. Every one agreed that the first circular run was a 
thorough success. Distance about 26 miles; speed 
averaged 8 miles per hour. Pace is now made to suit all 
comers ; so the Captain hopes to see a full company at the 
next meet. Present : W. A. Smith (Capt.), C. R. Hutchings, 
W. T. Thorn, H. Qeaver, J. Marchant, W. F. J. Potts, and 
J. W. Langmore. 

March SOtL — Only one man turned up at Kew, and as 
he did not leave his name, there was no recognised run. A 
book will be kept, in future, at the " Coach and Horses," 
Kew Green, in which members are requited to sign their 
names each run they attend. The route next Saturday 
will be vid Osterley Park, Norwood Green, Hayes, Hilling- 
don, and Cowley Street to Iver. 

W. A. Smith, Captain. 

S.W. District. 
March J^^Jri.— The S.W. District met at the "Glyn 
Arms," Ewell. Five Members only presented themselves, 
TroUope (District Captain), the brothers Coleman, and 
Ryan, and a Member of the W. District. Shortly after 
the advertised time of the meet, the Croydon division of 
the S.E. rode up, and after a few minutes' chat, the destina- 
tion was changed from Burford Bridge to Reigate, when, 
after a very pleasant ride, of which the only circumstance 
worth remark was that eight Members rode down Reigate 
Hill, and were very much surprised to find how easy it was, 
they arrived at the " Grapes " and were met by the con- 
gratulations of the Blackheath division of the S.R, who ' 
had already arrived there vid Croydon ; one or two Mem- 
bers having dropped off for various reasons, 18 sat down to 
tea, after which, one gentleman, being elated with the 
strength of that intoxicating beverage, backed himself to 
ride up Reigate Hill and lost his money. The bill being 
settled they all started for homo, the S.E. branching off to 
the right at California for Croydon and Blackheath, and the 
S.W. taking the left-hand road, had a chilly ride home 
across Banstead Downs. 

B. Jbbald Tbollope, District Captain. 

N.E. Division. 
The opening run on the 16th March was not well attended 
in this district ; only seven men turned out at all, and one 
of these had an engagement which called him back early. 
The Lea Bridge Road is unfortunately no better this year 
than it has been before. When the gravel roads were 
reached they continued good as far as Ilford via the Red 
Bridge. Branching off the main road here we tried the 
lanes, which as far as Rush Green proved very bad with 
thick dust and loose stones. From this place to Upminster 
through Homchurch they are good. The " Bell Inn " at 



Upminster is a very comfortable little place and the pro- 
visions good, but notice should be sent the proprietor before 
coming upon him in too great force. We came home 
through Homchurch and Romford and along the high road 
to Ilford, and found the roads in very fair condition. 

March 23rd. — Leaving the Lea Bridge Road at Sybom's 
Corner, we came along St. James Street and into and along 
Clay Street to Hale End, and by Chingford Station, Ching- 
ford Green, and Sewardstone to Waltham Abbey. The 
roads, with tlie exception of one newly gravelled hill, were 
in better condition than usual. Seven rode from Waltham- 
stow to Waltham Abbey together, and two other detach- 
ments arrived later. Some returned to Walthamstow at once 
by daylight, and the rest of the party went home by Enfield. 

March 30th, — One Member turned up at the rendezvous 
and rode about four miles. 



S.E. District. 

16th March. — Saturday, 16th March, had been fixed for 
the first club run of the season, and, although but short 
notice was given of the fact, through the delay in sending 
out of the meet card to members, a fair muster took place. 
Ten members started for Croydon — ^riding vid Godstone to 
Westerham, where five of the Blackheath Division and a 
visitor were met. All then started for Edenbridge, rid 
Cockham Hill, the majority preferring a safe walk down to 
a runaway spill. At Edenbridge, a good tea was served at 
the " Crown," and by 8.30 quite a crowd of yokels had as- 
sembled to see the start made for home. The moon being 
nearly full, a splendid ride was made along the valley to 
Blindley Heath, where some members turned off to sup at 
East Grinstead, the remainder continuing home by God- 
stone to Croydon and Blackheath. Croydon Division. — 
Present : M. D. Rucker, Juu. (Capt.), F. Byers, E. H. Carr, 
J. Franklin, A. Herbert, J. C. Oswald, J. W. Potter, 
Dr. Russell, A. 0. Ward, J. Williams, Jun. Blackheath 
Division.— Present : C. J. Turner (Capt,), G. F. Beck, 
A. W. Barrett, C. W. H. Dicker, J. Kinder, C. E. Law ; 
Visitor, C. Weekes, Beckenham B.C. Distance, 54^ miles. 

March 23rd. — Nine members and a visitor met at Croydon 
and rode to Ewell, where they found four of the S.W. aud 
two of the W. districts waiting at the "Glyn Arms." 
After a few minutes' discussion it was decided to go to 
Reigate, to meet the Blackheath division, instead of to 
Burford Bridge as per meet card. Five Blackheath men 
were found at the " Grapes," Reigate, where tea was pro- 
vided for eighteen, three continuing their ride. Croydou 
division — Present: M. D. lliicker, Jun. (Captain), F. 
Byers, A. Herbert, W. Johns, J. C. Oswald, J. W. 
Potter, A. 0. Tylor, A, 0. Ward, J. Williams, Juu. 
Distance ridden 35 miles. Blackheath division — Present : 
C. J. Turner (Captain), A. W. Barrett, C. W, H. Dicker, 
J. Kinder, E. C. Law. Visitor, T. Johns. 

March 30th, — Wet — ^no run. 



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LONDON BICYCLE CLUB GAZETTE. 



A SOLITARY RIDE. 

Mt summer vacation came upon me unai^ares last year, 
and at the last moment I found myself Tvithout any com- 
panion, and a month's holiday staring me in tlie face ; my 
thoughts naturally turned to my bicycle, and I decided to 
set out in its company. Accordingly, on the morning of 
Saturday the 19th of August, after a dip in the river, I set 
out from Walthamstow, past Hilyer's Corner, and so on in 
the direction of Southgate and Potter's Bar. It was my 
first experience of carrying an M. I. P., and I had some 
misgivings as to whether I could mount and dismount over 
it, in addition to which I had been assured that a " Special 
Challenge " could not, and would not, carry me safe to 
Edinburgh, much less further ; and all these considerations, 
coupled with the solitariness of a month to myself, made 
the first start, over the well-known Tottenham and Wood 
Green roads, not a very inspiriting occasion, in spite of a 
brilliant August morning. My first dismount was a rough 
steep hill just before reaching Potter's Bar, at which 
latter point I struck the Great North Road which was to be 
my companion for the next week or so. A run along that 
very good bit of it which lies between Potter's Bar and 
Hatfield made me feel quite ready for breakfast, which I 
accordingly decided to take at the last-mentioned place, 
but I could find no really decent hotel, and can only warn 
my readers against the imposing and antique-looking 
" lied Lion," for it has all the antique without any* of the 
imposing inside, and I was glad to leave it after a very 
indifferent breakfast and push on northwards. The roads 
were very good, the sun very hot, and the hills very 
moderate, a rather stiff one between Welwyn and Stevenage 
excepted; and passing through Baldock and Biggleswade 
without any noteworthy event I found by the time I reached 
the point where the road diverges for St. Neots (the first 
point, by the way, where York appears on the signposts) it 
was time for lunch ; and as I had ulterior reasons for stop- 
ping there I acceded to the demands of nature and turned 
aside. Here I saw one of the only three bicycles I met 
between London and Edinburgh. A hasty lunch despatched, 
I acted on a hint I had received, and inquired for a 
bathing place. I was directed to the other inn, the Half 
Moon, and there was provided with a light boat and a towel 
and told I might bathe anywhere down the river I liked. It 
was a pleasant change, and one I should recommend all 
riders to St. Neots to avail themselves of ; the expense is 
slight, the river pretty, and very good bathing. My bathe 
and a short stroll about the town completed, I remounted, 
but incautiously tried a sort of back way, instead of returning 
straight to the main road, and soon found I was going astray. 
However, it was only a few miles round and gave me a peep 
at Huntingdon, so, as the roads were good, I was contented. 
Here a little rain fell, and by the time I dismounted for the 
paving of the town it was raining pretty smartly. In Hun- 



tingdon came a difficulty as to roads ; either my pronuncia- 
tion of Alconbury Hill was at fault, or something, and I set 
out on three several and distinct roads, one of which was the 
direct London road, before I was set right and started fairly 
in the direction of the hill. The hill itself I expected to be 
severe, but unfortunately I could not identify it, and was up 
andpastitlong before Ifound out where itwas; then followed 
Stilton, the roads still good but the rain rather increased, 
besides which, as I have since learned, one does not 
generally ride so far after lunch as before^ and therefore, 
when I was fairly through the village and found it was 
after Qve o'clock, I decided to follow the good advice I had 
received, and make my first halt at Norman's Cross, a little 
place which consists of one private house, one inn, and a 
police station, and is situated about a mile out of Stilton. 
The landlady was very genial, and expressed a wish that I 
should " make myself quite at home," an idea which she 
kept up throughout to a rather amusing extent. I refreshed 
myself with a third bath, settled down with a good relish 
to dinner, and turned in tolerably early, mine hostess 
assuring me that it was a bad plan to get up early on 
Sunday, and accordingly naming her own time for my 
breakfast. 

Theo. Godlee, L.B.C. 

(To be corUintied.) 



WEST DRAYTON TO WALLIN6F0RD, 

Via Colnbrook, Slough, Maidenhead, and Reading ; and 
home to London through Henley, Maidenhead, Cratiford 
Bridge, Ilanwell, and Ealing, 

Not having received any notice of the Club runs which 
were to be held on Saturday last, Messrs. Muller, Marchant, 
Freeth, and (Jleaver, four Members of the West division, 
determined to have a short spin in company. 

Meeting at the rendezvous, Paddington Station, the train 
was taken to West Drayton, and at 8.20 we made our 
start. 

The bye-roads which led to Colubrook were splendid, and 
with the exception of a few loose patches near Slough 
(which were all ridden), we had nothing to complain of on 
that score the whole day. 

Our first dismount was at Reading, having done from 
West Drayton to the town of biscuit fame in 1 hour 40 
minutes. Mounting again, we rode over splendid roads 
and through delightful scenery to Waliingford, at which 
place we stayed for dinner, patronising a small inn close to 
the bridge which we can strongly recommend for moderate 
charges. From here we rode to Henley, taking 1 hour 
10 minutes to do the 11 miles, against a perfect hurricane. 
After admiring the view from the bridge for a short time, 
we buckled up our girths and prepared tOsAttack the hill 
leading out of the town. 



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LONDON BICYCLE CLUB GAZETTE. 



I am sorry to say that what with the steepness thereof 
and our old euemy the wind it proved rather too much for 
any <$f us, although we all got up much further than we 
anticipated. 

The run down on the other side was much enjoyed by 
the two " Stassen's," the 56 " Bill" Keen not taking so 
kindly to it. 

From there we continued over the oft-described road to 
Crauford Bridge, where we turned to the left, and being 
ably piloted by Freeth soon reached Hanwell. At that 
village we lost one of our party, viz., the "56 Keen," who 
preferred "training" it to bumping over the macadam to 
Bayswater. ^ 

The others rode on, and all reached their homes before 
8 p.m., after having had a most enjoyable day and taking 
credit for the West carrying out the longest run this season. 

We stopped altogether about 2i hours, leaving a little 
over 9 hours for the 95 miles, and considering the time of 
year and the wind we had against us for the return journey, 
voted it pretty good time. 

The machines used were a 56 " Bill Keen," 58 " Stassen," 
50 " Challenge," and a 55 " Stassen," all of which seemed 
to give the greatest satisfEiction to their respective owners. 

H. V. Cleaver. 



AN EASTER RUN. 



It is not considered desirable to hold any organised Club 
run extending over the Easter holidays, but some Members, 
have decided to repeat the run on Easter Monday which 
last year proved so enjoyable to the few who took part in it. 
It is proposed to ride to Bath in small detachments by 
various routes, and to meet there for a run up in company. 

It is hoped that Members will make such plans for the 
downward journey as will enable them to spend Sunday 
together at Bath. 

I should be glad if those who care to take part in the 
run will kindly write to me, so that I may be better able to 
make arrangements for accommodation, etc. 
I remain. 

Yours truly, 

M. D. RucKEB, Jun., Captain. 



EXCHANGE LIST. 



Johnson's Mileage Indicator for sale, suitable for a 56-itich 
machine ; never been used. Price 25s. — H. F. Hirsch, 
Oak Lodge, Kilbum. 

53-inch " Timberlake " for sale. Price nine guineas. — 
Apply to F. M. Williams, 31, Great St. Helen's, E.C. 

For Sale. My 56-inch Keen's " Eclipse " racer, in per- 
fect condition, goes well on the road ; can be seen at Lillie 
Bridge. Price only JEIO. — ^W. Wyndham, Broke's Lodge, 
Reigate. 



RACING FIXTURES. 

April 27th.— Surrey Bicycle Club, Kennington Oval, 
5 miles Scratch Race— 2 Prizes. Entrance 
fee, 5s; and 4 miles Handicap — 3 Prizes. 
Entrance fee, 2s. Gd. Entrifts close April 1 7th, 
to J. C. Budd, Esq., Hon. Sec, 2, The Ter- 
race, Barnes, S.W. 

April 27th.— London Athletic Club, 4 miles Handicap. 
Entries (2s. 6d. Members ; 5s. Non Members) 
close April 13, to Wm. Waddel, Esq., Hon. 
Sec, II, St. Mary Abbott's Terrace, Ken- 
sington, W. 

May 11th. — Bicycle Championship Meeting, Stamford 
Bridge, 2 miles and 25 miles. Entries 
(5s. fees), to be made to G. W. Beningfield, 
Esq., Hon Sec. pro tern, to the Bicycle 
Union, Grafton Cottage, Hornsey Road, N. 

May 24th. — Cambridge University Bicycle Club, 4 Miles 
Invitation Race. 

NOTICE. 

The List of Racing appointments will only comprise 
those Meetings at which it is desirable for the L.B.C. to be 
represented, but it does not follow that because the an- 
nouncement of any particular meeting does not appear, the 
Club must not be represented thereat. The list will be 
kept as complete as possible, but no doubt omissions will 
occur, therefore in the case of Members wishing to compete 
in sports not in the list of fixtures, rule No. 15 should be 
observed by writing to M. D. Ruckeb, Jun., Captain. 



LIST OF HOTELS RECOMMENDED. 


Bath 


White Lion 


Banbury 


Red Lion 


Brighton 


New Ship 


Crawley 


George 


Eastbourne 


Albion 


East Grinstead 


Railway Hotel 


Guildford 


White Hart 


Hastings 


. Pier and Sea Side 


ft 


"Green's" 


Haslemere 


White Horso 


Maidenhead 


White Hart 


Malvern 


Belle Vuo 


Stratford-on-Avon 


Shakespeare 


Warwick 


Woolpack 



Our men are setting to work in good time, and " the non- 
racing Club " seems likely to belie its name this year again. 
Already Messrs. W. Wyndham, G. F. Beck, N. Whiting, 
J. Williams, C. J. Turner, and others, have commenced 
practice, some at Lillie Bridge, others at Stamford Bridge 
grounds, and from all we hear the pace is satisfactory. 



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LONDON BICYCLE CLUB GAZETTE. 



ONE DATS RIDE. 

K. and W. set off one morning this year from East 
Grinstead. They bumped down the slope to Felbridge, 
and then branched off to Three Bridges and Crawley 
(9 miles). So far, there is only one pull against the collar, 
and that is but short, but its existence is one of those 
things " no fellah can understand." The insignificant exit 
from Crawley on the Horsham road has puzzled many 
riders. It is just above the " George," and care must be 
taken to keep to the left, or else the heedless 'cyclist will in 
time find himself at Rusper and Betchworth. 

The road from Crawley to Horsham (seven miles) is 
pretty but not strikingly so ; but when the stones laid in 
the winter are fairly worn in it will be a bit of road for 
fast travelling. Horsham, which well merits an hour's 
leisure, was a stopping place for a few minutes only ; and the 
two riders were off again for Worthing. Favoured by a 
slight touch of north wind they very easily climbed the 
hill just beyond the toll gates. At the top of this hill 
there stands a large mansion approached by a very hand- 
some avenue. Like many others, they passed this spot 
without pausing to contemplate the view, which ought to 
be superb. Some two miles on, a turn should be taken to 
the left, as directed by a sign post, but our two went 
straight on, and soon lost themselves in a maze of bye-lanes, 
to direct them through which the wits of the " locals" were 
fully taxed. One road was described as "too bad for 
carts !" As the other road proved too rough to ride, and 
yet was described as a good road, we must leave it to be 
imagined what the road "too bad for carts" was like. 
However, the two 'cyclists soon came upon such lovely 
views that they nowise regretted their detour. By-and-by 
the Petworth road was struck, and thence to Worthing was 
plain sailing ; the wind increasing constantly, and hurrying 
them into Worthing at 15 miles an hour. 
(To be continued.) 



HOTELS. 

The subject of Mr. Rucker's letter is very important, 
especially to touring men, who (as it seems to me) scarcely 
get their due share of the benefits of either a Club or a 
newspaper. But there are difficulties to be overcome, 
which will entail some trouble, and demand much care, on 
the part of anyone who may attempt to deal with the 
subject in an exhaustive manner. 

As to Mr. Rucker's " firstly." It will be no easy matter 
to frame a tariff, or even a double scale of charges, which 
will be applicable to several classes of hotels in towns of 
varied character. What may be reasonable at one house 
may be excessive at another not capable of affording the 
same sort of accommodation. Secondly : The Club uniform 
must be well known before it can command more than an 



i^ncertain " amount of respect." Outsiders do not distin- 
guish uniforms all at once. Thirdly : It remains to be seen 
whether members will acquiesce in the selections to be 
made, and stay at " the hotels appointed." In towns of 
any size it may frequently be necessary to select two houses 
at different rates of charges, but this evidently opens up 
several difficulties, and would tend to neutralise the advan- 
tages of the system. 

It is stated that the nine houses mentioned in the last 
list are " subject to regulations and tariff of the Club." I 
have had great reason to be satisfied with some of these 
houses, but if at others our " tariff" is already an accepted 
fact, it would appear to be as yet of a somewhat elastic 
character. 

However, if members generally will use their opportuni- 
ties, and forward all the information they can obtain, very 
much may be done towards the result aimed at, and great 
advantages will be secured. The first thing we have to 
learn is " where not to go." 

Florizel. 
[Though we do not despair of success should the Deputy 
Committee upon Hotels resume their functions, we invite 
Members for the present to contribute the names of 
Hotels at which they have been well treated, without 
reference to the charges. The list in this number is 
compiled from such.— Ed.] 



ANSWERS TO CORRESPONDENTS. 

X. Y. Z. — You will see, on reference to the Notice to 
Correspondents in this number, that it is not necessary for 
the contributor's name to appear in print, but that it must 
be sent as a guarantee of good faith. 

Lost Sheep. — ^Your letter would have appeared had 
No. 2 followed No. 1 with the interval of not more than a 
week, but would be out of place now. 

C. J. — ^You will see from notice in this number tliat your 
letter cannot appear. 



NOTICE TO CORRESPONDENTS. 

All contributions must be addressed to "The Editon, 
L.B.C. Gazette, 35, Eastcheap, E.C," and must bear the 
name of the author, though not necessarily for insertion. 

They must be written on one side of the paper only, 
and, if immediate insertion is desired, must be received not 
later than Tuesday morning. 

No communication of a personal character will be pub- 
lished without the writer's name being appended. 

Copies can be obtained at Goy's, Leadenhall Street, E.C, 
price 4d., or post free at 4jd., on application to the Editor. 

Non-Members may, upon approval by the Committee, 
subscribe for the whole year at 10s. 6d., post free, the right 
being reserved of cancelling the subscription, upon return- 
ing the balance less the value of copies already supplied at 
4id. per copy. 



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LONDON BICYCLE CLUB GAZETTE. 



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AND SUNDRIES. 

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Offered FREE to Officers of all Clubs to arrange Matches, 
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THE BUGLET being but 6 incho by 4 by 2 (oval;. 4 tunu in B flat, Military. 
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H. XEAT ft 80H8, Sole Xaken, Katthiat Bd., London. K. 

The longest and Largest liort Instrument in the SfnaVest dm^pass ever 

made. Used by the Principal Clubs and Bicyclists of ths doi • 

A BOON TO BICYCLISTS. 

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The largest in London. 

Single Lesson, Is. 6d. Perfect Bidingr gruaranteed, 10s. 

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OPPOSITE ALDGATE METROPOLITAN ' STATION, 

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Teacher-Professor T. QUINTON. 

CHAMPION ORNAMENTAL RIDER. 

THE EMPRESS 

Is acknowledged as the best Roadster. Strong, durable, and easy run- 
ning. Always gives satisfaction. Strongly recommended by members 
of Ifondon Bicycle and other Clubs. 

Sole Agent: T. A SMILTiJDALSTON JTrarCTIOK, E. 

THE NORWOOD. 

A newly-designed light Roadster. A very elegant machine. Will 
stand plenty of work. Weight of 52-inch, 40 lb. 
CiTT Aqent : 

>; / 21, LEADENHALL STREET. ) r.__„ pp 
gi 54, LIME STREET, | ^^k^oh, B.C. 

WILLIAM KEEN, 

Empress Bicycle Works, Norwood Junction, S.E. 

Price Lists, One Stamp. 



The BICTCLE of the Day for 1878 is 

J. STASSEN'S "NONPAREIL," 

The only machine fitted with Screwless Spokes, warranted not to break 
or loosen ; patent eccentric brake easily applied and wonderfully effective ; 
new patent double-coned adjustable steering gear ; best red rubber tyres, 
frictionless bearings, and all latest improvements. Every bicyclist ought 
to possess our Patent Circular-wheel Valise. These machines are made 
for work, and are the best and cheapest machines, as they require no 
repairs and never get out of order, and are strongly recommended by 
Members of tlie London Bicycle Club, and by all who have used them. 
Weight of machine, from 40 lb. or from 1 lb. per inch. 

City Agent: GOT, 21, Leadenhall Street 
PEAKES, Princes S treet, Leicester Square, London^ W. 

J. STASSEN & SON, 251, Euston Road, N.W. 

Factory Entrance : BEAUMONT PLACE. 
Prospectus Id., with Photo. 3d. All sizes kept in stock ready for delivery. 

THE PATENT 'HOLLOW FORK 'BIGYCLL 

(The Lightest and Strongest Machines made.) 
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Manufacturers and Amateurs supplied with Roller Plates. 

Inventor, Patentee, and Manufacturer, 

Lancaster Works, Fakenham, Norfolk, 

T. A. SMILY, 

BICYCLE AGENT. 



Agent for Best Bicycles. 



Any Bicycle supplied to order if not in Stock. 

A First-class Bicycle Support (or Map) supplied 
free with each new Machine. 

ALL PRICE LISTS POST FREE. 

Second-hand Machines sold at a Commission of £L Is ; 
if not sold no charge. 



A PHOTOGRAPH of J. KEEN (Champion) 

Free on personal application. 



REPAIRS WELL EXECUTED. 

NEARLY OPPOSITE DALSTON JUNCTION. 



Printed for the Proprietors by Darling & Son, at the Minerva Steam 
Printing Office, 85, Eastcheap, London, E.C.— April 5. 1878. 



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• ■ 

' J^ engage done tons d ^viter dans leurs ecriis toute personnalit^, toute allusion d4passant les limites de la discussion la 

plus sindre et la plus courtoise" — ^Laboulbenb. 



Vol. L No. 3.] 



Edited by A. OGIER WARD. [Friday, April 12, 1878. 



CONTENTS. 



Abuse of Bicycles 

The Bicycle Union 

The Annnal Report 

Table of Distances from Hampstead . 

Saturday Rons 

A Solitary Ride 

Club Run to Ockham 



PAGE 

.. 15 

.. 16 

.. 16 

.. 17 

.. 18 

.. 19 

.. 20 



FAOB 

Racing Fixtures 20 

TheEasterRun 20 

Exchange List 20 

Correspondence 20 

Answers to Correspondents 21 

Notices to Correspondents 21 



ABUSE OF BICYCLES. 

We hear old women, both in and out of petticoats, talk 
of *' putting down bicycles/' and probably there has never 
been any sport or pastime so much abused as ours. That 
there never is smoke without a fire is certainly true in the 
present case, and we propose now to examine into the 
causes of the disrepute into which this grand and useful 
art has fallen. 

The objections of pedestrians are chiefly these : bicycles 
" are noiseless," and "frighten people," they "go too fast," 
" cannot be seen coming," if dusk ; " are dangerous to 
children." 

Those who go in for horses base their objection on the 
one ground, that " they frighten horses," and a serious 
complaint this is. 

It is an undeniable fact that the manners of many men 
on wheels are not what they ought to be ; and people will 
always say, " «r uno disce onmes'* 

It is of very little use, we fear, for us to try to inculcate 
decent behaviour on the part of riders, when we consider 
that the low price of machines puts them within the reach 
of all classes. Moreover, we are decidedly of opinion that 
such advice is not needed by at least the greater number 
of our Members ; but still, there are several points to 
which attention has not, so far as we know, been called. 

One of the daily papers styled bicyclists " self-conscious." 
There is no doubt that the epithet is well deserved, and we 
venture to assert that a large proportion of the, in the eyes 



of non-riders, faults of bicyclists are traceable to this weak- 
ness. The mere fact of balancing, even if it be so habitual 
as not be an " act," is of itself sufficient to require the per- 
sistent and conscious attention of the rider. Then, every- 
body looks round ; young ruffians yell, and throw stones, 
older ruffians gibe and try to drive one into the hedge, and 
most have an unkind word to hurl after the hapless rider, 
who thanks his stars as he turns at last into a green peace- 
ful lane, though he knows what a warm reception awaits 
him in the next village. This "self- consciousness "will 
operate in various ways. In most cases it induces a man 
to show off in some way or other, either in dress, or, more 
commonly among the better class of riders, in speed and 
recklessness. 

This vanity will wear off. Bicycling is in its infancy as 
yet, and when the art has become so widespread as to be 
nearly universal, people wiU no more notice a bicyclist than 
a pedestrian ; and the rider, being perfectly at ease, will be 
able to attend to those little politenesses which would go 
a long way to popularise the art, but which his pre-occupa- 
tion of mind too often causes him to omit. Those who 
then will not learn proper behaviour will, we both hope 
and fear, be taught by the stern percepts of the law. • 

But, in addition to this detrimental self-consciousness, 
nearly all riders forget, to some extent, a very plain fact : 
bicycling is not a sport. We should like to impress this 
indelibly on the minds of all riders. 

Bicycling is not a sport any more than horse-riding is a 



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LONDON BICYCLE CLUB GAZETTE. 



sport. When, therefore, men tear along the roads and 
streets, and blow bugles, and shout, they are as much out 
of place as a fox-hunt in a town. What would be thought 
of men galloping through a suburban district a dozen or 
twenty at a time? They would be set down as arrant 
snobs, and very possibly find their way into trouble. And 
yet there are scores of bicycle riders who rush about at a 
quite equal pace, and get angry with people for not running 
out of the way ; and they would be very indignant if it 
were decreed that no bicycle should travel through popu- 
lous districts at over ten miles an hour. In the comparison 
the horseman has the advantage, for he does at least make 
a good noise, and so give warning of his approach ; but 
bicyclists, including men of classes which should know 
better, are continually met with, carrying no bells or 
alarms, and after dusk no lamps. Is it to be wondered at 
that our art is so abused ? 

Bicycle riding on the roads should be just as distinct 
from bicycle racing as ordinary horse exercise is from the 
Derby, and the aim of those who have the true interests of 
their pastime at heart should be to be as unassuming and 
innocuous as possible. 



THE BICYCLE UNION. 

A full Meeting was held last Thursday, when the defini- 
tion of a bicycling amateur was finally, and, we think, 
satisfactorily settled. There was a certain amount of dis- 
cussion, but eventually the following terms were agreed 
upon: "A professional bicyclist is one who has ridden a 
bicycle in public for money, or who has engaged, taught, 
or assisted in bicycling or any other athletic exercise for 
money. Any person not included in the above definition 
to be considered an amateur." And further, " That any- 
on^ competing ^with a professional for a prize, knowingly or 
without protest (except at a meeting specially arranged by 
the Bicycle Union), shall be considered a professional." 



Members will be concerned to learn that our Captain 
has met with a severe accident. Besides ugly gashes on his 
chin and knee, his wrists are both badly sprained, and it 
will, we fear, be some weeks before he is again able to ride. 
The spill was purely accidental, and may be said to have 
arisen firom thorough confidence in his control of his 
bicycle, the result of long experience. Riding down hill' 
with his legs at rest, he saw loose stones ahead, and dropped 
his feet somewhat incautiously to catch the treadles. 
Their weight, being thrown in front of the fork, proved too 
much for the hind wheel, which flew up, and caused a 
fearful cropper. It only shows that even the best riders 
cannot be too cautious, when we find that so good a rider, 
as Mr. Riicker is admitted to be, comes to grief firom a 
cause apparently so trivial. 



THE ANNUAL REPORT 

Is now in the hands of Members, and forms a very neat 
little book. The Rules are practically the same as last 
year, and we need only call attention to Rules 14, 15, and 
16. That part of Rule 16 referring to footpaths on Club 
Runs might well be incorporated in the regulations for Meets. 

Members should take particular notice of Regulation 2 
upon the prize for most attendances at Club Meets. 

We have also, this year, an interesting record of the 
races contested by our Members, and we may fairly say that 
our Club won its full share of prices. 

Coming to the balance-sheet, we can only congratulate 
Members on the satisfactory financial position of the Club, 
which contrasts so favourably with that of many other 
Athletic Clubs, and altogether we think the little book 
reflects gi^eat credit on the compilers. 

We append the following statistics which have been 
made out from the report by a Member, in the hope that 
they may be of some interest in showing what the different 
districts have done during the past year. 

Except in the list of the number of Men in each district 
Members have been considered as belonging to the district 
in which they were when the last report was issued. 

I. No. of men in each District. 



N.W. ... 
N.B. 

W 

S.W. ... 

S.E 

KoDlitriot 



Honorary Members 
Abeentee Lut 

Total 

II. Racing (v. pp. 16-18). 

Bacing 
Men. Ist 

N.W. 5 ... 2 ., 

N.E 4 ... 5 . 

W 7 ... S . 

aw 4 ... 4 . 

S.E 6 ... S . 

NoDutiiet. S ... 11 . 



4S 
80 
89 
25 
87 
9 

188 

4 
7 

199 



Pbxzbs. 

2nd 8rd 4thtoiath ToUL 

2 ... 2 ... 1 ... 7 

. 8 ... 2 ... 1 ... 11 

. 7 ... 6 ... 2 ... 18 

. 6 ... 2 ... 1 ... 12 

. 8 ... 8 ... 8 ... 22 

. 1 ... ... ... 12 



28 ... 88 ... 26 ... 15 ... 8 ... 82 

III. Of men who rode more than 3,000 miles in the year 
the N.W. and S.E. claim three each and the S.W. and W. 
two each. Three out of the ten had ridden over 3,000 
miles in 1876. 

IV. The road Medab were won as follows: N.W. 3, 
N.E. 2, W. 2, S.W. 1, and S.E. 2. 

V. Distances of over 100 miles in a day. 

No. o£ No. of 

Bidera. Jonmeya. 

N.W. 6 11 

N.E 4 6 

W. 8 6 

S.W. 2 4 

S.B 8 5 



18 



81 



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LONDON BICYCLE CLUB GAZETTE. 



17 



DISTANCES FROM HAMPSTEAD. 

Measured from South end qf Pond, an the top of the 

Heath, by H. Sharpe and J. W. Alison. 



N.E., BT HlGHGATE. 

Mileg. 

Highgate If 

Hornaey Church - - 4 
Tottenham Cross - - 6 
Walthani8tow,Wood-st. 8i 
Lea Bridge Boad - - 9^ 
Woodford, The Castle - 10 j 
Woodford Bridge - - 12 

Chigwell 14 

Abridge ----- I6f 
Chipping Ongar- - - 24 



Abridge 16} 

Navestock - ... 21} 

Woodford Bridge - - 12 
Chigwell Bow - - - 14f 

Woodford, The Castle - 10} 
Epping 18i 

Woodford, The Castle- 10} 
Loughton - - - - 14 

Tottenham Cross - - 6 
Chingford Church - - 10} 



Homsey ----- 4 

EnBdd 9} 

BuU's Cross - - - . n} 
Waltham Cross - - - 13^ 
Waltham Abbey - - 14} 



Highgate - - 
Muswell Hill 
Colney Hatch 
Enfield - - 



Cohey Hatch 
New Southgate 
Southgate . - 
Cock Fosters 
Potter's Bar- • 



Highgate- - - 
Tally-ho Comer 



1} 
3} 

10} 

5i 

6 

7 

9} 

13 

1} 
5} 



N., BY FiNCHLBy Road. 

Miles. 

Oolders Green - - . i^ 
Tally-ho Comer - - 4} 
Whetstone, Cross roads- 5} 
Bamet Church - - - 7} 
South Mims- - - - 10} 
Ridge Hill - - - - 12i 
London Colney - - - 14 
St. Albans, Market 
place 17 



Bamet 7} 

Potter'8Bar,Clockhouse 11 
Hatfield, One BeU - - 16} 
Digswell Hill . - - 20} 
Welwyn Church - - 21} 

Codicote 23} 

Hitchin, Market place - 30f 



Whetstone - 
East Bamet - 
Enfield - - 



5} 
7} 
11 



Whetstone - - 
Totteridge - - 
Bamet Gate - - 
Furze Hill - - 
Boreham Wood - 
Radlett - - - 
Aldenham - - 
Bushey Mills - 
Watford Church 



Potter's Bar 
Northaw - 



- 5} 

- 6} 

- 91 

- 10} 
-11} 

- U 

- 16 

-17} 
-19} 

- 11 
-12} 



Potter's Bar - - - - 11 

Essendon 16 

Hertford 21 



Bamet - - - . 
High Canons Park - 
Shenley - - - - 



Bamet 
Ridge - 



7} 
11} 
13} 

T} 
11} 



N.W., BY Hendon. 

Miles. 

Golder's Green - - - 1} 
Hendon, cross roads - 3 
The Burroughs - - - 3} 
Edgware Road - . - - 5 
Edgware Church - - 6} 
BrockleyHill ... 8} 

Elstree 9} 

Radlett 12} 

Colney Street - - - 14 
Park Street - - - - 15 
St. Stephen's- - - - 16} 
St. Alban's - - - - 17} 

Edgware 6} 

Stanmore 8} 

CkyHill 10} 

Bushey ----- 11} 
Watford Church - - 13} 
Rickmansworth - - - 17} 

Hendon ----- 3 

TheHyde - - - - 5 

Kenton ----- 7} 

Harrow Church - - - 9} 

Kenton ----- 7} 
Rickmansworth - - - 17} 
Amersham - - - - 25} 

Kenton 7} 

Watford Church - - 15 

Hendon ----- 3 

Mill Hill 5} 

Highwood HiU - - - 6} 
Bamet Gate - - - - 7} 
Elstree 10} 



W. & S. W. BT Cbicklbwood. 

Cricklewood - - - - 2 
Willesden Green - - 3} 
Harlesden Green - - 4} 

Acton 7} 

Kew Bridge Station - 9} 
Hounslow, roads diyide 13 
Cranford Bridge- - - 15} 

Longford 18} 

Cobbrook - - - - 20} 

Slough 23} 

Maidenhead bridge - - 28} 
Maidenhead - - - - 29} 



Miles. 

Acton- ----- 7j 

Ealing 9 

Hanwell 10} 

Southall 11} 

Hayes End - - - - 14j 
Hillingdon - - - - 16} 

Uxbridge 17} 

Tatling End - ... 20} 
Chalfont St Peter - - 23 
Amersham - - - - 28} 

Tatling End - - - - 20} 
Beaconsfield - - - - 25} 

Hounslow - - - - 13 
EastBedfont- - - - 15} 

Staines 20 

» 

Slough 23} 

Windsor ----- 25} 

Harlesden Green - - 4} 

Canal bridge- - - »- 5} 

Perivale 8} 

Greenford - - - - 10 

Hanwell Viaduct - - 11} 

Norwood 12} 

Heston 13} 

Cranford Bridge- - - 15} 

Longford 18} 

Greenford - - - - 10 
West End - - - - 11} 
Ruislip ----- 15J 
Harefield- - - - - 19 

West End (Greenford)- 11} 
HilliDgdon - - - - 16 
Crooked Billet - - - 19} 
Westmoor Green - - 21 
Slough 23 

Kew Bridge, Station - 9} 
Richmond Station - - 11} 
Kingston- - - - - 15} 
Esher 19} 



Richmond - - 
Twickenham - - 
Teddington - * 
Hampton Court- 



- 18 

- 16$ 



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18 



LONDON BICYCLE CLUB GAZETTE. 



SATURDAY RUNS. 

N.W. District. 

April 6tk — On Saturday we had what may be tenned 
a " cumulative " Meet. Only three Members left the 
starting point, and found one more, Mr. Freeman, at 
Golder's Green. At Tally-ho Corner the number was in- 
creased to seven, and at Hadley, Mr. Sharman, of the N.E., 
was overtaken. Messrs. Butler and H. Wilson, who had 
preceded the Club, joined at Potter's Bar, and a good pace 
was maintained into Hatfield. Leaving the msichines, and 
ordering tea at the " One Bell," the Members strolled up 
the steep hill, which formed part of the old North Road, 
to the gates of Hatfield House ; and, upon a short parley, 
were admitted into the park, where some little time wag 
spent in contemplating the architectural beauties of the 
fine old Elizabethan mansion. Descending again into the 
town, Mr. Dalton was found to have arrived in a somewhat 
sudorific state, .having started about three-quarters of an 
hour after the rest. Tea having been disposed of, the 
return was commenced at 7.30, and all reached home 
comparatively early. Three men went on to Bedford^ 
arriving there at eleven p.m. The moon, although only 
four days old, was sufficiently developed to be of service. 
The roads, contrary to expectation, were very good indeed \ 
except a short piece near Wrotham Park, and at Potter's 
Bar, where there had been a thunderstorm. Several 
Members who had made up their minds for a muddy ride 
were agreeably disappointed. This is frequently found to 
be the case, and Members would do well to bear in mind 
that the roads a few miles out are often in very good order, 
when the wretched macadam about London is sloppy and 
unrideable. Distance 33 miles. Present : Messrs Alison, 
Buckler, Butler, Dalton, Freeman, R. V. Jennings, Powell, 
Sharman, Tegetmeier, H. Wilson, and one friend (Mr. 
Atkins). 

N.B. — It is hoped that all who possibly oan will attend 
the run to Ockham, on Saturday next. This is the first 
general Meet of the Club ; and Members will greatly oblige 
by making a special effort to be present. It is a very 
pretty ride, and there will be a splendid moon. Some of 
the N.E. men will start with us from " Jack Straw's." Mem- 
bers residing in the neighbourhood of St. John's Wood^ 
Kilbum, and Maida Hill, will probably find it more con- 
venient to assemble in Hamilton Terrace, and ride to 
Harlesden Green, joining those from Hampstead at 4.30. 
John W. Alison, District Captain. 



N.E. District. 

There was a small attendance at the meeting place. Only 
three started ; the number was increased to four at Sybom's 
Corner, and five at Woodford Bridge. Instead of taking 
the direct road to Chigwell, that to Chigwell Row was 
preferred, and found in good condition. Turning to the left 



at the " Maypole " there is a good run down to the Chig- 
well and Lea Bridge Road. Tea at the " Eing's Head," 
Chigwell, and a ride home by Snakes Lane and the New 
Road, brought a very pleasant run to a termination. The 
surface was, as a rule, very good ; but the lower road from 
Snaresbrook to Woodford Bridge is very heavy going just 
now, and the New Road and Snakes Lane will be found 
much better. 

Some Members of this district intend to ride round to 
Kew Bridge on Saturday, leaving the High Cross, Totten- 
ham, at 3.20 sharp, and joining the N.W. at " Jack Straw's " 
at 4 p.m. 

Franois Godleb, District Captain. 



W. Disteict. 

The run to Iver on April 6th was in every respect (save 
one) a success, but only nine men showed up, in answer to 
some 30 noticas which the District Captain had sent out. 
The toute taken was via Brentford, Osterley Park (the 
lower lake was much admired), Norwood Green, Southall 
Lane, Harlington, and West Drayton ; the surface of the 
lanes being very good, except in places which were newly 
stoned. Only one dismount was made for a water-splash. 
One reckless spirit, who seems determined to keep the 
tumbling championship in the West District, came to grief 
here, but no damage was done. A halt of 20 minutes' 
duration was made at Iver, and the men rode by Cowley 
Marsh, Thomey Mill, to Drayton Green, and back via 
Oranford Bridge and the Heston lanes to Osterley Park 
and Eew. A capital tea was provided at ''The Club 
Depot " (by-the^by, the accommodation is so good, that it 
seems a great pity that the men do not patronise it more, 
especially those who live in town). A curious feature of 
this run was, that the distance and times as taken by the 
Hon. Sec. with a Stassen mile gauge, and clocked by two 
watches, was exactly the same by both routes, viz., 13^ 
miles, and 1 hour 40 minutes. Present: W. A. Smith 
(Capt.), C. R. Hutchings, H. Cleaver, J. F. Marchant, 
J. R. Bruce, C. W. Nairn, H. Jennings, F. des Voeux, and 
W. F. J. Potts (visitor). Men are specially requested to 
show up at the general Meet to Ockham on Saturday next. 
W. A. Smith, District Captain. 



S.W. District. 

April 6th. — Five Members mustered at Surbiton Station, 
and, allowing a quarter of an hour's law for late comers, 
rode through Leatherhead, joined the S.E. at Dorking, 
and arrived safely at a very pretty village called Ockley. 
The "Red Lion" was the halting place. After a little delay, 
a very good tea was provided and done strict justice to. 
Three only of the S.W. started on the homeward journey 
at nine o'clock (the other two Members having gone 



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LONDON BICYCLE CLUB GAZETTE. 



19 



straight on from Ockley before tea) ; and leaving the S.E. 
at Dorking, rode back to Surbiton by the same route, 
arriving there about half-past eleven, after a very pleasant 
run. Present : G. P. Coleman, W. J. MuUer, A. H. Rolls, 
St. J. A. Ryan, and R. G. TroUope (District Capt.) 



S.E. DiSTBiOT. — Croydon Division. 

April 6th. — ^Eight Members left Croydon at four o'clock, 
and rode (to Dorking, via Sutton and Leatherhead. At 
Ewell they were joined by two more ; while one who had 
come from Croydon left for Chipstead (F. Williams.) 

The weather was delightful, and the roads in first-rate 
condition. Nearing Ashstead, the Captain and another 
Member unfortunately came into collision, and the former's 
machine was [so much damaged that he was obliged to 
return by rail. At Dorking, the S.W. Division was found 
waiting, and in a few moments the combined Divisions left 
for Ockley Green, a small village lying a little off the 
direct Horsham road. ^ 

Our troubles were not yet over. During the journey to 
Dorking W. Wyndham had shown signs of not being in 
his usual form, having previously ridden to Croydon from 
Reigate, on an empty stomach, and, when within a few miles 
of Ockley Green his strength failed him. Five Members re- 
mained behind with him ; some refreshment was procured 
at a wayside public, but the resources of the place were 
not equal to the production of even a biscuit. One Mem- 
ber here left him, and ran on to Ockley for some biscuits, 
which somewhat revived him, and, with the help of 
another Member, who rode back from Ockley, he was 
partly carried, partly wheeled to the inn. Here a com- 
fortable fire and plenitude of meat and drink soon re- 
stored him, and he was able to return home in pretty 
fair condition. 

At nine o'clock, three Members of the S.W. (TroUope, 
Coleman, and MuUer), and three Members of the S.E. 
(Wyndham, Carr, and Herbert) returned to Dorking, 
where they parted ; the S.W. to Surbiton, and the S.E. to 
Reigate and Croydon. The others took the train from 
Ockley. Present: M. D. Riicker, Jun., E. H. Carr, 
J. Franklin, A. Herbert, J. C. Oswald, J. W. Potter, 
A. 0. Tylor, F. Williams, J. Williams, Junior, and W. 
Wyndham. Distance, Croydon and back, 54 miles. 

S.E. DiSTBicT.— Blackhbath Division. 
April 6tk — ^Three Members started from the " Hare and 
Billet " for Ewell. The roads were very heavy at first, but 
improved after Croydon. A large body of West Kent men 
were met at Beckenham, and fallen in with for a distance. 
At Ewell it was decided to push on to Leatherhead for tea 
at the "Swan." The homeward run was over the same 
ground. Present : C. J. Turner (Capt.), C. W. H. Dicker, 
C. K Law. Distance 48 miles. 

Cyril J. Tubnee (Dist. Capt.) 



A SOLITARY RIDE. 
(Continued,) 

Next morning I woke to the dismal sound of drenching 
rain, not having been called till an hour later than I had 
arranged the niglit before, which was disheartening for my 
second day out. However, as it cleared up a little about 
10.30, I set out on roads which would be good when dry. 
About ten miles from Norman's Cross a sharp turn to the 
right takes you over a curious old bridge into the county 
of Lincoln. From here to Stamford the rain had reduced 
the roads to a very heavy condition ; what they would be 
when dry. I do not know, but the smallest hill seemed a 
labour in their wet state. A fairly steep hill leads down 
into Stamford, passing the Burleigh Gates on the right. 
I rode down pleasantly enough, but once clear of Stamford 
the roads became much worse. They were rutty, and, 
instead of being made heavy by the rain, they were quite 
greasy, so that I felt in imminent peril of falling down at 
any moment, no slight additional labour in riding. This 
state of affairs slightly improved at Colesworth, but when 
I reached Grantham (into which town there is a steep hill 
but very good riding), I felt quite inclined to make a virtue 
of necessity, and keep my Sunday's ride within the very 
moderate limits of 35 iniles. To this view the great 
comfort of the " Angel Hotel " contributed not a little, and 
the rain, which had been intermittent all day, finally 
decided the question, so I spent the afternoon quietly in a 
stroll about the not very interesting town and a visit to 
the old church. I retired early, determined to make up 
for lost time, paying my bill, and arranging to be called at 
six next morning, which indeed I was, but only to hear the 
steady downpour. I decided, however, that it was no use 
wasting time, and with some difficulty got out of the hotel. 
After some further delay I mounted my machine, which 
had been well cleaned for me, and set out for Newark. The 
roads, in spite of the rain, which fell in torrents all the 
way, were good ; and after climbing the first hill out of 
Grantham, which is rather stiff, I had a capital run of 
14 miles, to "The Ram," Newark. It is a commercial 
hotel situated at the further end of the town, and, so far as 
I saw, very comfortable. After a visit to the kitchen fire^ 
to drip and dry, I settled down to a very hearty breakfast 
about 8.30. It was rather luxurious, at a distance of 124 
miles from London, to have, as I had, the Times brought 
in to read at half-past eight breakfast, for it is a privilege 
unattainable in many of our suburban houses. After 
breakfast I looked anxiously at the weather, hoping for a 
change, but as it appeared quite relentless, and I was 
tolerably damp already, I faced it again and pushed 
forward over improving roads in the direction of East 
Retford. Theo. Godleb, L.B.C. 

In last week's issue I see I have accidentally stated that 
I started on the 19th August ; the date should be 18th. 



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LONDON BICYCLE CLUB GAZETTE. 



CLUB RUN SATURDAY THE 13th. 

We hare have been requested to call the attention of 
Members to the run for the 13th inst. to Ockham, and to 
ask them to attend, and so ensure a successful Meet at the 
well-known and popular " Hautboy and Fiddle ;" and, lest 
Members should be deterred by fear of heavy roads, we 
may mention that the Surrey gravel is sure to be in good 
condition, as it dries very rapidly. 



RACING FIXTURES. 



April 27th. — Surrey Bicycle Olub, Kennington Oval, 
5 miles Scratch Race — 2 Frizes. Entrance 
fee, 5s; and 4 miles Handicap— 3 Prizes. 
Entrance fee, 2s. 6d. Entries close April 1 7th, 
to J. C. Budd, Esq., Hon. Sec, 2, The Ter- 
race, Barnes, S.W. 

April 27th. — London Athletic Club, 4 miles Handicap. 
Entries (28. 6d. Members ; 5s. Non Members) 
close April 13, to Wm. Waddel, Esq., Hon. 
Sec., 11, St. Mary Abbott's Terrace, Ken- 
sington, W. 

May 11th. — ^Bicycle Union Championship Meeting, Stam- 
ford Bridge, 2 miles and 25 miles. Entries 
(5s. fees), to be made to 6. W. Beningfield, 
Esq., Hon Sec. |?ro tern, to the Bicycle 
Union, Grafton Cottage, Homsey Road, N. 

May 18tL— Cambridge University Bicycle Club Inter- 
'Varsity Race. 

May 24th. — Cambridge University Bicycle Club, 4 Miles 
Invitation Race. 

KOTICE. 

The List of Racing appointments will only comprise 
those Meetings at which it is desirable for the L.B.C. to be 
represented, but it does not follow that because the an- 
nouncement of any particular meeting does not appear, the 
Club must not be represented thereat. The list will be 
kept as complete as possible, but no doubt omissions will 
occur, therefore in the case of Members wishing to compete 
in sports not in the list of fixtures, rule No. 15 should be 
observed by writing to M. D. Ruckeb, Jun., Captain. 

If J. Keen had lived in the times of the Olympian Games 
no one would have been surprised at his^ successes, his name 
is so remarkable an omen : — J. Eeen=H Nixiy^Victory. 

The Amateur Athletic Club Championship Meeting 
commenced on Thursday, and Mr. Mackinnon, the 
antagonist of Mr. Wyndham last year, went through 
the formality of a walk-over for the Bicycle Championship. 
His time for the four mUes was 14m. 7Ssecs., but this of 
course forms no criterion of his abilities, which favourably 
impressed spectators at last year's meeting. 



THE EASTER RUN. 

Our Captain's accident will preclude the posmbility of 
his taking part in the proposed Meet at Bath, but Members 
are informed that the "White Hart" Hotel will be the 
Club rendezvous in that city, and the proprietor has made 
specially favourable terms, and it is expected that a very 
fair number will start for the run up to London on the 
Monday morning. 



EXCHANGE LIST. 



53*inch " Timberlake " for sale. JPrice nine guineas. — 
Apply to F. M. Williams, 81, Great St. Helen's, E.C. 

For Sale. My 56-inch Keen's " Eclipse " racer, in per- 
fect condition, goes well on the road ; can be seen at Lillie 
Bridge. Price only £10.— W. Wyndham, Broke's Lodge, 
Reigate. 



HOTELS. 

I am pleased to find that one Member has deemed the 
above subject, brought forward by me in our first issue, of 
sufficient importance to write about, although he does not 
altogether with my views. I should like to say a word 
en passant about our Gi^ETTE. It will be impossible to 
carry on our publication without the cordial support of all 
our Members. It is not fair tb expect the Editor to do all 
the work for the benefit of each Member. I would suggest 
that all who have had interesting runs or been connected 
with any amusing or uncommon bicycling adventure, should 
at once write a short account of the same. These our 
Editor could keep by him for insertion whenever be may 
run short of material, and thus avoid the alternative 
necessity of writing until the early morning iiT order to fill 
the paper ; besides, however clever as a writer a man may 
be, too much of his own production in any one paper will 
in time become monotonous. The best way of showing 
appreciation of the advantages derived from our Gazbtts 
will be to give it substantial support. 

To revert to our subject. I quite agree with " Florizel " 
that tourists as a rule do not receive the full benefit of 
either a Club or a newspaper. Let us try, therefore, to 
benefit that class in. this important matter. I freely 
admit that it will be no easy task to frame a tariff, but 
that is no reason why we should not try what can be done. 
It is true that the ordinary charges at hotels of one class 
must necessarily be higher than at those of another, but if 
we can persuade the proprietors of high-class hotels to 
reduce their prices to those of hotels not capable of affording 



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LONDON BICYCLE CLUB GAZETTE, 



21 



the same accommodation in consideration of obtaining the 
regular patronage of all onr Members, few vfonld care to 
patronise the inferior establishments. After all, bicyclists 
do not as a rule go in for great luxuries, but would rather 
prefer simplicity if they could only combine it with comfort 
and cleanliness. Hotel-keepers can, therefore, if they 
choose, agree to a moderate tariff for our moderate wants, 
without making much of a sacrifice thereby. 

'' Florizel " has taken my words respecting club uuiform 
in too literal a sense. Our Club badge cannot b6 mistaken, 
and would serve as a pass at any hotel with which arrange- 
ments had been made by the Club. It might also be 
X)ossible at such hotels to establish L.6.C. visitors' books, 
which would be interestiug to Members on tours. 

As to Members acquiescing in the selections made, I 
think there is little doubt of their doing so, provided it be 
to their personal advantage. If "Florizel" had read my 
letter carefully, he would not have inferred that the hotels 
given in my list were ''subject to the regulations and 
tariff of the Club." I merely gave them as an example. 
All I ask is that Members will send the names of hotels at 
which they have been well treated, leaving the Sub-Com- 
mitt^ to make all arrangements with the proprietors. 
Members need not consider this plan chimerical, as several 
very large hotel proprietors have already expressed their 
willingness to make specially favourable terms for us. 

M. D. RiJCKEB, Junr. 



To the Editor of the London Bicycle Club Gazette. 

Dear Sm, — I am thinking of staying down at Hampton 
Court occasionally during the summer, for a week or two 
at a time, and, weather permitting, intend riding every 
evening from about half-past five or six, and on Saturdays 
from two or three o'clock. I should very much like to 
know of another Member who lives in that neighbourhood 
and feels similarly disposed. Can you help me in this 
matter ? 

TouiB faithfully, 

R Habberfield Short. 

115, Cromwell Road, South Kensington, S.W. 



To the Editor of the London Bicycle Club Gazette. 

Dear Sir, — ^Not being able to leave London before 4.30 
p.m. on the 20th inst., I purpose starting at that time for 
Bath, riding all night so as to reach there about six a.m. on 
Sunday morning. If any other fellow thinks of doing 
likewise, I shall be very glad to be informed of the fact. 

H. V. Cleaver. 

20, Ladfarooke Road, Notting Hill, W. 



To the Editor of the London Bicycle Club Gazette. 

Sir,— I have been a Member of the L. B. C. for three 
years, and think if one belongs to a Club the rules of that 
Club should be respected, consequently I feel bound to 
wear the head gear prescribed by the L. B. G. 

My reason for writing this is to suggest the need of im- 
provement in the coife of the Club. I know the straw hat 
is admissible, but it does not readily mould itself to the 
form of the head ; it also presents a laige surfeice to the 
wind, and is generally considered uncomfortable. 

For the hot weather I would suggest a cork helmet 
covered with our grey, or a soft hehnet ; either would be a 
far greater protection from the sun than our regulation 
cap. 

Trusting some Members of the Club who have felt the 
inconvenience I have expressed may offer useful suggestions 
on this subject, 

I remain, yours, 

April 4th. Anti-Sukstroke. 



ANSWERS TO CORRESPONDENTS. 

C. P.— Thanks. Had intended the alteration. The 
other at present impossible. Due note taken of address. 

C. C. — If it were merely trouble atjiret, Thursday would 
have been selected ; but it is practically impossible. The 
hotels will appear in next published list. 

H. F.— We are surprised at your finding any diflEiculty. 
The distance counts, of course, for the exact, and not 
computed, distance covered by each individual. We 
recommend competitors for the prizes to procure mile 
gauges. 



NOTICE TO CORRESPONDENTS. 

All contributions must be addressed to "The Editor, 
L.B.C. Gazette, 35, Eastcheap, E.C," and must bear the 
name of the author, though not necessarily for insertion. 

They must be written on one side of the paper only, 
and, if immediate insertion is desired, must be received not 
later than Tuesday momiug. 

No communication of a personal character will be pub- 
lished without the writer's name being appended. 

Copies can be obtained at Goy's, Leadenhall Street, RC, 
price 4d., or post free at 4^d., on application to the Editor. 

Non-Members may, upon approval by the Committee, 
subscribe for the whole year at 10s. 6d., post firee, the right 
being reserved of cancelling the subscription, upon return- 
ing the balance less the value of copies afready supplied at 
4^ per copy. 



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LONDON BICYCLE CLUB GAZETTE. 



THE BICYCLE SEASCN OF 1878. 

> mmm < 

For the ninth successive year we have the pleasure of submitting our Bicycle Circular to our Friends and the Public. 

Our speciality this Season is the substitution of patent weldless steel tube for the solid iron hitherto used in the 
manufacture of Bicycles. These tubes have been tested to a bursting stress of thirty tons on the square inch of sectional 
area of the metal. 

Our Machines are of four kinds: the "Gentleman's," or Roadster; the "Club," or Light Roadster; the 
" Coventry" Racer ; and the " Pony." 

The weights for a 52-inch, including saddle and pedals, are respectively 40 lbs, 36 lbs, and 28 lbs. 

The " Club " and " Coventry " Machines are built entirely of the patent steel tube, which enables us to produce 
Machines combining in a marked degree rigidity, strength, lightness, and elegance. The backbone is oval instead of 
round, whereby increased strength is gained where most required. 

Our great improvement, however, is our patented hollow felloe, which we venture to claim as the greatest advance 
yet made in the construction of the Bicycle. It cannot possibly be deflected by any strain a rider can employ. It is 
rolled by means of specially prepared rollers &om a steel tube, into a crescent-shape section, the lower part of which is 

l^t HOLLOW. 

The steel spokes (48 in number in the Roadsters, and 52 in the Racer) are fastened direct into the hub, but not in 
the ordinary way. The spoke is dsawn to the required gauge (13), leaving a thick end, which is tapped and secured by 
a patented lock-nut. 

A new spring, tested by eminent riders on long journeys, has been pronounced the most comfortable they have ever 
ridden. 

The " Racer " has ball bearings, the " Club " roller bearings, and the " Gentleman's " cone bearings. All bearings 
are steel doubly hardened, and enclosed in a perfectly dust-proof lasQiED box, which can be readily opened. 

The back wheel, the bearings of which are perfectly dust-proof, runs on double cones adjusted on an improved plan. 
Instead of one fixed and one moveable cone, both are moveable, with a half round bolt running through them. By this 
means it is an impossibility for them to lock, and to adjust them it is simply necessary to tighten or loosen the outside nut. 

We have arranged to use in all our Machines " Wiles' " Patent Lock-nuts, which cannot loosen by shaking. 

The " Club " Machine is fitted with a powerful, yet simple, front wheel roller brake, and with a mud cover. 

Whilst adopting the open centre steering for our "Club" Machine and "Racer" we still retain the closed 
CENTRE steering for the " Gentleman's" Bicycle. 

We have made special arrangements for the exclusive supply of a new moulded red-rubber tire, which being perfectly 
round and true will be found to make the Machine run easily and lightly. 

We have, in all cases, been most careful to produce a low-built, fashionable, and elegant Bicycle. 

We have the pleasure of introducing for the first time a Pony Bicycle, which, by the use of a double crank, enables 
a man six feet high to ride a 40'inch Machine gracefully, and with perfect immunity from danger in falling. 

Our " Gentleman's " Roadster will still be found par excellence the Machine for beginners and rough road riding. 

Our attention has also been given to the production of a Tricycle, which we confidently predict will take first rank 
among the three-wheelers. 

We have now made and sold upwards of ten thousand Bicycles, and the long list of customers whose names we are 
permitted to publish, and to whom reference may be made for the quality of our productions, is the best guarantee we can 
give for the past and the surest incentive to increased exertions in the future. 



ILLUSTRATED PROSPECTUS, CONTAINING A LARGE SIZE PHOTOGRAPH OF THE CLUB MACHINE, FREE ON APPLICATION. 
HIRE WITH OPTION OP PURCHASE. INSTRUCTION FREE. 



LONDON OFFICES -28, 29, & 30, HOLB ORN VIADUCT, LG. 

THE COVENTRY MACHINISTS' COMPANY LIMITED, COVENTRY, 

Pxinted and Published by Dablino & Soir, at the Minerva Steam Printing Office, 85, Eastcheap, London, E.O.— April 25, 1878. 

G005l( 



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'^J^engage done tous ct 4viter dans leurs ecrits toute personnalit^, toute allus^ion dSpasmnt les limites de la discussion la 

plus sincire et la plus courtoise.** — ^Laboulbenb. 



Vol. I. No. 8.] 



Edited by A. OGIER WARD. [Thursday, May 16, 1878. 



CONTENTS, 

PAGB 



Club BtULB..... 

The Hampton' Court Meet ... 

Committee 

A Solitary Bide (Condaded) 

A Trip from Lille 

L.A.C. Sports 

Saturday Rons 



60 
51 
51 
52 
58 
53 
54 



FAQE 



Bicycle Union ChampionBhip 54 

Exchange List 55 

Hotels , 56 

London Bicycle Club Meets 56 

Racing Fixtures 66 

Correspondence 56 

Notices to Correspondents 56 



CLUB RUNS. 

There has been a fairly strong expression of opinion 
upon this topic in these columns, and still stronger expres- 
sions have come to our ears. The general idea seems to 
be that a pace moderate to slow should be maintained 
throughout^ and that a rearman is as indispensable as a 
leader. 

At the same time it is beyond question that a speed which 
is unattainable by one or two is intolerably slow to some 
riders, especially to men who may be anxiously preparing 
for an event such as the Bath Race. These last haye a 
certain right to consideration. They say, with a good deal 
of truth, " We join the runs to support good fellowship 
amongst members, but we cannot undertake to drone along 
the road like a funeral procession." The slow men say, 
" We ride for good fellowship, etc., but see very little fun 
in tearing along at a pace which renders enjoyment and 
conversation impossible." We would suggest a plan which 
we think capable of reconciling these two parties. Let the 
men, after meeting, separate into two divisions. Their 
destination is the same, and the hour of tea would be the 
same. Then those who desire a speedy run can choose 
their own pace, and, arriving early at the halting-place, 
order tea to be ready at a certain time. The others, who 
prefer the enjoyment of the scenery to top speed, can jog 
along quietly, and, on arrival, will find their meal in a fair 
way towards a settlement. Those who know what it is to 
rush into some small wayside inn and learn that nothing 
can be obtained for an hour, when, but for this or that 



accident to some comparative novice, they might have 
given all necessary notice, will appreciate some such 
arrangement. 

This suggestion has, we venture to think, another 
material advantage attached to it. If a meet is of any 
magnitude the number of men present becomes a serious 
drawback to comfort and security. At any moment those 
in front may find some novice, who cannot tread back, 
rushing down hill upon them at the risk of their necks as 
well as his own, and delays and mishaps are apparently so 
inevitable that nearly all men will admit that they prefer 
riding with a small to a large detachment. 

And further, as communication is necessarily confined to 
only a few members while on the run, we do not see what 
is gained by compelling all the men to ride together. For 
social purposes the tea and chat afterwards are the great 
desiderata. The other main purpose for which Club runs 
are organised is to afford novices an opportunity of learning 
by the experience of others, and the absence of " flyers " is 
no loss to them, but rather a gain, while on the road. We 
tope to see this subject ventilated a little, for something 
must be done to put a stop to the too frequent complaints 
which are now heard. 



Members are reminded that all subscriptions are due at 
the beginning of the year, and those who have not yet paid 
are requested to send the amount to the Treasurer, 

Francis Godlee, Whip's Cross, Walthamstow. 



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LONDON BICYCLE CLUB GAZETTE- 



poachers. The magistrates are game preservers, and the 
magistrates keep spirited horses, and when there is a doubt, 
as in the present case, the benefit of it goes to the coach- 
man and game preserver. 

There is but one course to take, and until that course is 
taken, bicyclists are not a community. The Union must 
take up such cases. We are speaking in our own name, 
and not in that of the Committee. If the Union will not 
act, then some Association must be formed which will. 
Bicyclists may rely upon it that they will never meet with 
substantial justice till they show themselves to be a strong 
body, united both to insist on the vindication of their 
rights, and, not less, to insist on the obedience of their own 
individual members to aU the rules and usages of the road. 



THE BATH RACE. 



Mr. Freeth has been most patriotic. He has taken the 
trouble to ride over the course for this contest by the new 
route, guiding him.self by Mr. Hutchings's map, for the pur- 
pose of ascertaining whether there would be any difficulty 
if that were trusted to for sole guide. 

In the case of a doubt, which we shall presently come to, 
he has given us a map drawn to correspond with his im- 
pressions, as contrasted with the plan issued in the 
Gazette. 

We may at once say that we see no material discrepancy,* 
and, in point of distance, Mr. Freeth agrees exactly with 
Mr. Hutchings. 

Mr. Freeth's letter is too voluminous for production 
entire, and we must .content ourselves with such extracts 
as may tend to elucidate the directions previously given. 

Between Bath and Box UiU, — " Never go under the 
railway, but at Box Station cross the railway, and then 
turn to left. There is no mistaking the way here. In 
Box village take the broad main road, and commence the 
ascent, crossing the railway between the two tunnels." 

" After the descent of Box Hill, you find yourself in the 
village of Pickwick, which is almost one with Corsham. 
Beware here of Uift road to Chippenham." 

At the four cross roads, marked on the map, beyond the 
triangle, there is a notice on the right saying, " To the 
station ; " but Mr. Freeth says the " ' park ' in the corner 
of the cross roads is not a prominent feature." 

Mr. Hutchings says, " Take this turning and bear left 
when at the station, as there js a turning there on the right 
which would lead S.W." 

This appears to be the one point requiring care, and Mr. 
Freeth informs us that this turn to the left is taken 
befire absolutely entering the station, and is much sharper 
than is represented in the Gazette map. 

From this point to Melksham is plain sailing, as far as 
directions go, Mr. Freeth saying, " Mr. Hutchings's direc- 
tions carried me admirably along, save at Corsham, and I 



thank him for my own part, and no doubt he will be 
thanked by others, for the care and trouble he has dis- 
played." 

SlTBFACE ON 25TH INSTANT. 

Mr. Freeth describes the different stretches of road as 
follows : — 

*'Bath to Corsham. — Imagine the Hammersmith to 
Houuslow road in its very worst state aft«r heavy rains and 
heavy traffic. Corsham to Melksham rough cross-country 
work, up and down hill, and over an atrocious surface. 
From Melksham to Devizes slightly improved, much more 
level, but with stiff hill into Devizes. The roads are rough 
macadam in the centre (not loose, of course), whilst the 
sides are a kind of macadam pudding. In very dry 
weather I expect the sides make good running, but after 
the late heavy rains I chose the rough but honest centres. 
I reached Devizes at 11.25 a.m. (rather poor work, 20f 
mile^ in 2 hours 38 minutes), but I certainly spent a good 
half hour at Corsham, consulting map and natives, and 
. taking refuge from a shower. Not having eaten nor drank 
since the previous night in London, I here ordered break- 
fast, and enjoyed it exceedingly. Owing to this and anotlier 
shower I did not leave till 12.30 p.m. (1 hour 5 min. halt). 
On the downs, ttesn the summit, I was overtaken by a 
terrific downpour, not a vestige of shelter being anywhere 
in sight, not even a tree or post, so I submitted to be 
drenched to* the music (?) of thunder. I kept up a fair 
pace, however, and after twenty or thirty minutes it ceased, 
and the sun coming out strongly by the time (1.60 p.m.) 
I reached Marlborough I was quite dry again. The road 
two miles out of Devizes to Marlborough is doubtless, in 
fine dry weather, capital running, but, as I saw it, it was 
bad, being a thick, wet, chalky paste, covered with water 
channels crossing the road, and making the hills (?) more 
especially heavy. Without dismounting, I pushed on to 
the ' stiff climb out of the town.' This is not difficult, I 
should say, in fine weather, although a somewhat long 
grind, but (the surface then being pudding), when half-way 
up, I, having assured myself no one was looking, ' did the 
easy.' Once at the top of this hill, the finest bit of the 
journey commences, and in fine weather I question if it 
ends before Maidenhead, perhaps even further. On the 
day I write of Hungerford, under 10 miles, was the end, 
and after that place I plunged several times, for distances 
of 100 or 200 yards, into veritable bogs or quagmires, at 
the risk of being thrown if I kept up the pace. The path 
looked tempting, but ' noblesse oblige,* and I did not wish 
to pocket my badge. I may mention, en passant, that if I 
ran through one splash I ran through two hundred, — ^the 
'all-bright' machine was rather a misnomer. Reaching 
Newbury at 3.35 p.m (1 hour 45 min. from Marlborough), 
I dismounted to refi:esh, and whildt so engaged there came 
down a fierce and heavy hailstorm, making the roads ten 
times worse than before. When the storm was over I was 



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LONDON BICYCLE CLUB GAZETTE, 



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told by a venerable and native Hodge that there would be 
no more rain for several hours, which prediction proved 
true, though I ventured to doubt it at the time, no more 
rain, I believe, failing that day« Thl^ kept me till 4.20 
p.m. I now pushed on to Beading by a road looking as 
if the floods had lately been over it — ^long streams of 
water, small but deep lakes, and soft quicksand islands. 
I was rather amused at the pretty (?) little fountains and 
waterspouts that my front wheel was forming as I careered 
gaily along. What was the hind wheel doing? Some 
distance before Newbury I had become aware of sundry 
peculiar exclamations from the lower kind of pedestrians 
and carters, but now these became unusually frequent, and 
the more decent class turned their heads and smiled. The 
cause was not difficult to discover. I had become a '' sight " 
behind. From top to toe, head and cap included, rider 
and steed were plastered in mud. The good people of 
Reading laughed, as well they might, at so strange i^ sight, 
but, however much it -amused them, there was not one 
word of coarse chaff or ridicule addressed to me. I mention 
it here to their credit, for both as I entered Reading, and 
inquired for the London Road, and, later on, rode in a 
hurry to the railway station to catch a train, through the 
middle of tlieir most crowded streets, one and all most 
obligingly made way and directed me most promptly and 
civilly to my destination. ' But how is this ? ' some one says. 
To be brief, I entered Reading at 5.50 p.m., and five 
minutes afterwards I felt my handle to be in two pieces — 
this was the finishing stroke. To Timberlake's, at Maiden- 
head, was the thought, and action followed thought, a train 
was just caught (fare 11^, bicycle 2s), and Maidenhead 
soon after reached. By a rare piece of luck I came across 
the manager, a very civil employee, who promised faitlifuUy 
to' let me have the machine by Tuesday evening, and 
shortly afterwards I took ticket to London and reached 
home at 10 p.m. Distance ridden in all 73^ miles ; wind 
very favourable. — ^Yours truly, H. C. Fkketh." 

RACE MEETING. 
Tickets. 
Members will shortly receive tickets as under : — 

Member's ticket 1 

Admission tickets 6 

Ladies' tickets (free) 2 

and if competitors : — 

Practice ticket 1 

Each Member is earnestly requested to do his best to 
dispose of the Admission tickets, for which he will have 
to account to the Hon. Sec. Additional issues of Ladies' 
tickets will be proportioned to the sale of Admission tickets 
in each case. 

Admission tickets at 2s. will be sold at Is. 6d. before the 
day of the races. 

C. R. HuTCHiNas, Hon. Sec. 



LONDON ATHLETIC CLUB. 

Favoured with fine weather, the above Club held their 
First Summer Meeting at Stamford Bridge. Tlie pro- 
gramme was of a somewhat miscellaneous character, 
including, as it did, running, jumping, bicycling, and 
boxing. The latter was conducted on a raised platform 
situated exactly facing the Grand Stand. In each round 
the competitors indulged in soine very hard hitting, and in 
more than one instance blood was drawn. We noticed 
several well-known pugilists, who attended on their prot^gis, 
sponging and fanning them when at their respective comers. 
Although the bouts were much appreciated by the majority 
of male spectators, we heard many ladies in the Grand 
Stand express opinions that the ring should luive been 
placed in some other quarter of the ground as it was 
impossible for them to look at the other sports without 
seeing what they termed '' the disgusting exhibition. " 
There is no doubt that this competition attracted to the 
enclosure a rough element which is not often to be seen at 
the L.A.C. meetings. 

The Bicycle Race, which doubtless interests our readers 
most, brought out a field of 27 out of an entry of 29, which 
speaks well for the handicapping. This, with one exception , 
was good. Cambridge, the winner, was thrown in with a 
start of 335 yards. In the 25 miles championship he rode 
very slowly, being lapped at four miles; he then rode a 
' roadster machine. Since then he has purclmsed a racer, 
and by constant practice made so much improvement that 
he was able to win the final with ease, notwithstanding a 
bad cropper he had immediately after winning his heat. 
Wyndham rode well, and showed something like his old 
form. Beck was tired after his exertions at Cambridge on 
the day previous, and did not ride in anything like the 
form he showed in the race for the-champion^p. Appended 
is a detailed return of the racing. 

1st Heat : E. W. P. Cambridge, I Zingari B.C., 335 yards, 
1st ; R A. Runtz, Pickwick B.C., 250, 2nd; W. Wyndham, 
L.B.C., scratch, 3rd ; F. T. East, S.B.C., 90, ; H. 
Tomkins, B.B.C., 130, ; H. H. Crawley, University Col 
A.C., 280, 0; W. Buist, L.B.C., 315, 0; C. 0. Potter, 
Homsey B.C., 300, 0. Cambridge was never approached^ 
and won by a long distance^ riding the last mile almost as 
fast as Wyndham. Wyndham and East, only seeing Runtz 
in front, imagined themselves second and thitd, and conse- 
quently thinking they had qualified for the final, did not 
persevere. This &lse impression did not, fortunately, affect 
the result of the race. Time 9 mins. 35 sees. 

2nd Heat: W. Quirk, Kingston B.C., 90 yards, 1st; 6. P. 
Coleman, L.B.C., 260, 2nd ; S. Kemp, Pickwick B.C., 300, 
3rd ; Cyril J. Turner, L.B.C., 315, ; A. D. Butler, L.B.C., 
350, ; C. W. Fagan, Druids' B.C., 380, ; A. P. C. 
Perceval, Wanderers' B.C., 150, ; E. C. Koch, L.B.C., 
285, ; A. James, 400, 0. This heat resulted in a grand 
race, the first six men being all close together. Kemp led 



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LONDON BICYCLE CLUB GAZETTE. 



after riding two miles, with Coleman, Turner, Butler, and 
Fagan in close attendance. Coleman then spurting shot to 
the front but came back again. Turner made his effort in 
the last lap but one, and took a clear lead, which, however, 
he was not allowed to hold for long, being repassed by 
Coleman and Kemp. While this struggle was going on 
between the leaders. Quirk, who rode in fine form, was 
gradually overhauling them, and, in the last lap, took the 
premier position and won, amidst great excitement, by two 
yards, one yard separating second and third, and the other 
three all together close up. Time 9 mins. 45f sees. 

3rd Heat : P. Vacani, S.B.C., 300 yards, 1st ; J. Williams, 
jun., L.B.C., 315, 2nd ; E. J. Hall, Surrey B.C., 50, 3rd ; 
J. Horn, Lombard B.C., 290, ; A. Herbert, L.B.C., 375, 
; A. J. Millington, Pickwick B.C., 380, ; E. T. York, 
I Zingari B.C., 240, ; T. Secretan, Druids B.C., 270, ; 
C. Docwra, L.B.C., 120, 0, Vacani, Williams, Horn, and 
Millington made a good race of it for half distance, after 
which the two latter dropped back. Horn upon being 
caught by Hall stuck gamely to his hind wheel for tw^ 
laps, but Millington resigned the contest immediately Hall 
caught him, half a mile from home. Docwra had not re- 
covered from the effects of his fall, and did not ride so well 
as usual E. T. York competed in the short distance cham- 
pionship, and received 240 yards start in this handicap^ 
notwithstanding which he was not in the hunt. Time 
9 mins. 55 sees. 

^ Final Heat : Cambridge, 1st ; Runtz, 2nd ; Wjmdham, 
3rd ; Quirk, ; Kemp, ; Vacani, ; Hall, ; Williams, 0. 
Wyndham starting at a great pace caught Hall, to whom 
he was conceding fifty yards, in the first lap. The following 
was the order at the end of the first mile : Cambridge, 
Coleman, Williams, Runtz, Eemp, Vacani, with Quirk, 
Wyndham, and Hall a long way in the rear. Coleman 
gave up in the second mile, when with the leading division. 
Wyndham caught Quirk when in the first lap of the third 
mile, and a grand race ensued for two laps, but in the last 
Wyndham, putting on one of his brilliant E^urts for which 
he is famous, shot right away and only lost second place by 
a few yards. Cambridge in the last lap overtook Hall, with 
whom he spurted down the back straight, and eventually 
landed an easy winner by 130 yards from Runtz, who was 
three yards in ftont of Wyndham. Time 9 min& 33^ sees. 



COMMITTEE, 
At the meeting of the Committee held at 44, Pall Mall, 
on Monday, the 27th inst., the following gentlemen were 
elected Members : — 



Name and Addxen. ProiiBHio&. 

Metcalfe,F. E., Highfield, 
Hendon, N.W. Nttne; E. Clark. A. V. Roae. 

McLean, R. D. D., St. 
Stephen's Club, West- 
minBter Gentleman. F. M. Williams. J.W.Potter 

Scott, B. J., The Cres- 
cent, Sidoup None. H.E. Millar. H. Sharpe. 



SATURDAY RUNS. 

N.E. District. 
Only four members turned out for the run to Chigwell 
Row, and enjoyed, for the most part, good roads (the road 
from Snaresbrook to Woodford Bridge was, as usual, bad), 
and an absence of the frequent heavy showers which oc- 
curred in other parts. At Chigwell Row, a member of the 
N.W. District, and his brother, were found, and the party 
was further increased by the arrival of a party of seven 
North-West members. These all had tea at the '* Maypole," 
and rode back as far as Walthamstow in company. Present : 
Devitt, Pelly, Gerard Smith, and Francis Godlee (District 
Captain). 

N.W. District. 

Hay 25tk — The precarious weather of last week, and 
the L. A.C. meeting, naturally minimised most of the Meets, 
but the north-eastern suburbs seem to have enjoyed a 
singular immunity from the heavy showers which harassed 
other districts ; and nine N.W. members participated in 
the run to Chigwell Row. The road to Tottenham presents 
but few attractions at its best, and one would hardly select 
it, from choice, for a run in wet weather ; however, having 
got over the macadam and sticky slush, the roads east of 
the Lea were found very good. Walthamstow and Wood- 
ford were soon passed, and the series of somewhat stiff hills 
from Woodford Bridge successively surmounted. The 
" Maypole " was reached at 5.35, the N.E. representatives 
awaiting our arrival, and after tea together we left about 
seven, riding in company to Walthamstow, where Mr. 
Godlee took us round by Higham Hill, over some good 
lanes. Continuing via Homsey and Muswell Hill, the run 
was concluded by 9 o'clock. Distance, 33 miles. Present : 
Alison, Bacon, Clark, Freeman, R. V. Jennings, N. ^. 
Morris, Powell, Tegetmeier, Woodhall, and a visitor. 

N.B.— The run next Saturday will be via Fortis Green, 
Colney Hatch, Southgate, and Potter's Bar, to Northaw, 
returning by the main road. We should be glad to see a 
little more of our Maida Hill and St. John's Wood neigh- 
bours. Should the weather be only moderately fine, the 
ensuing run cannot fail to be much enjoyed, and it will 
certainly be over before dark. 

J. W. Alison, District Captain. 



West Division. 
Only four men showed up at Eew Bridge on Saturday, 
and one of them beat a retreat at once, on account of the 
weather. The other three rode to Kingston Bridge, and 
got well soaked for their pains. After waiting three-quarters 
of an hour in a stable yard, they saw the Hon. See's back 
disappearing over the bridge, and, following him, found 
that he and Jennings had been waiting at the other inn. 
The rain precluding all farther riding, we all turned home. 
Present : W. A. Smith, J. W. Langmore, W. F. J. Potts. 



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The Trial Ilace for the West District will be held one 
evening next week. Competitors will receive notice of date 
by letter from me. 

W. A. Smith, District Captain. 

N.B. — On and after the first Wednesday in June, there 
will be ashort Club run, starting from the Dep6t at 7 p.m. 



Notwithstanding the rain and mud, four members left 
Central Croydon shortly after the appointed time and 
proceeded along the Brighton Road until Smitham Bottom 
was reached, when, a sharp shower coming on, it was decided 
to turn to the left and seek shelter under a railway arch. 
After waiting about twenty minutes, a start was again 
made in the direction of Crawley, but on nearing Red Hill, 
the rain again threatening, the run was altered to Reigate, 
where we were very glad to get both tea and shelter. T. 
Johns arrived after we had finished tea, having ridden after 
us. The return journey was commenced at eight o'clock, 
and Croydon reached shortly after nine. Present : A. 
Bishop, E. H. Carr, T. Johns, C. E. Parker, A, 0. Tyler. 



BATH ROAD TRIAL. 



The following gentlemen 

P. M. Williams 
W. J. Williams 
G. G. Walker 
Forbes Byers 
A. E. Buckler 
R. Walmesley 
W. J. MuUer 
W. J. P. Potts 
H. W. Bridges 
F. E. Appleyard 
M. B. O'ReiUy 
A. H. Garvey 
A. Herbert 
J. Wilks Wilks 
J. Powell 
A. Wilkinson 
F. Godlee 
T. G. NeviU 
P. Dalton 
H. C. Freeth 
S. B. Smith 
W. T. Thorn 



have entered for the above : — 

C. Taylor 
H. V. Cleaver 
R. H. Curtis 
A. D. Butler 
H. Wilson 
J. H. Wilson 
A. H. Koch 
C. E. Parker 
C. R. Freeman 
A. H. Cook 
R. Newman 
Theo. Godlee 
6. A. Shoppee 
G. P. Coleman 
J. W. Potter 
W. B. Parker 
P. E. Langdale 
J. Kinder 
W. S. Buist 
A. P. Stokes 
J. F. Marchant. 



UNIFORM. 



Members are informed that Mr. Goy has now in stock a 
complete outfit for hot weather. Alpaca cap-covers at 2/9, 
thin grey flannel at the same price as the ordinary cloth, 
and thin woollen uniform stockings at 4s. the pair. 

C. R. HuTOHiNas. 



EXCHANGE LIST. 
(Two Insertions, not exceeding three lines, for Is,) 

For Sale. My 56-inch Stassen, j-inch bright ; in daily 
use at present time ; in perfect order ; very comfortable, 
especially down hiU ; weight 56lbs. complete. Price iBlO. 
—A. 0. Ward. 

58-in. Stassen, front-wheel brake, net\r last season, price 
£12. — J. F. Marchant, 59, Bemers-street, W. 

All-bright 54-in. London, in daily use ; handsome 
machine, cost j^l 8 10s. last November. Wanted, agood strong 
52-in. roadster. — C. W. Dicker, 2, Belgrave Terrace, Lee. 

Fifty-four inch Keen Eclipse racing machine, new last 
year, warranted sound and perfect. Price j^IO 10s. — T. 
Heath, Thombank, The Common, Sutton. 



RACING FIXTURES. 



June 1st. — Moseley Harriers, Birmingham, 1 mile Bicycle 
Handicap. Entries C2s. 6d.) close May 21st, 
to H. M. Oliver, Hon. Sec, The Laurels, 
Ward End, near Birmingham. 

June 15th. — L. B. C. Annual Meeting. 4 miles Handicap, 
open to Amateurs as defined by Bicycle Union 
Council. 1 mile Members' Handicap. lOmiles 
District Race. Entries (2s. 6d. each event) 
close 10th June, to C. R Hutchings, Esq., 
Hon. Sec. 

June 22nd.— West Kent B.C. at Crystal Palace. 3 Miles 
Amateur Handicap. Entries (2s 6d) close 
15th June. Forms of Entry, etc., of W. B. 
Tanner, Hon. Sec, 11, Abchurch Lane, E.C. 

June 22nd. — Private Banks C.C. at Catford Bridge. 2 
miles Handicap. Handicapper, M. D. 
Riicker, Jun. Entries (2s 6d) close June 
12th, to C. H. Raffles, Hon. Sec, Laburnum 
Villa, Catford, S.E. 

June 29th. — ^London Athletic Club at Stamford Bridge. 
2 miles Handicap. Handicapper, M. D. 
Riicker, Jun. Entries (5s non-Members, 
2s 6d Members) close June 15th, to Wm. 
Waddell, Hon. Sec, Mansion House 
Chambers, Queen Victoria Street. 

June 29th. — Beckenham C.C, on Cricket Club Ground 
(splendid grass course). 2 Miles Handicap. 
Handicapper, M. D. Riicker, Jun. Entrid^s 
(2s 6d) close June 17th, to Allen H. Stone- 
ham, Hon. Sec, The Avenue, Beckenham. 
Practice allowed on the Ground two days 
before the race. 

-Pickwick Bicycle Club, Alexandra Palace, 
2 miles Handicap. 

-Temple Bicycle Club Race Meeting, at Stam- 
ford Bridge. 



July 13th.- 
July 20th.- 



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LONDON BICYCLE CLUB GAZETTE, 



LONDON BICYCLE CLUB MEETS. 
June 1. 
N,E, District.— he^ Bridge Road, 3.30 p.m., for Harlow. 

N.W. District— '' Jsick Straw's Castle,'' 4 p.m., for 
Northaw. 

TT. District. — Kew Bridge, 4 p.m., for Chertsey. Meet 

S.W. at Spelthorn. 
S.W. District — Surbiton Station, 4 p.m., for Chertsey. 

Meet W. at. Spelthorn. 
S,E, District (Croydon Division). — Central Croydon Station, 

3.45 p.m., for Wrotham via Birchwood Corner. 

Meet B. Division at "Bell," Bromley. 
S.E\ District (Blackheath Division).—" Hare and Billet," 

3.30 p.m., for Wrotham. Meet C Division at 

"Bell," Bromley. 

June 8. 
N.E. District.— l!fo Run. 
N. W. District.— mo Run. 
W. District— JHo Run. 
S.W. District— No Run. 
8.L\ District {GroydonDiwisiou). — No Run. 
8.E. District (Blackheath Division).— No Run. 

Whit Monday. 

Trial from Bath to London (100 Miles) for "L.B.C. Road 
Medals." 

We hear that Mr. Newman has been distinguishing him- 
self on the racing path in the West of England, but we 
have no particulars before us. We take this opportunity 
of reminding members that accounts of these distant meet- 
ings are far more valuable and interesting to London men 
than accounts of races at Stamford Bridge or Lillie Bridge, 
where many members attend personally, and the descriptions 
of which are often read in other papers. While thus in- 
viting accounts of race meetings, we will avail ourselves of 
the chance to call members' attention to another matter. 
Some time back we pointed out that unless members 
assisted in the supply of MSS., it was most difficult to keep 
the Gazette going. The delays in issue, which have too 
frequently occurred, have been almost in each case due to 
the want of a choice in material. Members should bear in 
mind that they get their paper gratis, and that if they sit 
in judgment upon it, without stirring hand or foot to help, 
the style of the Gazette must deteriorate, from the sheer 
necessity of inserting every scrap of MS. which comes to 
hand, without regard to quality. 

Will some member be kind enough to send me, by post, 
an account of the best and shortest route from Portsmouth 
to Reading, stating the distance, metal, and hills ? — ^A. J, 
Bacon, 12, Belsize Road, N.W. 



To tlie Editor of the London Bicycle Club Gazette. 

Deab Sib, — ^There have been several letters in your 
paper on the subject of the Club Uniform, so I trust I am not 
"out of order" in venturing these few remarks on the 
racing costume. 

It certainly is a great advantage to have a distinguishing 
mark for members of our Club on the racing path, but this 
could surely be effected without their being disfigured in 
the present sombre funereal attire. 

There is difficulty enough to induce members to begin a 
career on the " path " whicli may prove equally glorious to 
themselves and to the Club they represent, without this 
additional obstacle of their having to begin by making 
themselves so fearfully conspicuous in black. 

In the uniform grey has been adopted because it is more 
serviceable and cooler than a darker colour, and now, for 
what manner of reason do we, in our racing costume, com- 
bine hideousness and discomfort? for, in a long-distance 
race, under a broiling sun, our "gentlemen in black" 
labour under a serious disadvantage when contending 
against their whiter brethren. 

Apologising for trespassing thus far on your valuable 
space, I am, yours, &c., 

Blackamoor. 

CLUB RUNS. 

- To the Editor of the London Bicycle Club Gazette. 

Sir, — I noticed in your last issue an unsigned notice to 
the W. Division, describing the route to be taken to Ripley 
on Saturday, '* unless the men present would prefer to carry 
out the run to Bumham Beeches, which was unfortunately 
fia;ed for the day of the Champions/up Uaces.^* I also 
noticed that the meet of the S.W. Division is "Kingston 
Bridge, 5.0 p.m., for Ripley." 

Now, Sir, it would appear that the run to Ripley .was 
intended to be made by these two Divisions in company. 
Is the S.W. to shiver in this wintry weather until some 
passing rider reports to them that the Western men present 
have preferred to go to Bumham Beeches ? 

I had intended riding down circuitously, and meeting 
the West somewhere en route; but I must abandon. this, 
because, although I know the route they will take if they 
go to Ripley, they may, unfortunately for me, " prefer to 
carry out the run to Bumham Beeches." I am personally 
strongly of opinion that, except in the case of general 
Meets, the destination and extent of all Club runs should 
be decided on the spot, according to wind and weather, but 
I earnestly raise my protest against fixing and publishing a 
run to one place, and then changing it to another place, at 
the caprice of the men who are at the starting-point, and 
to the detriment of those who may wish to join in on the 
way. — ^Yours, &c., 

COHSISrENOT. 



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LONDON BICYCLE CLUB GAZETTE. 



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To the Editor of the London Bicycle Club Gazette, 

Sir, — I have thought for some time that it would be a 
good thing for a large Club like ours to possess several 
Club machines. Members' own machines are, at least/once 
iu the season sent to the makers to be overhauled. This 
takes sometimes a week or two, and during that time one 
has to give up riding, or hire a machine. Now, it is no 
easy thing, as I can tell &om experience, to procure a de- 
cent one. I spent the evenings of a whole week some time 
ago in hunting for one, and at last a bicycle maker, as a 
great favour, let me have one on depositing £b. 

The Club bicycles, I propose, should be kept at the head- 
quarters of each District. The names of members who 
liire the machines should be entered in a book for that 
purpose, and a fee of 10s. a week charged. Each bicycle, 
before being let out, should be inspected by some appointed 
member to ascertain if the last person who rode it did it 
any damage. This inspection could take place at Saturday 
Meets. Breakages would, of course, have to be made good. 

There is little doubt, I think, that this would be a finan- 
cial success. We could start at first with one macliine in 
each District, and the District Captain would soon see if 
the demand for it was sufficient to keep another machine 
going. 

Trusting that other members of the Club will express 
their opinion on this subject, 

I remain, yours faithfully, 
V. 



THE HAMPTON COURT MEET. 
To the Editor of the London Bicycle Club Gazette. 

Sib, — ^Your account of the Meet, from the spectator's 
pomt of view, is excellent, and gives to my mind the 
clearest idea of the effect at the Lion Gates that I have yet 
seen* I think, however, that, for the benefit of those who 
did not ride, some remarks on the procession, as it appeared . 
to its component parts, may not be amiss. 

In the first place, you are perfectly right about the cause 
of the gap. Some one fell, in mounting, just in front of 
me, and, of course, kept all the rest back ; the consequence 
was, that fiill steam had to be put on to get up to the 
leaders, who were not caught till the further side of 
Hampton Green. No wonder we presented a ragged ap- 
pearance ! After this the riding was very good, and if 
there had only been anyone to see it, the sight in some of 
the lanes, particularly at the Hanworth turning, must have 
been really fine, at least to a rider's eye. As we turned, 
nothing could be more regular than our half-mile column 
of greys firom front to rear. I saw no falls, and all seemed 
to go well up to the Diana Fountain. This we began to 
circle at 10 miles an hour, and then, as has been stated, 
had to puU up and dismount about twenty yards from the 
Hampton Court side. 



If ever another great Meet is held, some of the following 
suggestions may be useful :— 

(1) That the start should be somewhere in the country, 
at a distance from railway stations, and consequent crowds, 
so that the Clubs should have time to get into good order 
before presenting themselves to the general body of specta- 
tors, which would, at least, throw the entire onus of failure 
on the latter. 

(2) That the leaders should fitart more slowly, to allow 
for possible falls and breaks in the column behind them, 
and should maintain, if possible, a more even pace, the 
starts and stops on this occasion being sometimes very 
sudden. 

(3) That the high road past the Lion Gates be avoided 
altogether, the Clubs riding from the country into the park 
from the Teddington end, and there dismounting in succes- 
sion of pairs on reaching the Lion Gates, as proposed in a 
contemporary. Thus the attention of the police could be 
concentrated on the park, and the inconvenience to the 
travelling public be lessened. 

(4) That (if they have power to do so) the police should 
stop all carriage traffic through the park at least half an 
hour before the procession is expected to enter, and make 
all carriages within the park go on the grass (which, strange 
to say, they were forbidden to do on this occasion, — ^a 
carriage-party of my acquaintance being repeatedly told to 
" keep moving, but not leave the road "). 

Thus the road might, at least, be free, and if the inner 
side of the Diana circle could be cleared, and the outside 
roped, so much the better. Whether these, or other im- 
provements, are feasible, must, however, be left to the 
Committee to decide, for whose past exertions I beg to offer 
the best thanks of 

One who Rode.- 



NOTICE TO CORRESPONDENTS. 

All contributions must be addressed to "The Editor, 
L.B.C. Gazette, 3$, Eastdieap, E.C," and must bear the 
name of the author, though not necessarily for insertion. 

They must be written on one side of the paper only, 
and, if immediate insertion is desired, must be received not 
later than Monday morning. 

No communication of a personal character will be pub- 
lished without the writer's name being appended. 

Copies can be obtained at Goy's, Leadenhall Street, E.C., 
price 4d., or post free at 4^d., on application to the Editor. 

Non-Members may, upo» approval by the Committee, 
subscribe for the whole year at 10s. 6d., post free, the right 
being reserved of cancelling the subscription, upon return- 
ing the balance less the value of copies already supplied at 
4id. per copy. 

ANSWER TO CORRESPONDENT. 
0*N. Nealb.— Thanks. Will keep them till we get a few 
more. 



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GK O 

BICYCLE OUTFIHER, CLUB UNIFORMS, 

AND SUNDRIES. 

PURCHASE 

YOUB 

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GOV'S NEW PLAN. 

All the Best Makes at Manufacturer's Prices. 
By arrangement with the Manufacturers orders have the same 
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a deal of trouble. 

IMMEDIATE DELIVERY. 
Write for Particulars and Price Lists, 



TRICYCLES for Ladies or Gentlemen. 
Y OUTHS' BICYCLE S. 

GOV'S CLUB ROOM, 



OfiFered FREE 



MOST CENTRALLY SITUATED. 

to Officers of all Clubs to 
Committee Meetings, &c. 



arrange Matches, 



THIEI BTJGhXiEIT. 

THE BTT6LET being but 6 inches by 4 by S (o%'al;, 4 turns in B flat, Military, 
Braas, O. S. MounU, Solid Guards, &e., IGs. 6d.; oval, 17s. 6d. Copper, 17s. 6d. ; 
oval, 18s. 6d. Extra mounts. Fittings, &c. to order. Engravings, Strings, Plating. 
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Soldered Chain, 3«. Keat'§ Celebrattd Limdon-made ComeU, S, S|, and 3 to 80 Gs. 
Amateur's Complete Superior* 5 Gs. 

H. KEAT it SONS, Sole Xaken, Katthias Bd., London. K. 

The longest and Largest Bore Instrument in the Smallest Compass ever 

made. Used by the Principal Clubs and Bicyclists of the day, 

A BOON TO BICYCLISTS. 

BICYCLE RIDING TAUCHT PERFECTLY 

AT THE 

Gxnrsr bio"s-ole souooij. 

The largest in London. 

Single Lesson, Is. 6d. Perfect Biding guaranteed, 10s 

Address-CHBQUBR YARD, 
OPPOSITE ALDGATE METROPOLITAN STATION, 

ALDGATE HIGH STREET. 
Teacher— Professor T. QUINTON. 

CHAMPION ORNAMENTAL RIDER. 

THE EMPRESS 

Is acknowledged as the best Boadster. Strong, durable, and easy run- 
ning. Always gives satisfaction. Strongly recommended by members 
of London Bicycle and other Clubs. 

Sole Agent: T. A. SM ILY, D ALSTOH JinfCTIOK, E. 

THE NORWOOD. 

A newly-designed light Roadster. A very elegant machine. Will 
stand plenty of work. Weight of 52-inch, 40 lb. City Agent : — 



O 



f 21, LEADENHALL STREET, ) x^vnov V C 
\ 54, LIME STREET , } ^™^^' ^•^• 

W. KEEN, Empress Bicycle Works, Norwood Junction, S.E. 
Price Lists, One Stamp, 



THE BICYCLE OF THE DAY FOR 1878 IS J. STASSEN'S " NONPAREIL" 

The only machine fitted with Screwless Spokes, warranted not to break 
or loosen ; patent eccentric brake easily applied and wonderfully effective ; 
new patent double-coned adjustable steering gear ; best red rubber tyres, 
frictionless bearings, and all latest improvements. Every bicyclist ought 
to possess our Patent Circular-wheel Valise. These machines are made 
for work, and are the best and cheapest machines, as they require no 
repairs and never get out of order, and are strongly recommended by 
Members of the London Bicycle Club, and by all who have used them. 
Weight of machine, from 40 lb, or from 1 lb. per inch. 

City Agent: GOT, 21^ Leadenhall Street 
PEASES, Princes Street, Leicester Sqnare, London, W. 

J. STASSEN & SON, 251, EUSTON ROAD, N.W. 

Factory Entrance : BEAUMONT PLACE. 
Prospectus Id., with Photo. 3d. All sizes kept in stock ready for delivery. 

T. A SMILY, Bioyole Agent. 

Agent for best Bicycles. Any Bicycle supplied to order if not in Stock 
A First-class Bicycle Support (or Map) supplied free with each new 
Machine. All price lists post free. Second-hand Machines sold at a 
Commission of £1. Is ; if not sold no charge. A Photograph of J. Keen 
(Champion) free on personal application. Repairs well executed. 
NEARLY OPPOSITE DALSTON JUNCTION. 



A FIRST-CLASS ROADSTER, 

Manufactured by HOWARD & CO., 

CHARLES STREET, HATrOSJ GARDEl^, LONDON, E.G. 

Riders should see this Machine before purchasing elsewhere. 

Price Lists and full particulars free on application. 

JOHNSON'S 

PATENT ROAD MEASURER. 

I A NOVEL AND USEPUL INVENTION. 




Advantages of this invention are as follows : 
Ist. It shows at a glance the distance travelled. 
2nd. The nimiber of evolutions performed by any kind of machinery. 
3rd. It is adaptable to Bicycles, Drags, Caniages, Cabs, Omnibuses, 

or vehicles of any kind. 
4th. It is simple in construction, and easily attached. 
5th. Impervious to weather, and not liable to get out of order. 
6th. It can be supplied for wheels of any size. 
May be obtained through all the principal Carriage Builders, Opticians 
and Ironmongers. 

S. JOHNSON'S PATENT SURVEYING AND MEASURING INSTRUMENT. 

Tested by the Standard Measure of the Kingdom. 



PRICE lists on application TO THE PATENTEE. AGENTS WANTED. 



JOHNSON, 93, HATTON GARDEN, LONDON. 



Printed for the Proprietors by Darling & Son, at the Minerva Steam 
Printing Office, 35, Eastcheap, London, E.C.— April 18, 1878. 



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9 

' J' engage done tons d, 4mter dans leura eoriia toute personnalM, toute allusion d^passant les Umites de la discussion la 

plus sincere et la plus courtoise.*' — ^Laboulbbnb. 



Vol. I No. 5.] 



Edited by A. OGIER WARD. [Thubsdat, April 25, 1878. 



CONTENTS. 



PAOB 

Easter '29 

The BathRun 29 

Blackheatli to Hayward's Heath, Brighton, HorBham, and Ockham 82 

A Solitazy Voyage of DiBoovery 82 

Exchange Lut 88 

A Solitary Ride 88 



PAOS 

London Bicycle Clab Meets 84 

Racing Fixtures 84 

The Hampton Court Meet 84 

Conespondenoe 84 

Notices to Correepondents « 85 



EASTER. 

If evidence were wanting of the extension of Bicycling as 
a national exercise and means of locomotion, it would be 
amply forthcoming after the recent holiday. 

We took onr spin, with many others, and were perfectly 

astounded at the number of bicycles to be seen on all 

oads. The style of riding has decidedly improved since 

riast year, and, by comparison with the same period, the 

numbers seemed doubled. 

Horses also appear to be rapidly reconciling themselves 
to the appearance of bicycles — ^though, as might be 
expected in the more remote districts of Wilts and 
Somerset, to which many of us penetrated, there were 
signs of skittishness among the local " dobbins." 

The manners of the numerous specimens of the species 
" cad " have not improved much ; and one at least of our 
Members is suffering from a ruffianly assault. A letter in 
another column is the outpouring of a spirit sorely tried 
during the last few days in this manner. 

We would call the earnest attention of the Bicycle 
Union to this matter. It is high time something was done, 
and we would almost prefer to put ourselves under the 
protection of the police, at the cost of possibly restrictive 
though salutary regulations, than to be much longer sub- 
jected to the ribald jests and cowardly assaults of holiday 
cads. In several provincial towns there is evidence of 
judicious recognition of our exercise. Rochester and 
Leicester have for a long time regulated the passage of 
bicycles by insisting on bells, lamps, and a moderate pace ; 



and those of us who visited Winchester were surprised by 
a vigilant system of octroi. At each entrance to the city 
was stationed a policeman, armed with instructions to 
insist on the production of bells or a dismount. 

We think our readers would do well for the future 
always to go provided with bells, and so save themselves 
a tedious walk, as these regulations are sure to be adopted 
in all our large provincial towns. 



THE BATH RUN. 



It is impossible to give a full account of the various 
routes taken by our Members on the road down. A 
number left the Western Depdt on Friday morning, and 
arrived at Winchester the same evening, putting up at the 
*' George," which is confidently recommended for comfort 
and moderation. The road so far is too well known to 
need much description. It may be well to mention the 
long drag of over two miles out of Alton, and the danger- 
ously steep hill down into Winchester. 

The rain on Saturday morning prevented riding, but at 
one p.m. a start was made by train for Salisbury, and the 
last shower of rain fell at the moment of their arrival. 
The party consisted of Messrs. Alison, Buist, Cleaver, 
Dalton, Marchant, Ward, and some Belsize men. Mr. 
Wyndham's machine had been found to be cracked at the 
head only a minute before starting, and he was therefore 
compelled to take train home. While lunching at the 
" WTiite Hart," Salisbury, Mr. Hutchings turned up and 



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LONDON BICYCLE CLUB GAZETTE. 



Bacon, Baroett, Butler, Dalton, Freeth, Hindley, R E. 
Jessel, N. B. Morris, Pollock, Radford, Rogers, Sewell, 
Tegetmeir, W. J. Williams, and a visitor. 

J. W. Alison, District Captain. 

West Distbict. 

Only four men faced the almost tropical heat of Saturday 
last, viz., the Captain, J. P. Marchant, P. des Voeux, and 
J. W. P. Potts. Leaving Kew at 4.15 p.m., a halt was 
made at the corner of Gunnersbury Lane, and at 4.35 we 
left for Chenies, and rode by the lanes and Cuckoo to 
Greenford, West End, and Ruislip ; here, for two or three ' 
miles, the road was very rough and bad. The Captain 
almost succeeded in riding up the south side of Duck's Hill, 
getting within about 40 yards of tlie top before coming to a 
standstill. A halt was made at the top to enjoy the lovely 
view. The " Colossus of Roads " was the only one who 
ventured down the north side of Duck's Hill (the steepest 
in Middlesex) ; riders going that way should not follow his 
example. A request to ride through Moor Park was cor- 
dially acceded to, and the fine runs down to the mansion 
and gate were much appreciated. A halt was made at 
" The Swan," at Rickmansworth, where the Zingari Club 
was met, and after a consultation it was decided to stay to 
tea, and go for a swim in the Colne, at the Wooden Turn, 
a noted batliing place. This was accordingly carried out, 
and the bathe much enjoyed, and we then adjourned to 
the hotel for tea, where we found Dr. Langmore, who had 
been awaiting us at Chenies. After tea Langmore rode on 
to Watford to train up, as he was tired. We, in company 
with the I Zingari, took the road via Harefield. Only 
Smith and Cambridge succeeded in riding up Woodcock 
Hill. After the top was gained the roads were found 
splendid to Harefield. The long and steep run down by 
Breakspear Park took some of the men and machines in 
charge, and fairly ran away with them; however, all got 
down safely, the surface being so good. A wrong turn was 
taken before reaching Druhan, which took us to the foot of 
Red Hill ; we then came back straight down the UxWdge 
road to Hanwell, and then half the party kept the main 
road (bumpy macadam), while Cambridge, Smith, and the 
I Zingari Captain took the way via Little Ealing and Polly 
Lane, and arrived at Acton as the rear guard of the other 
division ran through. This run will shortly be repeated, 
when, if possible, a short swimming handicap will be 
arranged. Distance about 37 miles. 

W. A. Smith, District Captain. 

P.S. Members are requested to make every eiFort to be 
present at the joint meet with the South East District, at 
Caterham, next Saturday. 

S. W. District. 
S^nd Juns.^^Thxe^ members only were at Surbiton 
Station at 4.45 p.m., and nobody knowing much about 
Woking it was decided to go to Ripley. Route taken 



through Leatherhead and Cobham. Whilst at tea at 
Ripley three members dropped in who were staying in the 
neighbourhood, and had come into Ripley to forage. A 
very pleasant run home was enjoyed in the cool (?) of the 
evening. Present : St. J. A. Ryan, E. Meyer, A. H. Rolls. 

S.E. District. 
Owing to the counter-attractions at Catford Bridge, as 
well as the bad example of certain influential members, 
the run to Otford was somewhat thinly attended last 
Saturday. Six men started from the " Hare and Billet," 
Blackheath, but, after going a short distance, the allure- 
ments of Catford proved irresistible to the Division Captain, 
who left us, attended by another much-respected member. 
At Parnborough Prancis was found, and, after waiting a 
short time, the Croydon Division (consisting of Mr. Young) 
rode up in good triuL We were also joined by one clad 
in a brown uniform, whose goings on (and tumblings off) 
subsequently amused us a little. The roads were through- 
out the run in beautiful order, and a fair pace was kept up 
the long grind to the " Polbill Arms," which we reached in 
loose order and rather moist condition. The pleasant run 
down firom this point. was duly appreciated, and, after 
taking the sharp turn to the left near the bottom, we rode 
with caution down the steep descent under the railway. 
Here a diversion was created by a precipitous rush, on the 
part of the irrepressible stranger, through our midst with 
much shouting. On reaching Otford tea was ordered, and 
an instructive (though scarcely interesting) visit was paid to 
the remains of the Episcopal Palace and the parish church 
— two and a half Roman bricks in the wall of the latter 
being apparently the chief archaeological feature of the 
place. Tea at the " Bull" was well served and duly done 
justice to, and the party got underway in broad daylight. 
The charming piece of road along the Darent valley to 
Pamingham was much enjoyed, and, after a rest on the top 
of Pamingham Hill, home was reache<f without a dismount 
— Prancis leaving us at Poots Cray, and Toung at Sidcup. 
Law, who was out for the first time since his severe acci- 
dent, and used a machine resembling a 48-inch shunting 
locomotive, returned home early in the run. Present : 
Croydon Division, Young ; Blackheath Dyrision> C. W. H. 
Dicker (Captain for the day) ; R. 6. Prancb, C. R Law, 
and two visitors. ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ 
DOUBLE ACROSTIC. 
My first all Romish Drifts wear. 
My second is a kingdom. 
My third is preserved only to be slain. 
My fourth wounds to heal. 
My fifth is a reward of political merit. 
My sixth is a badge of servitude. 
My seventh is very dry. 
My eighth belonm solely to royalty. 
My ninth all soldfiers undergo. 
Tlie initials ^ve the name of one famous in our sport ; 
the terminals his reward. A. S. Ister. 



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LONDON BICYCLE CLUB GAZETTE. 



94 



LONDON BICYCLE CLUB MEETS. 

July 6. 

N.E, 2>i>^m/.—Lf a Bridge Road, 8.30 p.m., for Navestock. 

N.W, District^-'' Jack Straw's Castle," 4.0 p.m., for 

Little Berkhampstead. 
W, Disiriet — ^Kew Qreen, 4.0 p.m., for Windsor via Great 

Park, returning by Bells of Ouseley. 
S,W. District — Surbiton Station, 4.0 p.m., for Cliobham 

md Moulsey and Walton. 
S.E. District (Croydon Division). — Central Croydon Station, 

at 4.0 p.m. for East Grinstead. . 
S.E. District (Blackheath Division).— Foot of College Park 
Hill, Lewisham, at 3.30 p.m., for Greeuhitlie. 

July 13.— General Meet. 
N.E, District. — Top of Lea Bridge Road (near Dalstou 

and Hackney Downs Stations), at 4.30 p.m., for 

Chigwell, by Epping Forest 
KW. District.— '' J^k Straw's Castle," at 3.30 p.m. 

Meet other District at Sybom's Corner. 
W. District,— ToT^ of Lea Bridge Road, 4.30 p.m., for 

Chigwell (by train). 
S.W. District— Top of Lea Bridge Road, 4.30 p.m., for 

Chigwell (by train). 
8,E. District (Croydon Division). — Top of Lea Bridge 

Road. 4.30 p.m., for Chigwell (by train). 
S.E. District (Blackheath Division). — Top of Lea Bridge 

Road, 4.30 p.m., for Chigwell (by train). 

July 20. 
N. E. District — ^Lea Bridge Road, 3. 30 p.m. for Upminster. 
N.W. District,— " JsLck Straw's Castle," at 4.0 p.m., for 

Rickmansworth. 
W, District — Kew Green, at 4.0 p.m., for Bumham 

Beeches. Meet S.W. District at Harlington Comer 

at 4.45. 
S.W. District.— ''The Clarence," Teddington, at 4.0 p.m., 

for Bumham Beeches. Meet W. District at Har- 
lington Corner, at 4.45. 
S.E. District (Croydon Division).— Central Croydon Station, 

at 4.0. p.m., for Westerham via Sandersted. 
S.E. District (Blackheath Division).— Foot of College Park 

Hill, Lewisham, for Westerham via Bromley. 

July 27. 

N.JE. District— Lesk Bridge Road, at 3.30 p.m., for Ongar. 

N.W. District.— " Jaxk Straw's Castle," at 4.0 p.m., for 

Hatfield via Mims. 
W. District — ^Kew Green, at 4.0 p.m., for Horseley Towers 

vid Leatherhead, retum by Ockham. 
S. W. District — Surbiton Station, at 4.0 p.m., for Dorking. 

Meet S.£. District. 
S.E. District (Croydon Division).— Central Croydon Station, 

at 3.45 p.m., for Dorking. Meet S.W. District. 
S.E. District (Blackheath Division).— Foot of College Park 

Hill, Lewisham, for Sevenoaks. 



PRIVATE BANKS CRICKET CLUB SPORTS. 

This meeting has always been a favourite one amongst . 
athletes, by reason of the splendid grounds upon which 
they are held and the large and fashionable company that 
attend the sports. We this year noticed that the ladies 
were in even stronger force than usual, and it has rarely 
been our luck to see so many pretty &ces at an athletic 
gathering. The events were very numerous, and, only 
commencing operations at four o'clock, we should scarcely 
have thought it possible to get through the voluminous 
programme in time ; but three or four of the committee 
worked really well, and, notwithstanding an unavoidable 
delay at the commencement, the competitors were got out 
for their heats so quickly that a good deal of the time lost 
was made up in the first event. 

The programme included two Bicycle Races, a Two Miles 
Open Handicap, and a One Mile, for members only. The 
latter was mu off in one heat, and resulted in the victory 
of T. W. Young, 75 yards, John Horn, scratch, being 2nd, 
J. J. Turner 3rd. Appended is a retum of the Two Miles 
Open Handicap. 

First Heat : A. Herbert, L.B.C., 275 yards, Ist ; W 
Wyndham, scratch, 2nd ; C. R. Ham, 120, 3rd ; G. Bales, 
Pickwick B.C., 165, ; H. H. Plummer, Lombard B.C., 
220, 0. Herbert, who appeared to like the gra&s course, 
ran right away from all his followers with the exception of 
Wyndham. The latter appeared to be out of all fomi, and 
gained but little upon Herbert, who won by over 100 yards. 
Ham finished 10 yards behind Wyndham, and 5 ahead of 
Plummer. 

Second Heat :— J. Griffits, Uni. Coll. A.C., 210 yards, 
1st; E. H. Carr, L.B.C., 240, 2nd; H. Tomkins, Black- 
heath B.C., 120, 3rd; J. Horn, P.B.C & A.C., 150, 0; 
P. Thres, T.B.C., 220, ; A. Lindley, K.B.C., 280, 0. Tke 
limit man, notwithstanding his long start, was not in it, 
and had to retire after going three laps. The rest of the 
competitors made a splendid race of it until the last lap, 
all being well together, when Griffits put on an extra- 
ordinary spurt, and from last sailed away into first place, 
with Carr 5 yards behind, and Tomkins 4 yards behind him. 
Third Heat.— W. Quirk, K.B.C., 50 yards, 1st; J. 
Williams, Junr., L.B.C., 2nd ; W. P. English, Canonbury 
B,C., 130, 3rd ; W. Hickman, K.B.C., 180, ; H. E. 
Taylor, Brixton B.C., 160, ; H. H. Pearce, Kent B.C., 
215, ; C. Newcome (introduced), 225, ; F. Wilson, 
Lewisham W.B.C., 1 70, 0. Quirk rode in magnificent form, 
and caught all his men, with the exception of Williams, 
in the fourth lap, and, the former easing up, the pair rode 
in together. Some way behind a good straggle was going 
on for third place between English and Hickman, which the 
former gained by a foot. 

Fourth Heat : P. Vacani, S.B.C., 200, Ist ; H. Crawley, 
Ealing B.C., 250, 2nd ; A. R. Lockwood, S.B.C., 135, 8rd ; 
T. W. Young, P.B.a and A.C., 160, 0; H. B. Burrows 



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LONDON BICYCLE CLUB GAZETTE. 



(introduced), 160, 0; G. H. DoUery, S.B.C., 170, ; C. V. 
Potter, Hornsey B.C., 215, 0. Although refused per- 
mission, S. C. Budd, S.B.C., 140, who was late for his own 
heat, started in this and took second place, but was of 
course disqualified ; Vacani, who rode very well, gained 
first position by 15 yards. In consequence of Budd's dis- 
qualification, Crawley qualified for the final. 

Final Heat : W. Quirk, 1st ; E. H. Carr, 2nd : A. Her- 
bert, 3rd ; J. Williams, Junr., ; H. Crawley, ; W. 
Wyndham, ; P. Vacani, ; J. Grriffits, 0. Again Quirk's 
riding was splendid, and his victory was a most popular one. 
Wyndham, so far from making up any of the 50 yards he 
was conceding, lost quite 100 yards. Quirk gaining on him 
lap after lap. Everyone was disappointed at Wyndham's 
riding. He did not go at all in his old style, and failed to 
catch anyone to whom he gave starts. We fancy he has 
been doing too much lately, and requires rest. In the last 
lap a splendid race was going on, all but Wyndham being 
well togetlier, when Griffits, putting on a spurt, cut across 
Vacani's bows, and forced him on to the ropes, sending him 
a nasty purler, which deprived him of his chance of obtain- 
ing a prize and what little wind he had left. Griffits raced 
on, and secured second place, but Vacani having entered 
a protest, he was very properly disqualified by the Judge. 
If all judges would follow Mr. RUcker's example, and 
boldly disqualify anyone guilty of foul riding, the accidents 
which detract so much from the enjoyment of bicycle 
racing would be fewer. Whether the rules be broken in- 
tentionally or by carelessness, the punishment should be 
given all the same, as it is carelessness that causes most spills. 
Carr and Herbert have both improved, and after a Uttle 
practice will not require so much start. J. Williams would 
have done better had he not been riding a strange machine. 

The prizes were presented to successful competitors by 
Lady Lubbock, after which the company were somewhat 
wearied by long speeches from Sir John Lubbock and several 
other eminent bankers. The Royal Artillery Mounted 
Band, under the direction of Mr. J. Lawson, performed 
admirably, during the afternoon, a selection of music, which 
reflected great credit on the compiler. 

RACING FIXTURES. 

June 29 th. — ^London Athletic Club at Stamford Bridge. 
2 miles Handicap. Handicapper, M. D. 
Riicker, Jun. Entries (Ss non-Members, 
2s 6d Members) close June 15th, to Wm. 
Waddell, Hon. Sec, Mansion House 
Chambers, Queen Victoria Street. 

June 29th. — ^Beckenham C.C, on Cricket Club Ground 
(splendid grass course). 2 Miles Handicap. 
Handicapper, M. D. Riicker, Jun. Entries 
(2s Gd) close June 17th, to Allen H. Stone- 
ham, Hon. Sec, The Avenue, Beckenham. 
Practice allowed on the Ground two days 
before the race. 



RACING FIXTUBM^Continued.) 

July 13th. — ^Pickwick Bicycle Club, Alexandra Palace, 
2 miles Handicap. Entries (2s Gd) close 
July 6th, to L. C. B. Yeoman, 21, Gutter Lane, 
E.C. A fortnight's practice ticket issued to 
each competitor. 

July 20th.— Temple Bicycle Club, L. A.C. Grounds, Stam- 
ford Bridge. 1 Mile Handicap. Entries 
(28. 6d) close July 8th, to H. Etherington, 
East Temple Chambers, Whitefriars Street, 
Fleet Street. Handicapper, John Keen. 

July 27th.— Joint Stock Banks' Athletic Club, L.A.C. 
Grounds, Stamford Bridge. 4 miles Bicycle 
Handicap. Entries (2s. 6d.) close July 20th, 
to W. Basan, Hon. Sec, 28, Highbury New 
Park, N. 

July 27th. — ^Brighton Bicycle Club Race Meeting. 

Aug. 10th. — Stanley Bicycle Club Race Meeting at Alex- 
andra Palace. 

Aug. 17th. — ^Tower Hamlets Bicycle Club Race Meeting 
at Alexandra Palace. 



TO LITTLEHAMPTON AND BOGNOR. 
Down the Portsmouth road, through Godalming, to 
Milford, two miles beyond Godalming, here take the left^ 
hand road, and a quarter of a mile farther on, where the 
road forks, the left again ; this takes you to Petworth, 
about 15 miles from Godalming : surface rather lumpy at 
first, but improves towards Petworth. All the hills can be 
ridden up, but some of the runs down are rather rough. 
Good mn at Petworth, the " Swan." Petworth to Arundel, 
12 miles ; steep hill down out of the town ; surface rather 
loose to Bury, where a long ascent begins, rather worse than 
Hind Head. If coming the other way, this must not be 
ridden down, as there is a steep and rough comer at the 
bottom. Half a mile of level road on the top brings you 
to the gates of Arundel Park, through which bicyclists are 
admitted by asking at the lodge. This is a splendid run of 
about two miles, mostly down hill, with a road like a cinder 
path. When through the park, the left-hand road leads 
down through the town, steep hill, with town pump at the 
bottom. Straight on, over railway bridge, taking right- 
hand road at top of hill, through good lanes, to Little- 
hampton, which is a decidedly one-horse place. After 
crossing the ferry, the lanes are rather lumpy to Bognor, 
about seven miles. Good hotel, facing the sea, "The 
Norfolk.", Bognor is a good place to spend a quiet day by 
the sea, even at holiday-time the 'Arrystocracy being con- 
spicuous by their absence, Man repairs bicycles at Bognor : 
G. Hooker, Waterworks. To Chichester, six miles of good 
hard white road ; Chichester to Midhurst, 12 miles, fair 
going, one stiff hill down, with village at bottom ; Midhurst 
to Haslemere and Godalming, all up and down, and surface 
rather rough, good run down about three miles from 
Godalming. 



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Sfcarting at Chichester again, a splendid road to Havant, 
nine miles ; a quarter of a mile from Havant, where the 
road forks, the right-hand one leads to the top of Portsdown 
Hill, can he ridden the whole way. Keeping straight along 
the top, after a good run down, five miles brings you to 
Wickham : here turn sharp to the right before entering the 
village, and now an excellent road runs right to Alton. 

At West Meon, nine miles from Wickham, I can recom- 
mend the " Red Lion," a good tea being obtained for a 
shilling. This road, although so good, is very seldom used 
by bicyclists, the inhabitants being in a state of blighted 
ignorance respecting their performances ; mine host, for 
instance, held me with his glittering eye while he narrated 
a wild legend of some fellow having ridden 40 miles in 4^ 
hours, so, metaphorically speaking, I put in 0. Walmesley 
with the left, and following up] with A. D. Butler on the 
drum, left him absolutely blinded by the light let in upon 
his intellect. There are two long hills beyond West Meon» 
with good runs down. I met a 'cycling parson here. This 
gentleman, who is curate of Hambledon, does all his parish 
work on a bicycle ; he was riding a nice machine, made by 
a local genius — ^Lane, Dibden, near Hythe. I suspect that 
there are many of these local men, good at repairs, who waste 
their sweetness, etc., and if ''when found, members would 
make a note on/' it would make a valuable addition to the 
utility of the Gazette. Good inn at Alton, the " Swan." 
Can either return through Odiham, Blackwater, and Staines, 
or through Famham and Guildford. Good inn at Fam- 
bam, the " Lion and Lamb." 

W. R. Sbwbll. 



To the Editor of the London Bicycle Club Gazette. 
Tliere have appeared, from time to time, in the Gazette, 
lists of hotels and inns recommended to members, but I 
fail to see any utility in these occasional publications, 
unless somebody intends to compile a reeum^ so arranged 
as to serve as a useful reference. 

Many of us are now thinking about our holiday trips, 
and I am sure that if some of our great travellers would 
give us lists of some places of interest, and " the tip " for 
good accommodation, they would be rendering a real 
service to more inexperienced tourists. 

It would be interesting to know how many of us are 
going to Normandy this year, and what dates have been 
fixed for various tours. Sometimes members happen to be 
within a few miles of one another, and never know it until 
they meet months afterwards, and then come the mutual 
recriminations : " Why didn't you tell me you were going 
there ? " " How was I to know ? " etc. 



Perhaps our good Mr. Editor will rosenre a comer for 
this kind of '' fashionable intelligence," if he can get anjf ! 

* ♦ ♦ « * <k 

Would it not be an improvement, Messieurs the Captains 
of Districts, if you were to state the name of the hostelry 
where you intend to tea, when announcing the run for the 
following week in the Gazette ? There are always men 
who will and must come up late» And in large places it 
would enable them to find yoit befiire the marmalade is all 
gone. Will-o'-thb^Whbel. 



To the Editor of t/ie London Bicycle Club Gazette. 

Deab Sib, — ^Will you kindly mention, for the guidance 
of those members who propose to attend the 6e^eral Meet 
of the 13th July, and would like stable room for their 
bicycles on the Friday night, that Mr. Jolly, 37, Downs 
Road, Hackney Downs (near Dalston Junction or Hackney 
Downs Station), has kindly placed a coach-house at their 
disposal, and that I shall be happy to have any left here 
(close to the Wood Street Station, Great Eastern Railway). 

If any members care to come down and haw a ride 
before the somewhat late hour fixed for meeting, I shall ba 
glad to act as guide, and shall be home by two o'clock. 
Yours faithfully, 
Francis Godlee, N. E. District Captain. 

Whip's Gross, Walthamstow, 25th June, 1878. 



To the Editor of the London Bicycle Club Gazette. 

Sir—'' Strike while the iron's hot '* is a well-worn 
maxim, and it must be my apology for ofiTering yotir readers 
some opinions and suggestions on 4>ur recent race meeting. 
Notwithstanding what " the papers " may say in our praise, 
this year's meeting was not so well attended as most of us 
could wish to see it, and it is to be feared that the events 
were not of a sufficiently entertaining character to induce 
visitors, especially ladies, to come from long distances on 
the next occasion. 

It is perhaps inevitable, but much to be r^etted, that 
the winning post cannot be immediately [in firont of the 
grand stand, instead of being so placed that the majority 
cannot tell who has won. I speak from experience, for 
otherwise why should one hear speculative remarks all 
around, such as " Appleyard has won ! " — " No, it's Thorn ! " 
— " A dead heat ! " etc. The ground is, no doubt, badly 
adapted to bicycle racing, and I think those who rode 
will bear me out in saying Lillie Bridge is in every way 
preferable. 

At the risk of being put down for a grumbler, I musi 
mention some other arrangements which would bear im^ 
provement ; and be it understood I speak on behalf of tkft 
outsiders and the ladies who come to be amused, but who. 



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LONDON BICYCLE CLUB GAZETTE. 



as a rule, not being familiar with the dress and charac* 
teristics of the competitors, soon give up all hope of 
"following" the race. 

When they see three or four men in black, and three or 
four more in white, racing rapidly round, it becomes very 
difficult to mark the man who has the best of it. I may 
add, that when several competitors get overlapped the 
spectator's confusion does not decrease. Jockeys wear very 
marked distinctions, so have boats and their crews— why 
should not bicyclists ? Some suggest tliat members of our 
club should all wear black for racing. By all means let 
them; but that rule would not preclude them from 
wearing an additional distinctive colour where several 
"Blackamoors" are competitors. Cindeb. 



To the Editor of the London Bicycle Club Gazette, 

Sir — It is with some diffidence that I ask you, if it be 
possible, to insert these few lines in an early number of the 
Club Gazette. I am aware that the recital of personal 
adventure and mishaps is often of little interest save to the 
professional menders of broken bicycles and bones, except 
in those cases which illustrate the general questioh of the 
rights and wrongs of bicyclists. 

I fear that had I courted an accident I could hardly have 
pitched upon a better day — the Thursday between the 
Derby and the Oaks. The road Smitham Bottom, near 
Croydon. I was travelling at that gentle pace which timid 
beginners affect, when I became aware that two dogcarts 
were rapidly nearing me. As I faced them, one was on my 
extreme left, the other well on the right. The occupants 
of these carts were evidently in a jovial condition, and per* 
haps a little thoughtless in their cups, for as the unlucky 
'cyclist tried to steer his way between the traps, one of the 
riders seized a whip by the thong, and taking a shot at the 
passing wheel .... 

When I recovered I was in the ditch by the roadside, and 
my light-hearted friends were far on the road to Croydon. 
And I, now that my scars are healed, meditate calmly on 
what I ought to have done. I could not take my own side, 
that was taken already ; the only open space was between 
the carts. And yet I believe that, had the accident been a 
fair one — a collision for instance — I should have found 
myself in the wrong box, as I should most certainly have 
been on the wrong side of one of the two carts. 

I am induced to think, sir, that if we bicyclists were 
properly licensed bicycle-drivers and if our 'cycles paid 
tolls (in their degree) as other vehicles do, we should 
acquire a stronger legal existence and strong legal rights. 
Dear to the British rough, whether in dogcart or donkey- 
cart, or hobnailed boots, is the cheap assault on feeble 
women or helpless 'cyclists, but if that same assault cost 
him but a ten-pound note, I think the B. K. would allow 
himself less frequently than at present such expensive, if 
exciting, luxuries. — ^I am. Sir, your obedient servant, S. 



To the Editor of the London Bicycle Club Qazette. 
Sib, — In reply to " Mucker," if he desires one of the ex- 
pensive distance gauges, he will find Stanton's patent 
bicycle log much the best. It records quarter miles up to 
65 miles, and can always be re-set at zero at the commence- 
ment of a journey. It also fits any sized hub. (2) Let 
" Mucker " try a washer between his hind-pin nut and the 
fork, and if this will not do, if he wipes all oil o£f the thread, 
and rusts it with salt and water, the nut will keep on 
firmly. — Yours, &c., 

BUNKKB. 



To the Editor of the London Bicycle Club Gazette. 

Sib, — ^Why should custom condemn us in bicycling 
alone, of all athletic sports, to wear more clothing than we 
find comfortable? At cricket we wear flannel shirt and 
trousers, and such hat or cap as suits our fancy. In rowing 
we wear the thinnest jersey we can find, and flannel trou- 
sers. When I used to play football (association rules) I 
recollect I never wore anything thicker than a flannel shirt, 
unless it was a frost, and never wore a cap. I see men at 
hare and hounds in a hard frost with jerseys hardly thick 
enough to be decent, shorts, and no stockings or socks. 
Why should bicyclists wear coats in warm weather? 
Nothing could be better than our uniform in a frost, but 
in warm weather it is unbearable ; and when gloves, collar, 
and necktie are added, as at the Hampton Court Meet, 
it is simply torture to any warm-blooded mortal, and I, for 
one, cannot stand it. Fancy the procession of boats at 
Oxford or Cambridge, with all the men in caps and gowns 
and dogskin gloves ! Fancy a cricket match in which 
every man was bound to wear a coat, collar, and necktie ! 
Fancy a gymnastic performance in which every man had to 
wear some sort of a hat or c«p ! Yet these are not more 
preposterous than what we have to suffer. In the coldest 
weather I never wear waistcoat, gloves, collar, or anything 
round my neck, and in moderate weather I am comfortable 
with a flannel coat. 

I suppose some cold-blooded man, who never rode up a 
hill in his life, will say, " If this is allowed we shall soon 
have bicycling falling into disrepute." Why so ? No other 
sport has fallen into disrepute because suitable clothing 
was worn. — ^Your obedient servant, 

H. Shabpe. 

30, Well Walk, Hampstead, 23rd June, 1878. 



To tlie Editor of the London Bicycle Club Gazette. 
Sir, — I fancy that " Juncker's" question, "Wliich is the 
best cyclometer, Johnson's or Thompson's ? " could only be 
fairly answered by one who has used both. But, as I have 
carried Johnson's for the last year, and have tested it 
thoroughly by comparison with milestones and by other 
observations, I can say that it is perfectly reliable, and 



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98 



works admirably. There are diflferences as to external ap- 
pearance and minor details, son^e for, and some against, 
each make. Johnson's, I believe, is the dearest, but it is 
better looking. I should prefer the mode of attachment 
adopted for Thompson's (a screw clamp on middle of axle), 
if there were no chance of breakage. Johnson's fastens 
with one strap and buckle round the axle, and another 
round several spokes. This is secui^e^ but it is not quite 
tight unless some strain is put on the spokes, which would 
be objectionable. 

Then, as to registering revdutions or miles, opinions 
difTer. At first sight the balance of convenience appears to 
be in favour of miles, but my experience points the other 
way. The (ictual'me of wheels generally varies somewhat 
from the nominal size. I ride two machines, both 52's. 
TheoreticaUy, each of them should travel a mile in 387 
revolutions ; practically, one of them makes 392 or 393 
revolutions in a mile. The second machine makes fewer. 
As it is a new one, I have not had full opportunity of 
testing this, but the number appears to be about 385. A 
thicker (or even a stiffer) rubber would make a difiference, 
and of course the rolling of the wheel must be taken into 
account. 

I don't find the calculation of distance from revolutions 
to be any inconvenience ; with practice it comes almost 
mechanically. 

I should be glad to give " Juncker " fuller details, and to 
show him my metre, which can be done readily if he ever 
attends W. or S.W. Meets. 

Flobizel. 

June 15th, 1878. 



We take on ourselves to reply to the inquiry of " Mucker," 
in last week's issue, on the subject of cyclometers. Every 
man probably holds his own particular kind of cyclometer 
to be the best, so we will content ourselves with giving our 
reasons for the belief that Johnson's revolution indicator is 
superior to any other. As compared with Thompson's it 
has this great advantage : with Johnson's on the wheel you 
may spin the wheel the reverse way, whenever it is desired 
to test its running, vrithout causing any change in the 
index. Thompson's, on the other hand, runs backwards 
under such circumstances, and as it is often necessary so 
to test the running of the machine, the superiority of 
Johnson's Indicator, whether " mileage " or " revolution," 
is evident. 

With regard to the respective merits of "revolution" 
and " mileage " indicators, we would remark that the latter 
are only suitable to machines of certain size. They are 
worked out for 52, 54, 56-in. machines, etc., but if the 
wheel varies even a quarter of an inch (and how few 
machines vary as little ?) the difference is about one mile 
ia 100. Again, men constantly change their machines (we 
have had four in two years), and often keep two or more of 



various sizes, for fine and wet weather, and so on, and of 
course a "mileage" indicator suitable to one is utterly 
useless for another. 

It is only necessary, with the "revolution" indicator, 
to test the revolutions of your machine carefully once or 
twice over as straight and level a mile of road as is handy, 
and then work out a common sum, and note the miles up 
to, say, 100 miles, on a card. 

We have met with chaff because of our calculations 
(which, N.B., we always make on our shirt cuff), but we 
have the satisfaction of perfect accuracy in the result. 

What is really wanted is an indicator which can be set 
to zero at pleasure, and which records revolutions only. 
All deductions of previous figures from the index at the 
journey's end would then be dispensed with. 

Our captain is the patentee of a " mileage" indicator which 
permits of this re-setting, and is neat to look at, but it 
admits of improvement in one or two respects, and we want 
to see if he cannot bring out such a clock as we suggest. 

P.S. We hear that Mr. Riicker intends to act on our 
hint. 



EXCHANGE LIST. 



(Two Insertions^ not exceeding three lines, for Is,) 

58-in. Stassen, front-wheel brake, new lost season, price 
£12.— J. F. Marchant, 59, Bemers-street, W. 

Fifty-four inch Keen Eclipse racing machine, new last 
year, warranted sound and perfect. Price j^IO lOs. — ^T. 
Heath, Thombank, The Common, Sutton. 

For Sale. 52-in. Keen's " Eclipse," built Sept., 1877. 
Roller bearings. Used occasionally during six montlis. 
Price £11. May be seen by appointment at 2, Uxbridge 
Koad, Surbitou. — Gerard Smith, Glenarm House, Upper 
Clapton. 

For Sale, 55-in. " Timberlake," all bright, patent front 
brake and roller bearings. Very little used. May be seen 
at Peake's, 11, Princes Street, Leicester Square. Price 
iEll 10s. 

Large size " Stassen " circular wheel bag, in perfect condi- 
tion.— W. J. Williams, 23, Highbury Place. 

As I intend giving up racing I will sell my 54-inch 
thoroughbred " Stassen " for £U, cost i*18 short time ago. 
Hunted regularly with the crack Kew Bridge Pack. — 
H. V. Cleaver. 

For Sale. 56-inch Keen's "Eclipse " racer, has just been 
repainted and done up. Price only £lO. W. Wyndham, 
Keigate. 

For Sale, 52-inch " Special Challenge," new last year, 
and still in good condition. Carter brake. Price £12. 
H. R. Boyce, 35, Warrington Crescent, W. 

For Sale, cheap, 56-inch racing "Humber." Address 
Gilbert F. Beck, Chislehurst, Kent. 



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' T engage done tous d ^ter dans leura ecriis toute persannalit^, toute allusion depassant Us limites de la discussion la 

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Vol. L No. 15.] 



Edited by A. OGIER WARD. [Thursday, July 4, 1878. 



CONTENTS. 



PAOB 

OfficUl Notice 99 

Roadflide Wit 99 

Notices: Race Meeting— Northampton Decision 100 

Committee 100 

Saturday Runs 100 

That Awful Wind 102 

Notice of General Meet, July 13 102 



London Athletic Club Sports 102 

Upchurch Marsh, and how we did not go there 103 

London Bicycle Club Meets 104 

Double Acrostics 104 

Racing Fixtures 104 

Exchange List 105 

Coirespondence 105 



NOTICE. 

In consequence of the sudden illness of the Editor, some 
diiGculty has been experienced in issuing the present 
number at its appointed date. All who have witnessed the 
hearty and untiring energy of Mr. A. 0. Ward wherever 
the interests of the Club or this Gazette were concerned 
will share our regrets at the unfortunate cause of this delay. 

We beg again to remind members that any accounts of 
race meetings or tours will be gratefully received. We 
understand that the retiring modesty of many suggests to 
them that the plain unvarnished tale they have to tell 
would be but little likely to interest their brethren of the 
Club, but we hereby warn them to allow such mistaken 
modesty to retire altogether. There are few runs or tours 
which are not enlivened by incidents often instructive and 
always interesting. Nor should there be as yet any want 
of matter. We will engage ourselves to issue a notice 
when all the roads and combinations of roads for, say, a 
hundred miles round London have been thoroughly ex- 
plored by the L.B.C., and we trust that the energy of the 
above-named ** retiring " members will help us to do this 
at some not too distant date. 



ROADSIDE WIT. 

There are few, if any, of our readers who have not, at 
one time or another of their bicycling career, had the 
honour of playing the part of target to the wit and graceful 
humour of that portion of the British Public which haunts 



the outskirts of villages and hangs about the ale-house 
doors and market places, apparently in the dim if somewhat 
sodden hope that Providence may send a bicyclist in their 
path. Other functions in life or reasons for existence they 
appear to have none, and the types of face and slouch are 
so few that the same knot of virtuous villagers who have 
chaffed and thrown stones in Slowborough would seem to 
turn up again in Mudborough; a few miles off, only to re- 
appear after an hour's steady drive — still chaffing and 
stoniug^-outside the "Pig and Whistle" in Little Ped- 
lington. To these must be added their progeny, who, if 
less stolid, are more mischievous and dangerous ; who know 
exactly how a sheep may be driven under a bicycle or a 
pig into it, and in what manner their own inexpensive 
head-covering may, with small loss to themselves, be con- 
verted into a dangerous and dreaded missile. 

When the wit and humour of these persons does not 
take the form of practical joking, it is somewhat melancholy 
to reflect on the utter want of originality shown by these 
children of the soiL Their playful sallies might be 
numbered on the fingers, and the bicyclist would probably 
find, after a fifty miles run, that he had been favoured say 
twenty times with Joke No. 6, fifteen times with Joke No. 9, 
not forgetting Joke No. 1 about the wheel going round, 
which would be in great demand at something above thirty. 
These standard witticisms, flavoured according to the taste 
of the jester with occasional touches of blasphemy and 
local bad language, form the stock in trade of our country 
critics. Repartee is useless, for it does not penetrate. 



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LONDON BICYCLE CLUB GAZETTE. 



Wembley Park, and Harrow Road, through Harlesden 
Green. Distance from head-quarters 27 miles. At Ealing 
Common Dr. Langmore joined us, and Bacon having 
followed in our track caught us up in the Kenton Lane 
when "refreshing." The run was much enjoyed, and I 
think if members only knew the pleasures of these evening 
runs they would attend them more frequently. Members 
present : W. T. Tliom, junr.. Dr. Langmore, H. C. Freeth, 
A. J. Bacon, and W. J. F. Potts. 

W. A. Smith, District Captain. 



THAT AWFUL WIND. 
Having a long-standing invitation to visit some friends 
down west, and wishing, of course, to accomplish the jour- 
ney on my bicycle, I sought a map of England, roughly 
measured the distance, came to the conclusion that it was 
a fair day's ride, and, after making arrangements for taking 
a whole holiday on Saturday, started about seven p.m. on 
Friday, accompanied by my brother, with the intention of 
getting a few miles on our journey that evening. We only 
got as far as Staines, where we retired early to bed, bent on 
an early start next morning. We woke betimes, and were 
very much disappointed to find a strong west wind blowing; 
however, we dressed, and went down stairs, and were kept 
waiting so long for breakfast that we should have done 
better had we started from home without it, besides saving 
our hotel bill, which contained a large charge for " attend- 
ance," meant no doubt for our ivaiting for breakfast. 
However, we did manage to start at last, and perceiving 
that a route through Datchet came out into the Bath road 
at Slough, rode through Maidenhead, and, turning right- 
handed, made our way to Henley, where we refreshed the 
inner man for the first time. We then took the Oxford 
road for a few miles, and then, bearing to the left and 
breasting a very steep hill, crossed the Thames again at 
Wallingford, after a very pretty ride, which was quite new 
to me, after leaving the Oxford road. It was then about 
mid-day, so I asked a respectable-looking old gentleman if 
he could tell me a good place to get some lunch. He 

recommended the , which we went to, and found the 

old gentleman was quite right, as indeed he ought to have 
been, for he was the landlord. During lunch, my brother, who 
was quite a lad, and had not done much riding for some 
time, said he really could not face the wind much longer, 
so, after due consultation and bill settling, we started for 
Didcot Station, where we arrived all safely, and finished 
our journey by train. We were very loth to do so, as the 
country and roads were remarkably pretty ahead, but the 
wind was certamly a teazer. I 'don't remember to have 
ever read any account of runs in that immediate neighbour- 
hood, but it seemed to me to be a fine field for the big 
wheel, and I hope some time this season I may find myself 
in that neighbourhood with a favourable wind. 

Abgsie, L.B.C. 



GENERAL MEET, 13th July. 

As we cannot have accommodation at Chigwell, tea will 
be arranged at some other place, probably the " Thatched 
House," Epping. This will not in any way affect the time 
and place of starting. Final notice of destination will 
appear in next week's Gazette. 

Francis Godlee. i 

S.W. District Spbcul Notice. 

As it has been decided to hold a general meet in the 
N.E. District on Saturday, July 18th, members are in- 
formed that the S.W. will meet at Kingston Bridge at 
6 p.m.,' and ride to Branthwaite House, Downs Road, 
Clapton, where Mr. Jolly has kindly consented to house 
bicycles for the night. The return journey will, of course, 
be made by train, and a pleasant evening is anticipated. 
Coleman, Hutchings (who has undertaken the duties of 
pilot), and the District Captain will certainly be there, and 
one or two others who intend to return the compliment 
the N.E. have hitherto paid other Districts in attending 
runs in their county. 

B.. G. Trollope, District Captain. 



LONDON ATHLETIC CLUB. 

The well-known grounds at Stamford Bridge were again 
crowded with a very fasliionable assemblage of ladies and 
members (about 2,500), to see the various kinds of sports 
at the Second Summer Meeting, on Saturday last, the 
29th June. Amongst other sports was a Two Miles Bicycle 
Handicap, which, owing to the splendid handicapping of 
our worthy Captain, Mr. M. D. Rucker, Junr., turned out 
a brilliant success. We have seen a good many final heats, 
but must say we never saw such a close finish, where every 
man was so well up. Between the first and sixth there was 
only 10 yards. After the second lap the cheering com- 
menced, and was kept up in one continual roar till the 
finish, which just shows how very popular bicycling is 
getting amongst amateurs on the cinder path. We think 
the London Athletic Club did a very good day's work when 
they permitted bicycle races at their sports, and we hope 
that such encouragement afi they got last Saturday will 
determine them to have a bicycle race at all their meetings. 
Appended is a return of the racing. 

1st Heat: T. East, Surrey B.C., scratch, 1st; C. J. 
Turner, L.B.C., 2nd; L. A. Buist, Belsize B.C., 3rd; 
W. McWilliam, 90 yards, ; R. V. K. Stewart, Druids' B.C., 
200, ; H. H. Francis, Druid's B.C., 260, ; R. D. Isaacs, 
L.A.C., 285, 0. Only three men came to the post in this 
heat, which unfortunately was not of much account 
Turner passed Buist at the end of 1^ laps, and riding very 
well maintained his lead for some time ; East, who was 
riding in very good form indeed, managed to overhaul 
Buist at the end of the sixth lap, and spurting well in the 



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final straight caught Turner 15 yards from home, and won 
by 1^ yards, Buist half a lap behind. Time, 6 mins. 37 sees. 
We may as well mention that there being a very strong 
easterly wind blowing all the afternoon made it very 
hard work down the straight run in. 

Second Heat :— E. W. P. Cambridge, L.A.C., 160 yards, 
1st; W. S. Buist, L.B.C., 245, 2nd; J. WiUiams, Junr., 
L.B.C., 265, 3rd ; A. J. Wilkinson, LB-C, 200, ; M. 
Pritchard, Druids' B.C., 260, ; W. S. Steggall, Druids' 
B.C., 280, 0. Buist, riding in very good form, made the. 
running at starting, and secured first position at the end of 
third lap, Williams coming up fast, and Wilkinson, who 
seemed to labour very hard, was gradually losing ground 
(we are glad to see another member make a start on the 
cinder path, but think they should practise spurting a little 
bit more, which is bound to stand them in some day when 
wanted). Cambridge, riding very well, ran into second 
place in the sixth lap, made another try in the last, and 
landed a clever winner by one yard ; 20 yards between 
second and third. Time 6mins. 32| sees. 

Third Heat— W. T. Thorn, L.B.C., 50 yards, 1st; 
G. Frazer, Belsize B.C., 300, 2nd ; A. D. Butler, L.B.C., 250, 
3rd ; P. Vacani, Surrey B.C., 200, ; S. Kemp, Pickwick 
B.C., 230, ; E. C. Koch, L.B.C., 250, ; C. W. Fagan, 
Druids' B.C., 275, ; D. Young, L.B.C., 280, 0. Frazer 
with his long start kept the lead for some time, Butler ran 
into third place at the end of the first lap, and Thorn, 
coming up at a tremendous, pace, soon cut down some of his 
men, and at the end of six laps managed to get into fourth 
place, a good race going on between Frazer, Koch, and 
Butler. At the commencement of the last lap the order 
was — Frazer, Butler, Thorn, the others well up. Thorn, 
reserving himself for the final run in, passed Butler half a 
lap from home, and just caught Frazer a few yards from 
home, and won a splendid race by a yard, 30 yards be- 
tween second and third, l^me 6 mins. 25} sees. 

Final Heat : East, 1st ; Cambridge, 2nd ; Buist, 3rd ; 
Thorn, 4th ; Turner, 5th ; Frazer, 6th. All made a very 
good start, the limit men meaning business by starting 
ofif at a great pace, Frazer leading at the end of the 
second lap, with Buist and Turner in close attendance. 
At the end of the first mile the order was — ^Frazer, Turner, 
Buist ; Cambridge, Thorn, and East closing up very fast. 
Turner ran into first place in the fifth lap ; just at the 
same time East passed Thorn, Cambridge going on very 
fast. The excitement now became intense, as at the 
beginning of the last lap it looked like anybody's race ; 
the order as the bell rang was — Buist, Turner, Cambridge, 
Frazer, East, Thorn. Cambridge passed Turner very 
soon, and overhauled Buist at the top end; but East, 
putting on a magnificent spurt down the straight, rushed 
past Cambridge and landed a winner by 1^ yards — 1 yard 
between second and third. Thorn half-yard behind Buist, 
Turner and Frazer close up behind. 



UPCHURCH MARSH, AND HOW WE DID NOT 
GO THERE. 

As the result of reading that capital book, " The Gelt, 
the Roman, and the Saxon," and having acquired a morbid 
desire to obtain relics of the Roman period, I have, for the 
last twelve months, looked forward to visiting the marshes 
at Upchurch, near Sittingboume, Kent. Here is the site of 
what was an extensive pottery 2,000 years ago, and for 
several miles extends a stratum of ceramic debris, covered 
by a yard of soft earth. This area is on the right bank of 
the Medway, and hardly raised above its level at high tide. 
Into this drowned land the river cuts many gullies, and 
from their sides may be extracted the treasures which I 
sought. Like the golden apples in the fabled garden, their 
value is enhanced by the difficulty in reaching them. 
However, after one or two solitary attempts in the spring 
of the year, I began to feel that a more vigorous effort 
should really be made. My previous faUures were caused 
by the toilsome length of the road, which caused anti- 
quarian ardour to give place to a vulgar but irrestible desire 
for food, and subsequent lazy pipes. However, having 
secured a few days back the society of our Western Captain, 
whose manifold tastes lead him to take a profound interest 
in everything, whether in the heavens above, the earth 
beneath, or in the waters under the earth, it was resolved 
that an early start should be made, say at 4 or 5 a.m. ; but 
**rhomm$ propose" and 7 o'clock saw us still snoring. 
Then came breakfast, and an unsuccessful attempt to 
extract the S.E. Captain from his flowery den ; like a wise 
man he preferred his bed of roses to a wild goose quest after 
rubbish and brickbats in the far marshes. On the top of 
Shooter's Hill we lay up for the rain, and over the spring 
which gushes from its summit theW.D. Captain established 
himself, a tutelary genius, dispensing oatmeal and water to 
all thirsty pilgrims who, by his solicitations, could be in- 
duced to drink. The rain ceased, and Dartford was shortly* 
reached, out of which the stiff hill on the east side was 
negotiated. Being then on the old Roman Watling Street 
we resolved to trace it, and followed it up firom the point 
where it quits the main road, half a mile from Dartford, 
till it vanished in Swanscombe Park Wood. We were 
greatly impressed by the determined manner in which it 
went straight ahead, over hill and dale, diverted by 
no obstacle from ite direct line. Having reached South 
Fleet, a mile or two south of Gravesend, we debated 
whether to proceed or to put ofif our proposed run. 
The weather was very stormy ; the wind blew hard out 
from the east. We were hungry, and so we yielded. Made 
tracks for the "Commercial," near the Terrace Pier, Graves- 
end, where we fared very well, spending a jolly afternoon, 
lying down by the water-side on the pier enjoying straw- 
berries we had prudently purchased, et cum muUis pipis. 
The firesh S.E. wind against the beginning of the ebb 



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LONDON BICYCLE CLUB GAZETTE. 



caused a pleasant lop in mid-stream, and brought down the 
yachts and barges at a rattling pace. 

So we agreed that many less agreeable ways of spending 
an afternoon could be found, and that a Club run might 
very well be made to the same spot. Leaving Gravesend 
at 5.20, we pegged away busily up and down the many hills 
between it and Blackheath, which we ran into at 7.30. To 
the eastward of Shooter's Hill no rain had fallen ; between 
it and London the roads were almost washed away. 

. Ashley Barrett. 

london'bicycle"club~meets. 

July 13.— General Meet. 
N.E. District, — Top of Lea Bridge Road (near Dalstou 

and Hackney Downs Stations), at 4.30 p.m., for 

Cliigwell, by Epping Forest. 
N.W. District— " Jack Straw's Castle," at 3.30 p.m. 

Meet other District at Syborn's Corner. 
W, District, — Top of Lea Bridge Road, 4.30 p.m., for 

Chigwell (by train). 
S,W. District— To^ of Lea Bridge Road, 4.30 p.m., for 

Chigwell (by train). 
S,E. District (Croydon Division). — Top of Lea Bridge 

Road. 4.30 p.m., for Cliigwell (by train). 
S,E, District (Blackheath Division). — Top of Lea Bridge 

Road, 4.30 p.m., for Chigwell (by train). 
July 20. 
N, E. District — ^Lea Bridge Road, 3. 30 p.m. for Upminster. 
N. W. District-^'' Jack Straw's Castle," at 4.0 p.m., for 

Rickmansworth. 
W. District — Kew Green, at 4.0 p.m., for Bumham 

Beeches. Meet S.W. District at Harlington Corner 

at 4.45. 
S.W. District.—'' The Clarence," Tcddington, at 4.0 p.m., 

for Bumham Beeches. Meet W. District at Har- 
lington Corner, at 4.45. 
S,E. District (Croydon Division). — Central Croydon Station, 

at 4.0. p.m., for Westerham via Sandersted. 
S.E. District (Blackheath Division). — Foot of College Park 

Hill, Lewisham, for Westerham via Bromley. 

July 27. 

N.E, District — ^Lea Bridge Road, at 3.30 p.m., for Ougar. 

N,W. District.— '' J&ck Straw's Castle," at 4.0 p.m., for 

Hatfield via Mims. 
W. District — Kew Green, at 4.0 p.m., for Horseley Towers 

via Leatherhead, return by Ockham. 
S.W. District. — Surbiton Station, at 4.0 p.m., for Dorking. 

Meet S.E. District. 
S.E. District (Croydon Division). — Central Croydon Station, 

at 3.45 p.m., for Dorking. Meet S.W. District. 
S.E, District (Blackheath Division).— Foot of College Park 

Hill, Lewisham, for Sevenoaks. 

I purpose riding down to the neighbourhood of Fareliam 
on tne night of the 12th, leaving London (Eew) about 
10 p.m. (full moon), and sliall be glad of company ; pace 
easy, as I shall ride the " pony." W. A. Smith. 



DOUBLE ACROSTICS. 

1. Of building stone it is the mart. 
From thence the bicyclists do start. 

2. A well-known island off the north-west coast. 
Of which our Scottish friends may justly boast. 

3. A capital thing when you comers go round, 

'Twill save you from sprawling at length on the ground. 

4. Wlierever I travel, whatever I meet, 

I never make journeys with less than three feet. 

5. In classical music a very great name. 
His violin studies are well known to fame. 

6. If Members of Parliament kept me in view. 

They'd get back to their slumbers before half-past two. 

7. A heroine well known to some. 
The little friend of Uncle Tom. 

8. What spiritualists wait to hear. 

But when it comes makes few things clear. 

9. At Aldershot the last I saw, 
A useful man in time of war. 

10. What our Clubmen often their shoulders surround, 
When the rain comes down heavy and waters the ground. 

11. Put your foot through the spokes and come hard on 

the ground, 
And you'll find that you've made one ; of that I'll be 
bound. 

llie answers to last week's Acrostic will be noticed in 
our next number. 



RACING FIXTURES. 

July 13th. — Pickwick Bicycle Club, Alexandra Palace, 
2 miles Handicap. Entries (2s 6d) close 
July 6th, to L. C. B. Yeoman, 21, Gutter Lane, 
E.C. A fortnight's practice ticket issued to 
each competitor. 

July 20th.— Temple Bicycle Club, L.A.C. Grounds, Stam- 
ford Bridge. 1 Mile Handicap. Entries 
(2s. 6d) close July 8th, to H. Etherington, 
East Temple Chambers, Whitefriars Street, 
Fleet Street. Handicapper, John Keen. 

July 27th.— Joint Stock Banks' Athletic Club, L.A.C. 
Grounds, Stamford Bridge. 4 miles Bicycle 
Handicap. Entries (2s. 6d.) close July 20th, 
tx) W. Basan, Hon. Sec, 28, Highbury New 
Park, N. 

July 27th. — Brighton Bicycle Club Race Meeting. 

Aug. 10th.~Stanley Bicycle Club Race Meeting at Alex- 
andra Palace. 

Aug. 17th.-T-Tower Hamlets Bicycle Club Race Meeting 
at Alexandra Palace. 

Teip to Scotland. — Will. T. Thorn, jun., intends 
riding to Tarbet, on Loch Lomond, via Edinburgh. He 
will start on Saturday, September 14th, from 11, I^broke 
Square, at four p.m. Any members wishing to join, 
should let him know at the above address, tie will be 
most likely away for a fortnight. 



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105 



EXCHANGE LIST. 
(Two Insertions^ not exceeding three lines, for Is.) 

58-in. Stassen, front-wheel brake, new last season, price 
£12. — J. F. Marchant, 59, Bemers-street, W. 

For Sale. 56-mcli Keen's " Eclipse " racer, has just been 
repainted and done up. Price only iBlO. W. Wyndham, 
Keigate. 

For Sale, 52-inch " Special Challenge," new last year, 
and still in good condition. Carter brake. Price f 12. 
H. R. Boyce, 35, Warrington Crescent, W. 

For Sale, cheap, 56-inch racing "Humber." Address 
Gilbert F. Beck, Chislehurst, Kent. 



[The Editor will be much obliged if all letters intended 
for insertion in a given week are posted so as to reach him 
by Tuesday morning at the latest.] 

The following has been forwarded to us, through a 
member of the Club, from a foreign friend on a tour in 
England. 

Au Redacteur da London Bicycle Club Gazette, 

My friend, M. X., of your most excellent wheeling Club, 
has informed me that if I put to you one or two questions, 
I may expect from some of you the favour of an answer. 
If your skies do permit (and allow me to say the variation 
Ls most surprising) I propose to make a little journey of 
four days' duration from Torquay to London. Will it be 
too much that I ask what road is least among the hills and 
yet most pleasing to the view. I do not like the uphill to 
climb, M. le Redacteur, but I do not so much mind if it is 
good what is at the top. Then you have the macadam, 
which is tant soit peu brusque^ for those to it unaccustomed. 
This, if it can be done sans grand detour, I should in great 
measure fly from with glee. 

Again, at what inns, in what places (with a tariff mostly 
reasonable) may I stop on the way. 

I hope I may not be thought of as too forward, if I send 
to you the one little hint I have by me on your otherwise 
so well managed affairs. My friend, who is of yours, was 
with me riding in the hot time last week, and did hb best 
to catch for himself a coup-de-scleil by wearing a little blue- 
nearly-black cap, not one small protection at all. He said 
it was uniform, and de rigueur. Might a visitor to your 
land of common-sense gently plead that under a hot sun 
it is not good to increase and concentrate the heat on the 
head. I speak under all reserves, but my friend he was 
rather ill. 

With so many thanks for your courteous printing of this 
my poor correspondence. — Agr^ez, M. le Bicdacteur Tassur- 
ance de ma consideration distingude, 

CrCLOMANE. 



To the Editor of the London Bicycle Club Gazette. 

Sir,— Should any member of the L.B.C. contemplate 
riding to the Paris Exhibition, or going on from thence to 
Switzeriand, I shall be very pleased to give him any infor- 
mation in my power concerning hills, distances, hotels, 
objects of interest, etc., on the roads through France and 
in Switzerland, which I travelled over last autumn. This 
could be done either ^personally in the city, by letter, or, if 
considered by you of sufficient general interest, through the 
columns of the Gazette. I know of two of the best routes 
to Paris and Switzerland, viz., that via Dieppe, Paris, and 
B&le, and vid Havre, Paris, Pontarlier, and NeuchAtel. 

I intend spending my annual holiday, for the third time, 
abroad this year, and shall start, I think, about the 1st 
September, with the idea of visiting some of the charming 
little seaside places on the coast of Normandy and Brittany, 
and shall be glad of a companion, or even three if it can 
be so arranged. I may as well say that distances will be 
easy, and certainly under 50 miles per day. — ^Yours truly, 

N. B. MoiiRis. 

Oak Hill House, Hampstead, 
July 1st, 1878. 



To the Editor of the London Bicycle Club Gazette, 

Dear Sir, — Eocperentia docet, and happy the man who 
learns by the experience of others, and not by his own. 
Many of the members may have seen what are called 
'' Filet " jerseys sold about town (there is a shop in Grace- 
church Street where they are specially sold), and probably 
may have thought them worth a trial. To such my expe- 
rience may be of use. It is my misfortune to perspire 
frightfully when riding, and I naturally thought that one 
of these patent jerseys would be just the thing for me. 
Consequently I bought one last Wednesday, and wore it at 
the W. Meet. Unfortunately, however, they are made of 
cotton, and take off the perspiration only to present it to 
your skin again in the shape of a cold wet rag. I was in 
misery all the time I wore the thing, and haye been ex- 
pecting a severe cold ever since. Yesterday it presented 
itself in the shape of a severe attack of nettle-rash, which 
I am afraid may bother me for some time to come. — ^Trust- 
ing this may be of use to others, believe me, yours sincerely, 

12, BeLsize lload, July 1st, 1878. A. J. Bacon. 



To the Editor of the London Bicycle Club Gazette. 

Sir, — Be General N.E. Meet. — ^Why should we go from 
Lea Bridge Comer to Chigwell by train f It is a pleasant 
ride, bar about a mile of macadam. Is it too late to be 
changed ? — Yours &c. 

Anti-Trahost. 



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AND SUNDRIES. 

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IMMEDIATE DELIVERY. 
Write for Particulars and Price Lists. 



TRICYCLES for Ladies or Gentlemen. 
YOUTHS' BICYCLE S. 

GOV'S CLUB ROOM, 

MOST CKNTBALLT SITUATED. 

Offered FREE to Officers of all Clubs to amoge Matches, 
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THE ALERT BICYCLE FOR »878. 

The only Bicyele that is fitted with an Adjustable Roller Bearing, eveiy 

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For further |»rticulars apply to the Manufacturer, 

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CHAXFIOK ONfAMKNTAL BIDKB. 

THE EMPRESS 

Is acknowledged as the best Roadster. Strong, durable, and easy run- 
ning. Always gives satisfaction. Strongly recommended by members 
of London Bicycle and other Clubs. 

Sole Agent: T. A. SM UT, DA LSTOH JUVCTIOH, E. 

THE NORWOOD. 

A newly-designed light Roadster. A vety elegant machine. Will 
stand plenty of work. Weight of 52-inch, 40 lb. City Agent : — 

gf 21, LEADENHALL STREET, ) To„_-„ ^n 
S 1 54, LIME STREET . / ^^^^' ^•^• 

W. KSEV, XmpreMBieyele Works, Sorwood Junction, S.E. 
Price Lists, One Stamp. 



THE BICYCLE OF THE DAY FOR 1878 IS J. STASSEH'S " HOHPAREIL" 

The only machine fitted with Screwless Spokes, warranted not to break 
or loosen ; patent eccentric brake easily applied and wonderfully effective ; 
new patent double-coned adjustable steering gear ; best red rubber tyres, 
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to possess our Patent Circular-wheel Valise. These machines are made 
for work, and are the best and cheapest machines, as they require no 
repairs and never get out of order, and are strongly recommended by 
Members of the London Bicycle Club, and by all who have used them. 
Weight of machine, from 40 lb. or from 1 lb. per inch. 

C ity Agent: GOT, 21. Leadenhall Street 
PEAKES, Pnncei S treet, Leiceiter Square, London, W. 

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Factobt Entrance : BEAUMONT PLACE. ' 
Prospectus Id., with Photo. 3d. All sizes kept in stock ready for delivery. 

AGENCY FOR ALL BEST BICYCLES. 

The best Bicycle support in use, weight 3^ ounces, presented with each 
new Bicycle. Instruction free to purchasers ; if purchaser does not reside 
in or near London, arrangements made to lessen or obviate the expense of 
learning, Special Circular for the guidance of Bicyclists post free. 

T. A. SMILY, 17, DALSTON LANE, 
Nearly opposite Dalstoa Junction, London, E.G. 

A REAL BOON TO BIC YCLISTS. 

PHIVER'S EXQUISITE MANUS ALBA, 

FOR THE HANDS AND FEET, 

Sent hy Post for Is. &?. in Stamps, by the Wholesede AgeiU, 

J. MASOy, 120, Ooldhawk Boad, Shepherd*! Bnah, London, W. 

IMPORTANT TO ALL. 
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for Preventing Rust, 6d., Is., and Is. 9d 

HABBISOH'S POLISHINO POWDES 

instantly removes Rust and Corrosion from Metals, and for Polling 
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8HIETCIJFF k CO., 66, Qgidhawk Boad, ghephardi Bush, 



THE 



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(Three minutes' walk from Great Western and Praed Street 
Hailway Stations ) 

Proprietoks : 

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BICYCLES BOUGHT, SOLD, OR EXCHANGED. 

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CHARGES MODERATE. 

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Price Lists on Application. 

Within three minutes' walk oj Edgware Boad, Praed Street 

(Metropolitan), and Great Western Mailway Stations. 
London, 1878. 



Printed for the Proprietors by Darling & Son, at the Minerva Steam 
Printing Office, 35, Eastcheap, London, E.C.— July 4, 1878. 



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" J'engage done tous ct ^iter dam leurs ecriis toute personnalit^, toute allusion dSpassant les limites de la discusmn la 

plm sincere et la plus courtoise" — Laboulbene. 



Vol.!. No. ife] 



Edited by A. OGIEK WARD. [Thursdat, July 11, 1878. 



CONTENTS. 



PAGB 

The Highways Bill 106 

General Meet 106 

Bicycle Union 106 

Saturday Rnns 107 

White Hill, Henley 108 

Hampetead to Winchester, Christchurch, Bonmemouth, Bland- 
ford, Dorchester, and Weymouth 109 



With Flowing Sheet 109 

London Bicycle Club Meets Ill 

Racing Fixtures Ill 

Exchange list Ill 

Correspondence Ill 

Answer to Correspondent 112 



THE HIGHWAYS BILL. 

Thanks to Sir Henry Jackson, Q.G., member for Coventry, 
and Sir C. Dilke, bicyclists are not to be subjected to the ill- 
considered regulations proposed by Sir 6. Jenkinson, nor are 
they to be altogether at the mercy of local authorities. 

The Bill, indeed, gives power to the latter to regulate 
bicycles, but their regulations will have to conform to a 
model provided by the Local Government Board, in framing 
which the Bicycle Union will doubtless have a voice. 

Something, at least, will have been done in saving riders 
from the nuisance of incessant whistling in every crowded 
thoroughfare, and of having to carry a whole arsenal of im- 
plements of noise to suit the requirements of each local 
authority. Lamps and bells are, however, inevitable in 
face of the attitude of our Government. 

In this emergency, where time was everything, Mr. 
Nairn's early information and Mr. Salomon's ready counsel 
were of the greatest service to me, and deserve the best 
thanks of the Union, and all bicyclists. 

C. R. HUTCHINGS, 

Solicitor to the Bicycle Union. 



GENERAL MEET. 
As it is just possible that some members are realli; in 
doubt as to the meaning of the direction " by train," it 
may be as well to explain that it is only intended that the 
train should be used to bring members to the Meet at Lea 
Bridge Road. Once there, further progress will be per 
hicycle. C. R. Hutchinqs, Hon. Sec. 



BICYCLE UNION. 

The adjourned meeting of the Union was held at the 
Guildhall Tavern on the 5th instant, G. F. Cobb, Esq., 
C.U.B.C., in the chair. Our Club was represented by 
Messrs. Riicker, Hutchings, and Smith. The Hon. Sec 
stated that the Temple Club had forwarded a cheque for 
£8 4s., being their subscription for the current year. 

Wtih regard to the Inter-Amateur-Professional Races, 
it was stated by the Secretary that he had communicated 
with some of the best amateurs, asking if tliey would 
compete at sucli a meeting. Messrs. Wyndham and Weir 
had not replied, Mr. Crofton had given up racing, and 
Messrs. KeithrFalconer and East could not give a definite 
answer. Mr. McWilliam (T.B.C.) was the only one who 
accepted. 

A new club, the Notts Amateur B.C., has joined, with 
Mr. Nixon (P.B.C.) as representative. 

It was decided, that any club may apply to the Union 
for their sanction to hold a race meeting between amateurs 
and professionals, and that the Race Committee be autho- 
rised to receive and consider such applications, with power 
to refuse if they think fit. 

Mr. C. R. Hutchings was engaged as solicitor for the 
case "Laycock v. Johnson," at Northampton, the judge 
having agreed to allow a new trial. 

Mr. W. W. Rishworth was elected to fierve as Hon. Sec, 
Mr. Beningfield being, unfortunately, unable to carry it on 
owing to business engagements. In case Mr. Rishworth is 
unable to do so, Mr.W. T. Cork, Lombard B.C., will actjt?r(? tern. 



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LONDON BICYCLE CLUB GAZETTE. 



The Council of the Union approve of Mr. Jenkinson's 
motion in the House of Commons^ but suggest that a 
hnrd and fast rule for the whole kingdom would be preferable 
to bicyclists being left to the mercies of local boards. 

The election of the permanent Executive and the 
Race Committee was then proceeded with, Messrs. Riicker, 
Smith (L.B.C.), Sloughgrove (Pickwick), Goodman (Surrey), 
and Cork (Lombard), being elected as the Executive, and 
Messrs. Smith, Goodman, Riicker, Keith-Falconer, Airey, 
Beningfield, and Turner (Homsey) as the Race Committtee. 

The next meeting will be held on the second Thursday 
in Octobet. 



SATURDAY RUNS. 
N.E. District. 

The run on Saturday last to Navestock was well attended. 
Nine members and a visitor leaving Syborn's Corner, rode 
through Leyton and Snaresbrook to Woodford Bridge (where 
another member joined them), without further incident 
than the running over of a small pig by one of the leading 
" Stassens/' of which, by-the-bye, there were eight out of 
eleven machines. The roads from Woodford Bridge to 
Abridge, through Chigwell, were very bad, the surface 
having been destroyed by the heavy rain of the previous 
Sunday. Near Passingford Bridge some members of the 
Swift B.C. went by, being engaged in a 10-mile road race, 
and the opportunity for a spurt proving too much for some 
few men, the ranks were rather ignored for a mile or so. 
Navestock was reached about six o'clock, and after a turn 
at the village pump, nine men sat down to tea at the 
" Green Man," F. Jolly and E. H. Barrett having gone on 
to Ongar. After a somewhat frugal tea (without straw- 
berries ; F. Jolly being absent, the damsel in attendance 
was not pliable) the run home was commenced at seven, a 
good pace being kept np to Abridge, where the company 
divided, some men going a longer route in order to avoid 
the rough roads about Chigwell. Present : Messrs. Buckler, 
Devitt, Gibbs, Hindley, Nevill, G. Smith, W. J. Williams, 
J. W. Wilson, Jolly, and E. H. Barrett. 

Members are particularly requested to turn out in force 
on Saturday to welcome the other Districts on the occasion 
of their first visit to our county. 

Francis Godlee, District Captain. 



N.W. District. 
July Stk — Tlie run to Little Berkhampstead was emi- 
nently successful. It is a somewhat obscure village in 
south-east Herts, until lately un visited by the ravening 
bicyclist, who goeth about seeking what and where he may 
devour. Its manifold attractions, however, point to its be- 
coming a very popular resort. I am sorry I did not pre- 
viously explain the whereabouts of the place, a.s some 
members were profoundly ignorant of its bearings, and were 
apt to confound it with Great Berkhampstead, five-and- 



twenty miles off, at the other end of the county. It is 
possible that misconceptions of the kind may have deterred 
one or two from coming, but we shall repeat the run, by 
desire, later on. On reaching Potter's Bar, we turned off 
the main road by Cooper's Lane, Northaw Great Wood, 
Tolmers, Carbone Hill, Nfewgate Street, and Epping Green, 
arriving at our destination at about 6.30. The scenery in 
this neighbourhood is particularly enchanting, and the lanes 
ordinarily afford capital going, but the tremendous storm of 
Sunday week, which committed such havoc in the district, 
had cut up all the hills fearfully. Carbone Hill, a long and 
steep decline, and the corresponding ascent to Newgate 
Street, were dangerously loose. We found a snug little 
inn, and, ordering tea, went to examine the tower, which 
was, indeed, the primary object of our pilgrimage. It is a 
substantial brick erection some 100 feet high, built no 
doubt for an observatory, but long since disused, and now 
seems in danger of falling into decay. We groped our way 
cautiously up the narrow rickety staircase, and were well 
rewarded by a most extensive prospect. An excitable 
individual, unable to contain himself, threw his cap into 
the air, and it now adonis the top of a tree. We descended 
without observing the national custom of cutting our 
names, and, returning the keys to the rectory, were soon 
engaged in discussing' tea, during which Rogers came in. 
We left at 8.30 over the same roads as far as Tolmers, 
where we made a little diversion by Cuffley and Chase 
Lane. Four or five of the party, however, preferred to 
proceed independently, and thereby missed a beautiful 
little run. Distance 37 miles. Present : Alison, Bacon, 
Cook, Freeman, N. B. Morris, Powell, Rogers, Tegetmeier, 
Visick, and a visitor. 

J. W. Alison, District Captain. 



Western Division. 



The run to Windsor on Saturday proved a great success, 
although only fonr men joined in it, viz., the Captain, 
J. W. Langmore, W. F. J. Potts, and H. Jennings. We 
rode to Slough by the lanes via Cranford Bridge, Harling- 
ton, Drayton Green, Thorney Mill, Ritchings' Lodge and 
Langley Broom. Tlie surface on the latter part of this 
rout« was splendid, and for a wonder the Captain took 
Potts over a road which he had never ridden. We crossed 
the Bath road and went throngh Datchet, having a splendid 
view of the castle, and halted on the Albert Bridge for ten 
minutes. The route was then taken by the " Bells at 
Ouseley," where tea was procured, and, with the wind aft, 
a start was made by Runnymede to Egham and home by 
the direct Staines road ; this usually dusty track was for 
once in very fair order. Distance from Acton about 40 
miles. W. A. Smith, Dist Capt. 

The Captain leaves for three weeks' holiday on the 12th 
inst., but arrangements will be made for a deputy who will 
attend all the runs. 



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S.W. District. 
Two members only appeared to enjoy the well-planned 
run to Chobham, but they thoroughly enjoyed themselves, 
finding an interest, sometimes wanting in Club Meets, in the 
necessity for finding the way for themselves, and devious is 
a mild term to apply to the route after Weybridge. No 
stop was made for tea at Chobham, but a course shaped for 
Ripley, where, often being nearly lost in the sandy wastes 
of Woodham, they arrived in good case, and liad a jovial 
tea in pleasant company, after which they returned leisurely 
in company with C. W. Nairn. Distance from Surbiton 
36i miles. C. R. Hutcliings, St. J. A. Ryan. 



4 



S.E. District— -Croydon Division. 
Seven members left Central Croydon Station shortly 
after four for East Grinstead, and proceeded along the 
Brighton road, turning to the left at Caterham Junction 
(where one member turned back, finding the pace too fast). 
At Godstone some little difiiculty was experienced in 
getting through the crowds of people, there being a volun- 
teer fSte ; eventually East Grinstead was reached. Ward 
and Oswald arriving ten minutes later. The tea, as usual, 
at this place was first rate ; and, after a stroll in the 
garden, the home journey was started at 8.30 — all but two 
returning. Running down Persuasion HiJl, Young had a 
bad spill, which resulted in his taking train at Godstone. 
The rest arrived safely at Croydon at 10.40, having had a 
most enjoyable ride. Present : A. Bishop, E. H. Carr, 
T. Johns, Oswald, Potter, A. 0. Tyler, A. 0. Ward, 
Young, 

S.E.— Blackheath Divison. 

Three men started on Saturday last from the new ren- 
dezvous for Greenhithe, by way of Shooter's Hill, which on 
both sides was found in a most diabolical condition, and 
necessitating nearly a mile ot walking. At Bexley two 
more members joined the party ; the roads on to Green- 
hithe were then found in very good order. After tea had 
been ordered at the " White Hart " (the headquarters of 
the Junior Thames Yacht Club), a visit was made to the 
Government training ship, Chicliester, one of the vessels 
moored at Greenhithe. After tea the pier was sought, and 
members were much excited by the movements of H. N. 
Custance's new twin sailing surf-boat, which was a novelty 
in appearance and motions. 

At 8.0 p.m. this quiet little river-side village was left, 
and the ride home made through Dartford's Saturday-night 
crowded street, Bexley, and Eltham. Distance about 
30 miles. Present : Dicker, Kinder, Law, R. J. Scott, 
Turner. 

Members of the S.E. District (both Divisions) nm several 
nights of the week to Keston Ponds for a bathe, which is 
allowed after 8.0 p.m., so that almost any evening com- 
panions are to be met at this place, which is very accessible 



from Croydon and Blackheath, and one of the prettiest 
spots in the neighbourhood. It is proposed that Wednes- 
day evenings shall be a fixed Club run there. 

Cyril J. Turner, District Captain. 



Wednesday Run. — ^Western District. 

The evening being fine last Wednesday, five men atten- 
ded the Club run, leaving Rothschild s Gates, at the top of 
Gunnersbury Lane, at 7.25 p.m. We rode to Brentford, 
%nd Little Ealing, to see Mr. Newman on his way to 
Maidenhead ; thence, via Baston Lane, to Hanwell, where 
Toynbee and a friend were met. Just before reaching 
Hanwell, a gentleman (?), driving a fast-trotting horse, de- 
liberately drove us on to the footpath, and passed by, 
laughing at his success. The Captain, however, treated 
him in a manner he is not likely to forget for some time. 
We then went up the hill to Cuckoo and Perrivale, and 
turned off to Horsenden Wood and The Ballot Box. A 
good run down was much enjoyed. Horsenden Hill was 
rough, and proved a regular grind. Sudbury Hill was 
reached, and the homeward route taken, ma Alperton and 
Hanger Hill. At Sudbury Station, Mr. Bacon (N.W.) and 
his brother overtook us, and rode with us for the rest of 
the run. Thorn and the Captain went up Hanger Hill at 
a rattling pace, and waited for the rest at the top. The 
south side is now pretty free from stones, and the run 
down can be safely enjoyed. Distance about 19 miles. 
Present : W. A. Smith, W. J. Potts, F. Des Voeux, W. T. 
Thorn, R. Newman, P. Toynbee, A. J. Bacon, — Bacon, 
and another (visitors). 

N.B. — ^To prevent mistakes, please note that the Acton 
end of Gunnersbury Lane is at the corner of Rothschild's 
Park. The lane to Actoa is Folly Lane. 



WHITE HILL, HENLEY. 

Ou Thursday and Friday last F. Toynbee, of the Western 
District, rode from Acton to the Henley Regatta and back, 
and on the first day ran down White Hill on a brakeless 
bicycle, feet over handles. A more reckless rider than the 
gentleman in question probably does not exist, but it is 
certainly detrimental to our sport for anyone, whatever his 
nerve and proficiency in the use of the bicycle may be, to 
set such examples to other and less skilful riders. Had the 
bridge at Henley, and its approach, been crowded with 
carriages as it used to be a few years ago, Mr. Toynbee 
would in all probability have been damaged for life. 

W. A. Smith. 

Sir, — I wish to make a trip to Normandy for a fortnight 
about September, but am not tied to date or duration of 
holiday. Should be glad to communicate with any other 
member bent on a similar journey. — ^Yours faithfully, 

Alfred Henry, L.B.O. 

London: 32, Warwick Road, W. 



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HAMPSTEAD TO WINCHESTER, CHRISTCHURCH. 
BOURNEMOUTH, BLANDFORD, DORCHESTER, 
AND WEYMOUTH. 

I had arranged with Buckler to do a week's easy riding 
before the Bath race ; so, on Monday, June 3rd, we started 
from " Jack Straw's Castle " at 8.30 a.m., and pursued the 
well-known road to Kew against a gentle breeze, and then 
bumped over the macadam to Hounslow, taking the left- 
hand road for Staines, and thence to Egham, dismounting 
for the first time at the foot of the hill, altliough it is quite 
rideable. Mounting at the top, we traversed the splendid 
road, shown me by the Western Captain, to Bagshot, riding 
the *' Jolly Farmer's " hill with ease, and dismounting at 
the top to obtain some light refreshment, whilst the dis- 
cussion ran on the science of hill-riding. It is very astonish- 
ing what a changed aspect a hill wears under different 
circumstances, and I was never more surprised than when I 
found all the hills to Winchester quite easy to ride, as I 
had vivid recollections of several stiff bits to climb. I had 
been saying that we should have a steep hill up on to 
Hartford Bridge Flats '' as soon as we passed this little 
slope " — judge, then, our surprise when we found ourselves 
on the Flats without the hill. I should advise anyone who 
has not been here to pay a visit to this superb road. The 
Flats are about four miles long, and quite straight, and the 
view is very extensive and fine. 

We bowled along without exertion through Hartley Row, 
Odiham, and South Wamborough, to Alton, through which 
town the road goes right, left, right, and is not over easy to 
find, unless you know the way. 

At Chawton we took the left-hand road for East Tisted, 
although the one to the right, through New Alresford, is 
the more direct to -Winchester. At East Tisted we had 
tea, after which we caught up two hunters, and had a 
three-mile spin with them, keeping them well in the rear. 
Filmer Hill was flown, and at the bottom, the first turn- 
ing to the right (opposite the "Hut") was taken for 
Bramdean. The road here was like a racing path for 
about four miles, and two more brought us to the foot 
of the Downs, which had to be surmounted by a succession 
of hills, all of which we rode with consummate ease, only 
one being at all stiff. From the top of these wild, bare 
Downs, with their numerous sheep pens, a splendid view 
was obtained for many miles round ; and, as we stood 
silently scanning the horizon and the valleys beneath us, 
and listening to the bleatings from distant pens, we felt 
a soft charm stealing over us that made us linger, and 
bade ill for our reaching Winchester before dark. Giving 
a farewell bugle call, we mounted and rode cautiously 
down the long hill to the corner, :and, seeing that the 
loose stones had not yet gone, we dismounted and walked 
a couple of hundred yards, and then mounting we had 
a rather rough run down. One more hill down was flown, 
and then a nasty steep pitch which ought not to be 



ridden, brought us into the " Wliitechapel end" of the 
White City. Turning sharp to the right, we soon found 
ourselves in the main street (N.B. Bicr/disU pamng 
through Winchester are obliged to carry bells, or walk). 
Winchester being the head-quarters of the rifles, we met 
crowds of these dark-coated gentry. 

We put up at the " George," which is a large comfort- 
able hotel. Next morning, after inspecting the cathedral, 
we started with a long walk out of the town, past the 
barracks, where the rifles were going through the pleasures 
of a battalion drill. A good view is obtained of tlie town 
from this hill. A heavy, gusty wind was blowing dead in 
our teeth, and before we had gone a mile the clouds which 
had been gathering saluted us with a blinding shower for 
five minutes. We dashed down a hill and into a shed, but 
were hardly under cover before it left off. 

The road to Romsey is undulating and very pretty, but 
was a little muddy from the shower. 

Palmeb Dalton. 
(To be continued.) 



WITH FLOWING SHEET. 
Bath to Andover. 

Though there is nothing particular to cast loose about a 
bicycle as a sort of salute to a fair wind, still there is a 
general sense of doing as you like, and freedom from the 
anxieties of nice steering and tough work, which makes the 
above metaphor seem appropriate to a ride before such a 
gale as wafted over 25 racers to such good purpose on 
Whit Monday last. 

Duty first and pleasure afterwards, was my motto on 
that eventful morning, so, though by no means relishing the 
prospect of a trip in the train on a Bank Holiday morning, 
I brought my steed betimes to the Bath Station, and duly 
found myself in the 7.25 train, bound for Corsham. How- 
ever, virtue was not unrewarded ; the van, a fine narrow- 
gauge one, was clear from end to end, and out of the front 
windows I got a capital view of the line ahead, and dis- 
covered (what perhaps few are aware of) that you can see 
right through the Box Tunnel from end to end, the light 
at the far end appearing first like a mere star. 

On the pleasures of papering a rough, greasy road, and 
trying to race G. P. Coleman till half strangled by the bag, 
I need not dilate ; suffice it to say that, having seen the 
last man through Melksham, I thankfully handed over the 
bag to the tender mercies of the Parcels Delivery, and 
then, with a kindred soul, quietly jogged on to Devizes. 

Here, despite the earnest wish of the whole population 
that we would '' put it on and catch 'em up," we called a 
halt, to inspect the really wonderful engineering work by 
which the Eennet and Avon Canal is brought down a hill 
about three furlongs long, and quite as steep as most people 
care to ride up. This is accomplished by means of a flight 
of locks no less than 25 in number, ranged one below 



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LONDON BICYCLE CLUB GAZETTE. 



110 



another like a giant's staircase, almost as far as yon can 
see, and so well made are they that, though each lock 
drops about 10 feet, many of those we saw did not leak 
enough to fill a wineglass — ^truly a model to the Thames 
Conservancy. Thfey say, however, that only about three 
barges a day pass, so that it cannot possibly pay to keep 
the locks up. 

We left Devizes by the Upavon Road, which branches 
from the Marlboro' Road at the green just out of the town. 
After about a mile we came to a tolerably stiff hill about 
half a mile long, on which is a remarkable monument, 
raised, we were told, by grateful wayfarers to the memory 
of the man who first made the road passable. We thought 
sadly of Reigate and other hills of our acquaintance, and 
wondered if any philanthropist would ever give bicyclists a 
chance of showing their gratitude for similar favours. On 
the whole, however, we incline to believe that the spirit of 
the age is more in favour of co-operation than individual 
munificence, and we therefore suggest that a company 
might be formed called, say, "The Asphaltic Bicycle- 
Path and Cheap Communication Company, Limited," 
for the purpose of laying an asphalte track along all the 
chief roads (of course reserved for bicycles), and arranging 
for the removal of such little obstacles as closed turnpikes, 
loose stones, break-neck pitches, bulls and boys. A Utopian 
scheme, I fear, but very pleasant to think of. 

This hill took us over the watershed between the two 
Avons (of Bath and Salisbury), and we were soon in the 
pretty Vale of Pewsey, running over a nearly level road for 
some 8 miles, with the Marlboro' Downs rising grandly on 
our left in a long line of heights ended by the fine bluff 
called Mart Hill, while close on our right the view was 
bounded by the glacis-like slope of the north face of 
Salisbury Plain. 

At about 11 miles from Devizes the Avon suddenly turns 
south, and cuts a gap in the glacis, like Dorking Gap on a 
small scale, and Upavon lies right in its jaws, a mere village 
marking the crossing point of the Devizes, Andover, and 
Pewsey-Salisbury roads. 

We cross the river, follow it south about three quarters 
of a mile, and then, turning very sharp to the left, com- 
mence a stiff incline to the summit of the table-land, 
nearly a mile long. 

Here the rain (which I omitted to say had been coming 
down in sheets off and on all the way from Devizes) stopped 
for good, the sun came out, the road changed from mac- 
adam to chalk fiint, and we were fairly blown on to the 
top. And what a change ! Instead of the rich foliage and 
close hedges of the stone country we had left, everywhere 
bare downs stretching in one smooth expanse as far as the 
eye could reach, till the tip of Salisbury spire could just 
be made out looming up on the horizon 20 miles away. 
And now we felt the full force of the wind. Over the 
ahnost dry roads we seemed to fly without an effort, and 



after dipping in and out of the deep gully in which West 
Everleigh lies hidden — ^hardly noticeable on the smooth 
down till you are on it — ^we found ourselves bringing up 
the tail of a village procession which landed us with 
unexpected pomp at our halting-place, "The Crowns," 
East Everleigh. 

A famous place this, once, 50 coaches passing a day — a 
sort of Mugby Junction among posting houses — and even 
now a fine roomy place, with a lovely garden, fine views, 
and — most moderate charges. The procession turned out 
to be a bean-feast on foot, and we trembled lest there 
should be not even beans for us, but, wonderful to say, so 
fjEkr from starving, we got the cream of the feast, and paid 
two shillings, all told, beer and all. 

From this pleasant oaais in the grassy plain to Andover 
was simply a magnificent ride, road now quite dry, and a 
perfect gale behind, with not a scrap of shelter. The fate 
of the bicyclist who should attempt the reverse route in 
such a breeze made one shudder to think of. At first the 
road undulates, and the scenery is very wild ; then the 
hills sink, and there is more cultivation, with now and 
then a few hedges about Ludgero Hall, the country resi- 
dence, we understand, of King Lud, whenever that oppressed 
monarch can escape from the vaults of the Chatham and 
Dover Railway. Then away again over more splendid road 
for Weyhill, a sort of enchanted village of which the houses 
are all locked and empty, only to be peopled once a year, 
when the graziers bring their flocks from far and near to 
the great fair, and the "deserted village" becomes a 
mighty town for a few days. 

Three miles run down, and we are at Andover, where so 
hospitable a welcome awaited us that further riding was 
out of the question. Distances are as follows : — 

Mfles. 

Bath to Melksham (by Corsham) 15 

Melksham to Devizes 7 

Devizes to Upavon 14 

Upavon to East Everleigh 4 

East Everleigh to Andover 12 

52 

From Bath to Upavon is all macadam, rough, greasy, 
and bad to Melksham, but after that very fair. The rest 
of the road is chalk flint, very little used, but as we saw it, 
after rain, very good. 

There are no unrideable hills, except perhaps the pitches 
east of West Everleigh. 

The big road from Marlboro' to Salisbury, crossing at 
East Everleigh, only exists as a grass track, and that from 
Salisbury to Hungerford is little better. 

Facilis Descensus, L.B.C. 

Double Acrostic. — Correct answers have been received 
from F. des Voeux, Norman Carr, Le Dykere, E. F. C, 
OBdipus, and Prussia. 



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LONDON BICYCLE CLUB GAZETTE. 



LONDON BICYCLE CLUB MEETS. 

July 13.— General Meet. 

N.E, District. — Top of Lea Bridge Road (near Dalston 

and Hackney Downs Stations), at 4.30 p.m., for 

Chigwell, by Epping Forest, 
N.W. District.— *' Jsuik Straw's Castle," at 3.30 p.m. 

Meet other District at Syborn's Corner. 
W. District.— To^ of Lea Bridge Road, (by train), 4.30 

p.m., for Chigwell. 
S.W. District. — Top of Lea Bridge Road, (by train), 

4.30 p.m., for Chigwell. 
S.E. District (Croydon Division). — Top of Lea Bridge 

Road, (by train), 4.30 p.m., for Chigwell. 
S.E. District (Blackheath Division). — Top of Lea Bridge 

Road, (by train), 4.30 p.m., for Chigwell. 
July 20. 
N.E. District. — ^Lea Bridge Road, 3. 30 p.m. for Upminster. 
N.W. District— " Jaxik Straw's Castle," at 4.0 p.m., for 

Rickmansworth. 
W. District. — Kew Green, at 4.0 p.m., for Bumham 

Beeches. Meet S.W. District at Harlington Corner 

at 4.45. 
S.W. District.— "The Clarence," Teddington, at 4.0 p.m., 

for Bumham Beeches. Meet W. District at Har- 
lington Corner, at 4.45. 
S.E. District (Croydon Division). — Central Croydon Station, 

at 40. p.m., for Westerham via Sandersted. 
S.E. District (Blackheath Division). — Foot of College Park 

Hill, Lewisham, for Westerham via Bromley. 

July 27. 

N.E. District. — ^Lea Bridge Road, at 3.30 p.m., for Ongar. 

N. W. District.—" Jack Straw's Castle," at 4.0 p.m., for 

Hatfield via Mims. 
W. District. — Kew Green, at 4.0 p.m., for Horseley Towers 

via Leatherhead, return by Ockliam. 
S.W. District. — Surbiton Station, at 4.0 p.m., for Dorking. 

Meet S.E. District. 
S.E. District (Croydon Division). — Central Croydon Station, 

at 3.45 p.m., for Dorking. Meet S.W. District. 
S.E. District (Blackheath Division). — Foot of College Park 

HiU, Lewisham, for Sevenoaks. 
August 3. 
N.E. District.— Top of Lea Bridge Road, 3.30 p.m., for 

Harlow. 
N.W. District.— " J&ck Straw's Castle," 4 p.m., for 

Watford. 
W. District. — Kew Green, 4 p.m., for Amersham via 

Ruislip. 
8. W. District. — Surbiton Station, 3.30 p.m., for Dorking. 
S.E. District (Croydon Division). — Central Croydon Station, 

4.30 p.m. for Reigate. Meet B. Division. 
S.E. District (Blackheath Division).— Foot of College Park 

Hill, Lewisham, at 3.30 p.m., for Reigate. Meet 

C. Division. 



. Arrangements have been made for the supply of t^a on 
the 13th at the " Thatched House," Epping, as mentioned 
in last week's issue. 

Francis Godlee. 
Walthamstow, 8th July, 1878. 

RACING FIXTURES. 

July 13th. — ^Pickwick Bicycle Club, Alexandra Palace, 
2 miles Handicap. Entries (2s 6d) close 
July 6th, to L. C. B. Yeoman, 21, Gutter Lane, 
E.C. A fortnight's practice ticket issued to 
each competitor. 

July 20th.— Temple Bicycle Club, L.A.C. Grounds, Stam- 
ford Bridge. 1 Mile Handicap. Entries 
(2s. 6d) close July 8th, to H. Etherington, 
East Temple Chambers, Whitefriars Street, 
Fleet Street. Handicapper, John Keen. 

July 27th.— Joint Stock Banks' Athletic Club, L.A.C, 
Grounds, Stamford Bridge. 4 miles Bicycle 
Handicap. Entries (2s. 6d.) close July 20th, 
to W. Basan, Hon. Sec, 28, Highbury New 
Park, N. 

July 27th. — ^Brighton Bicycle Club Race Meeting. 

Aug. 10th. — Stanley Bicycle Club Race Meeting at Alex- 
andra Palace. 

Aug. 17th. — ^Tower Hamlets Bicycle Club Race Meeting 
at Alexandra Palace. 



EXCHANGE LIST. 
(Two Insertions, not exceeding three lines, for Is.) 

58-in. Stassen, front-wheel brake, new last season, price 
£12.— J. F. Marchant, 59, Berners-street, W. 

For Sale, 52-iuch " Special Challenge," new last year, 
and still in good condition. Carter brake. Price £12. 
H. R. Boyce, 35, Warrington Crescent, W. 

For Sale, cheap, 56-inch racing "Humber." Address 
Gilbert F. Beck, Chislehurst, Kent. 

For Sale. — 54-inch Stassen, eccentric brake, leg rests, 
bag, oilcan, and spanner. In perfect order. Price, £l2. — 
P. D , 29, South Hill Park, Hamjistead. 

For Sale. — 54j-inch Keen's Eclipse Racer. Very little 
used, and in perfect condition. Price, £lO. — C. A. E. 
Pollock, Trinity College, Cambridge. 

The Head Quarters of the L.B.C. are at 44, Pall Mall. 

* « • 4" « 

That sounds very imposing, but I should, like to know 

why we cannot combine the useful with the ornamental. 
* * « • * 

Most of our members '' appartiennent au haut commerce 
de Londres," as the Frenchman puts it in his account of 
the eight tourists. The '' haut commerce " Ims its centre 
in that x)art of London known as " the City." 



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LONDON BICYCLE CLUB GAZETTE. 



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Don't you Ree what I'm driving at? I want to see 

L.B.C. exalted to something above a wheelgrinding- 

Satnrday-afternoon-tea-society, and, having noticed a 

marked inclination on the part of members to find their 

way to any City refreshment house wliere they are likely 

to meet one another, this scheme suggested itself to me. 
« • « • * 

Suppose there was a nice large room, in a first-rate 
city tavern, which could be rented for committee meetings, 
dinners, and club use in general. " Funds !'' I hear 
somebody exclaim. Why, the fortunate landlord who gets 
such customers as our men (judging by performances at 
club teas,) ought to let us have the use of a room for 
a mere — ^bugle call. The advantages which present them- 
selves to my mind are so numerous that I fear the Gazettb 
cannot afibrd sufficient space to state them all. We should 
have newspapers and maps to consult, in fact, gradually 
quite a library. Members would meet to arrange trips ; 
candidates for election would be introduced ; we should 
lunch or dine there, and insist on prompt attendance, 
moderate charges, and cleanliness — advantages I have 
searched for in vain in public dining rooms. 

[All this sounds very enticing, but we should be glad 
if our correspondent would supply a few facts as to the 
disposition of City tavern-keepers in the matter. If he is 
correct, the Committee would be only too pleased to take 

advantage of his discovery. — ^Ed.] 

• * « • « 

On Saturday last there was a bicycle race in the City ! 
The event formed part of the Honorable Artillery Com- 
pany's programme at their Athletic Sports Meeting, held 

annually at the head-quarters of the regiment. 

* • tt « « 

I called it a race ; a walk over for W. T. Thorn (H.A.C. 
Battery and L.B.C.) would be perhaps more correct, for 
although his principal opponent, H. Young (H.A.C. Bat- 
talion and Bovers B.C.) stuck to it pluckily, he could never 
get on terms with Thorn. The whole thing must only be 
regarded as an experiment, the course being grass and so 
extremely lumpy that there was some doubt as to whether 

a bicycle race would be practicable. 

♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ # 

I heard some talk amongst the members of the Honor- 
able Artillery Company of having a regular cinder path 
constructed round their ground (about four laps to the 
mile), and if this were done it would form a most valuable 
training ground, being situated almost in the heart of the 
City. 

Cactus. 



7o the Editor of th$ London Bicycle Club Gazette. _ 

Dear Mr. Editor, — In a recent number of your Gazbttb 

a correspondent signing himself " S " says that bicycles 

have no legal right upon the highway. If this be true, I 

should like to ask you whether they have any legal right 



to monopolise the tennis-lawn at home, and to interfere 
with the tennis rights of younger sisters ? If I were to 
tell you several peculiar, not to say unpleasant experiences 
which I have undergone through bicycles, you would see 
that my question is not unreasonable. Upon one occasion, 
for instance, two youths dismembered their bicycles upon 
our lawn, which was strewn with nuts, spanners, oil-cans, 
screws, cotton-waste, and back-bones. When I had made 
about nine journeys to the workshop at the top of the 
liouse for things needful to clean the machines, I helped 
them to wash and rub, until my hands and pinafore were 
black and oily as a stoker, all my knuckles grazed with 
burnishing bright spokas. It was getting dusk, and we had 
some trouble in collecting the pieces to put the bicycles 
together again. The difficulty of this last undertaking 
was proved by the shouts, " You're putting my treadle on 
your machine," " Where on earth is my spanner ?" " These 
must be your screws, they don't fit anjrwhere," etc., etc. 
The machines were liopelessly mixed up together, and the 
end of the exciting scene was that a cab had to be fetched, 
the bicycle fragments ignominiously tumbled into it, and 
driven to the nearest ironmonger. I need not say that we 
played no lawn tennis that evening. As I have five more 
brothers, all doomed in their turn to go through the 
bicycling fever, my grievance is not entirely imaginary. 
I hear that the Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to 
Animals talks of interfering, if so many injured pinafores 
and knuckles might be saved. 

Pray forgive my taking up so much room in your 
Gazette, as I know you have none to spare. — I am, dear 
Mr. Editor, yours faithfully, 

A Member's Youkqest Sister. 



To the Editor of the London Bicycle Club Gazette. 

Sir — The bicycle of a somewhat clumsy L.B.C. man 
came rather to grief the other evening in the pretty village 
of Carshalton. A working engineer, whose wife keeps the 
tobacconist's shop near the Church, took pity on his forlorn 
condition, and bestowed much patient and intelligent pains 
on the iron steed. He gave the clumsy one some good 
advice and a sturdy little spanner (much needed) of his 
own manufacture. He would hear of no immediate form 
of gratitude, but expressed a modest hope that when the 
grey coats and brown stockings pass his way, they will call 
and see for themselves whether Mrs. Haines' excellent 
Mitcham returns and Manilla cheroots are not sufficient 
inducements to a visitor. I said I would tell the brethren. 
— ^Yours truly, 

A Grateful One. 



TO CORRESPONDENT. 
A. S. IsTER. — Next week. 



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TRICYCLES for Ladies or Gentlemen. 
YOUTHS' BICYCLE S. 

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Offered FREE to Officers of all Clubs to arrange Matches, 
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C HAMPION omfAMgWTAL BIDKB, 

THE EMPRESS 

Is acknowledged as the best Roadster. Strong, durable, and easy run- 
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of London Bicycle and other Clubs. 

Bole Agent: T. A. SMILT, DALSTOIT JinrCTIOir, E. 
THE NORWOOD. 

A newly-designed light Roadster. A very elegant machine. Will 
stand plenty of work. Weight of 52-inch, 40 lb. City Agent :— 






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W. KEEH, BmpreM Bicycle Works, Norwood Junction, S.E« 
Price Lists, One Stamp. 



THE BICYCLE OF THE DAY FOR 1878 IS J. STASSEN-S " NOHPAREIL" 

The only machine fitted with Screwlees Spokes, wammted not to break 
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Weight of machine, from iU lb. or from 1 lb. per inch. 

C ity Agent: GOT, 21. Leadenludl Street 
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Nearly opposite Dalston Junction, London, E.C. 

A REAL BO ON TO BICYCLISTS. 

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for Preventing Rust, 6d., Is., and Is. 9d. 

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instantly removes Rust and Corrosion from Metals, and for Polishing 
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Printed for the Proprietors by Bablino & Sov, at the Minerva Steam 
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'^T engage done tons ct eviter dans leurs ecrits taute personnalit^, totite allusion d^passant les limites de la discussion la 

plus sincere et la plus courtoise" — ^Laboulbknb. 



Vol. L No. 17.] 



Edited by A. OGIER WARD. [Thursday, July 18, 1878. 



CONTENTS. 



PACK 

Notice 118 

The Northampton Case 113 

The Highways Bill 113 

Licensed to Kill 114 

Wargrave-on-Thames, Marlow, Beaconsfield, Amenham, Watford, 

Hatfield, Hertford, Roydon, and Ongar 116 

Hampstead to Winchester, Christchurch, Bournemouth, Bland- 
ford, Dorchester, and Weymouth (continued from our last) 116 



PAOB 

General Meet 117 

N.W. District 117 

London Bicycle Club Meets 118 

Racing Fixtures 118 

Exchange List US 

Southern Meet 118 

Correspondence 110 

Notice to Correspondents 110 



NOTICE. 

The Editor will be much obliged if all communications — 
official or otherwise — intended for insertion in the Gazette 
are forwarded to him on Tuesday morning at the latest. 
One of the principal objects of this paper is defeated if the 
publication takes place later tlian Thursday morning, and, 
in the interests of the members themselves, the Editor will, 
in future, be compelled to adhere to the above rule. Any 
delay in the receipt of the Gazette should be reported at 
once to the Publisher, 35, Eastcheap, E.G. 



We have received several communications on the subject 
of training, both for racing purposes and long-distance 
riding. We invite such of our racing members as can spare 
us a few minutes from their abundant leisure to send us (no 
matter how roughly) their own practical experience in the 
matter. We will not of necessity publisli their reports in 
the exact form they are transmitted to us, but it is as cer- 
tain that they have much to teach as that most of us have 
a great deal to learn on this somewhat neglected but im- 
portant subject. 



THE NORTHAMFfON CASE. 

On the adjourned application, at the County Court, 
Northampton, for a new trial, on the 17th inst., Mr. C. 
Becke, of Northampton, appeared for the plaintiff, and the 
case was watched by Mr. Hutchings, of Doctors' Commons, 
on behalf of the Bicycle Union. 



His Honour, who seemed to fully feel the importance of 
the legal point, " Are bicycles carriages within the meaning 
of the Highway and Turnpike Acts or not ? " at first ap- 
peared to think that he was only hearing an adjournment 
of the original action, granted in order that the plaintifTs 
solicitor might have time to get up the authorities, and 
consequently required from Mr. C. Becke a statement of 
his view of the law, which that gentleman most ably gave, 
referring to a large number of authorities, and, among 
others, to the 78th section of the Highway Act, 5 & 6 
Wm. IV., cap. 50. After a lengthy argument, his Honour, 
however, said that his view of the law was unchanged, 
but that he had no objection to grant a case for the 
Superior Courts ; but this the Registrar reminded him 
could not bo done, as the verdict was already entered. 
Mr. Becke then returned to his application for a new trial, 
on the ground that the facts had not been fully considered ; 
this was opposed by the other side, and the Judge refused 
the application, saying he was perfectly clear on the facts, 
and that much the best plan would be to tako the next 
case to the Magistrates. All possibility, thercfoie, of an 
appeal in this case is now over. 



THE HIGHWAYS BILL. 

Few, perhaps, of our readers are aware how great was 
the danger with which our sport was menaced by the 
legislation of the past week, and how much we owe to 
those whose watchfulness and zeal have warded it oflF. 

Tho course of events, we believe, was as follows : On 



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Thursday, the 27th June, Sir G. Jenkinson asked Mr. 
Sclater-Booth, the President of the Local Government 
Board and Minister in charge of the Bill, " whether his 
attention had been called to the accident to Canon Harvey, 
from being knocked down by a bicycle, and whether he 
proposed to insert in the Bill any clause protecting the 
public from the reckless use of bicycles ;" to which the 
President replied, " that he had no such intention, but saw 
no objection to the amendment in that direction proposed 
by the hon. member." 

This amendment originally stood as follows, to insert 
after a clause, giving power to local authorities to make 
bye-laws : " (6) For prohibiting the use of any bicycle 
(sic) on any highway unless the rider of such bicycle shall 
be provided with, and shall use, a loud whistle OR other 
effectual means of giving audible notice of his approach on 
meeting or passing any vehicle or person on horseback." 

The attention of the Union solicitor (Mr. Hutchings) 
was called to this amendment by Mr. Theo. Godlee, and 
the former at once wrote to Sir George, with a copy of the 
Union road rules, intimating that the Union had no objec- 
tion to the clause, and would only ask that care should be 
taken to make the regiilations uniform throughout the 
country. Sir George replied that the wishes of the Union 
should have his consideration, but gave no intimation that 
he intended to alter the clause. It was, therefore, with a 
good deal of surprise that Mr. Hutchings was informed a 
day or two afterwards by Mr. Nairn that the amendment 
stood altered in the following form : " For prohibiting the 
use of any bicycle on any highway unless the rider of such 
bicycle shall be provided with, and shall use^ a loud bell 
AND whistle, as well as a clear light after dark, or other 
effectual means of giving audible notice of his approach on 
meeting or passing any vehicle or any person on horseback." 

This alteration, it was evident, necessitated immediate 
action. The President had said he saw no objection to 
the clause ; and it would doubtless pass unless some oppo- 
sition were made. 

Mr. Nairn had, with great promptitude, written to 
Sir C. Dilke on his own responsibility; but to ensure 
attention from the Government it was most necessary that 
the Union, as the official representative of the riding 
interest, should take action, — and action they certainly 
did take, if spending the best part of a week in inter- 
viewing and writing to M.P/s, drawing amendments and 
memorials, and successfuUy organising opposition to the 
clause can be said to come under that denomination. 

Of course there were many disappointments. Members 
were out of town, or engaged, or inaccessible in one way 
or another. However, at last Mr. Hutchings managed to 
get a clear statement of our needs before Sir H. Jackson, 
Q.C., member for Coventry, and found himself most 
energetically backed by Mr. Salomon, chairman of the 
Coventry Machinists Company, in so doing. 



Sir Henry promised to take the case up, and point out 
to the President the absurdity of enfordug perpetual 
whistling through every town on individuiJs, or bell- 
ringing on a whole meet of twenty or thirty, and generally 
of making haphazard regulations about bicycling without 
any reference to those who were conversant with the sub- 
ject. He accordingly laid the matter before the President, 
who agreed to make the clause general, simply giving the 
local authorities power to regulate bicycles. At the same 
time he assured Sir Henry that every care would be taken 
by the Local Government Board to make the regulations 
uniform, and that they would prepare a model set of 
bye-laws to which those of the local authorities would have 
to cotifolin« 

Sir Heni7 was> through a mistake, absent from his place 
when the clause came on, but Sir C. Dilke spoke much to 
the above effect^ aud the clause was passed as Mr. Sclater- 
Booth had prottlsed. 

Another amendment had been proposed for prohibiting 
" fiirious riding, racing, ftnd riding on the footpath." This 
Mr. Sclater-Booth met by saying that such offences were 
already provided against, a remark which, as reported in 
some papers, might be taken to mean that bicycles were 
amenable to the ordinary law of vehicles, and therefore, of 
course, entitled to their rights, including rule of the road. 

Whether the words really bore this meaning is, however, 
doubtful, and it is highly desirable that bicycles should be 
distinctly dechured to be vehicles within the meaning of the 
Highways Acts, and that the Union should thus be saved 
the uncertainty of expense of an appeal. 

This point, as well as the framing of the model bye- laws 
is now engaging the attention of the Union, and we have 
every confidence that in such capable and zealous lu^ds 
no real bicycling interest can suffer. The London Bicycle 
Club is deeply indebted to its Secretary, and the Union to 
its Solicitor, while all who ride, whether clubmen or un* 
attached, have reason to congratulate themselves that the 
latter office has been so ably filled by Mr. Hutchings. 



LICENSED TO KILL. 

In the course of our solitary rambles in the pleasant 
lanes of Surrey, finding our five-year-old Stassen prompt us 
to not unwilling meditation, we gave ourselves up to the 
study of the mode of life which would be most preferable, 
nor did we find any which for health or gently varied scene 
of action could compare with that of the calmly apathetic 
if somewhat drowsy being known as the Complete Carrier. 
The one thing wanting to his existence was an occasional 
brisk excitement, and this has now been supplied to him by 
recent decisions with no sparing hand. For if, as one of 
our great dreamers or writers has it. Murder be really one 
of the Fine Arts, the aesthetic career open to the wagoner 
of the future is almost unbounded, from the coarse or 



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115 



savage crunching of the "ponderous Stassen" to the 
breaking of the delicate Carver on the wheel, while the 
victims may be chosen from a noble army of martyrs which 
includes in its ranks the Bath Medallist equally with him 
who but lately has bestridden a boneshaker. Whether on 
right side or wrong, they may be driven over and crushed, 
with the one slight consolation that they are adding the 
much-needed zest to otherwise monotonous lives, and that 
" Died of contributory negligence" may be graven (in the 
bitter irony of truth) over their bones or their bicycles. 
But even as to condemned men privileges are allowed not 
granted to other criminals, so perhaps the powers that be 
may grant us the one melancholy grace of* being buried 
where we fall As in the Alpine mountain paths a cross 
points out to the shuddering passer-by the place where, 
months or years ago, some luckless traveller fell, so may we 
trust to see by our roadsides at no distant date pathetic 
memorials of coming tragedies. It would be a sad lesson, 
but not uninstructive, could we turn over the leaves of 
that sealed book which hides in its pages the things that 
will be. Imagination mournfully traces the following 
lines from the Bicyclist's Obituary of the coming year 

Xvo ' • • • 

"... thus reducing the number of this once pros- 
perous Club, not counting the men in hospital, to seven. 
The year 188 — has been indeed more fatal than any since 
the passing of the Bicycle Nuisance Act in 1878. • . . 
Hard by the ninth milestone on the Hounslow road, 
troubled by cramps no longer, sleeps the £Eunous winner of 
the above-named year. Far from the madding crowd of 
members and clients, covered by a stone worked in quaint 
and many devices, reposes, on Salisbury Plain, one who 
earned a triple chum to respect as Secretary, Solicitor, and 
Sailor; an Editor and his Sub-Deputy Scrub share the 
same bed at the foot of Beigate Hill, while under the 
shadow of the rocks at East Grinstead rests, not unmoumed 
or unvisited, what once was Kinder, Nairn, and Armor 
Boyle." Absit amen. 



WARGBAVE-ON-THAMES, MARLOW, BEACONS- 
FIELD, AMEESHAM, WATPORJ), HATFIELD, 
HERTFORD, ROYDON AND ONGAR. 
This is ft very jolly cross-country ride, and well worth 
trying. I started at 3.40 a.m., and rode to Twyford to get 
the first two miles with a friend ; here we parted, he to 
Bath and I to Ongar. Follow the wires towards London 
till close to Maidenhead Thicket, where there is a turn- 
ing to the left with a sign-post, which says "Marlow" 
— ^an excellent road along the side of a hill, so the scenery 
is delightful. Between one and two miles from Marlow 
the Maidenhead road comes in, on a hiU. Be careful 
going down it, as there is the proverbial ''pike" at the 
bottom ; and as it was not then 5 a.m., the gate was of 
coarse diut. However, in answer to my roar, the old man 



appeared in one boot, and said " he didn't mind hopping 
for a penny," which penny I gave him, and went on. 
Keep straight on through Marlow, and take the right- 
hand roadjjust outside, this will bring you to Woburn, 
after which comes a long and very rough hill, which must 
be walked up, and the road eventuaUy comes out on the 
Oxford road, some mile and a half the Wycombe side of 
Beaconsfield. By this time I began to feel hungry, as all I 
had had was a dry biscuit or two at starting, and luckily I 
found the " Cross Keys " open, where I got some eggs and 
bacon and tea. It is all very well for people to say they 
do not care about hearing what men eat and drink, but I 
maintain it is worth while knowing where a breakfast may 
be had at 5.25 a.m. I started for Amersham at 6.15, 
thinking I had wilily avoided the hills that lie between 
Marlow, High Wycombe, and Amersham, but I soon found 
I had been too clever. Let me conjure anyone who thinks 
of taking this road — ^by all he holds most near and dear, by 
his hind-wheel, dust-caps, treadle-pins, and tyres — to avoid 
it as he would a broken boneshaker. For the first half 
mile or so it was pretty good, slightly down hill, then 
came a series of precipices too steep to be ridden up 
or down, with a surface like the bed of a stream, com- 
bined with a lot of loose rocks that seemed to have 
no business there. This road can be avoided by going 
a mile or two further along the high road, and then taking 
a turn to the left, which directs to Amersham, Wendover, 
and Buckingham, if I remember right. It makes it some 
three miles further, but the improvement is quite worth 
the extra distance. At Amersliam I discovered that the 
wind was dead astern, and, consequently, to Rickmansworth 
the order of the day was pace and perspiration. Perhaps 
it's as well to walk down the little hill into this place, 
though it is nothing very bad, but the surface is loose, and 
there is a turn half way down. Be sure and ask for St. 
Albans here, and not Watford. The turnpike road goes 
straight on, and is easy enough to find, but when I was 
last there, feeling I should like to be quite sure, I asked for 
Watford, and was directed along a lane that eventually 
brought me into the place itself, instead of to the road that 
runs by the top of the town, to St. Albans. At the latter 
place I stayed a quarter of an hour (from 9.30 to 9.45, 1 
think), and then went on to Hatfield. Wind still behind, 
and getting strong, so the pace was good. Just as the 
signals of Hatfield Station heave in sight the road forks — 
that to the right appearing to be the one, but it only leads 
down to the rails, and you have to go back and take the other, 
which looks hardly more than a cart-track, to cross the bridge. 
Once over the bridge, turn sharp to the right down the 
hill, and the first turn to the left leads to Hertford. Just 
as I got here I realised what the storm of the 30th of June, 
that I had heard of, must have been like. The road lay low 
for two or three hundred yards, and was from three to four 
inches deep in large round stones that had been washed 



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LONDON BICYCLE CLUB GAZETTE. 



down by the rain and freed from their own proper sand. 
I could not have kept my seat, but for the hurricane as it 
almost was, beliiud me, urging me on in my mad career. 
Why is it that the seven miles from Hatfield to Hertford 
always seem nearer fourteen or twenty-one ? The road is 
usually good, but whichever way one rides it seemis as if 
the next town would never come. After Hertford is passed 
it saves a mile or so to take a narrow lane to the right, up 
a hill that must be walked. You cross the high road to 
Ware a little further on, and have a jolly run along a 
pretty lane to St. Margaret's. Turn sharp to the right in 
the village without crossing the river, up another hill, to 
Boydon. The gates across the railway, both at St. Mar- 
garet's and Roydon, are generally shut, however this 
time they were both open. At the top of Roydon 
the left-hand turning leads to Harlow Bush ; the road is 
easy to find, as all the turnings out of it have signposts. 
From here, I think, the shortest way to Ongar is to take 
the road along the top of the Common, and then the first 
to the right. For about a mile and a half all is plain sailing, 
till you come to a T-shaped formation of turnings ; take 
the one to the left, and from there signposts extend all the 
way to Ongar. I think the whole distance is 72 or 74 miles. 
I did it in eight hours twenty-four minutes through the 
help of the " draught," but the absence of wind in my 
face on a warm day made me yearn for a good rattling 
" nose-ender," to keep me cool. Roads, on the whole, 
excellent, with the exception of the five miles between 
Beaconsfield and Amersham and some of the Hertford and 
Hatfield road. I think the distances are as follows, but I 
won't vouch for their correctness. Wargrave to Marlow, 
through Twyford and Hare Hatch, 10 miles (There is a 
shorter way to Hare Hatch from Wargrave, saving a couple 
of miles, inquire for Maidenhead at starting and you will 
find it easily), Marlow to. Beaconsfield 6, Amersham 5, 
Rickmansworth 8, St. Alban's 11 (leaving Watford a little 
to the right), Hatfield 5, Hertford 7, Roydon 6, Harlow 
Bush 7, Chipping Ongar, through Magdalen Laver and 
Moreton 7 — total 72. 

MUCKEE. 



HAMPSTEAD TO WINCHESTER, CHRISTCHURCH, 
BOURNEMOUTH, BLANDFORD, DORCHESTER, 
AND WEYMOUTH. 

(Continued from our last) 

We were fortunate in finding the roads in the New Forest 
firm, and but for the wind we could have flown along ; 
as it was, the hills were made very stiff by it. The 
foliage of the forest was at its best, and as the day 
was not too hot we enjoyed ourselves immensely. We 
did not stop at Lyndhurst, but passing through were 
quickly in the wilds again ; the little bridge over the 
Blackwater stream being the next halting pkce. Paddling 



was indulged in, as I was sufTering from a sprained ancle, 
though I could not prevail upon Buckler to wet his feet ; 
but he seemed to enjoy watching me quite as much, and, 
like Ah Sin, he " smiled as he sat near the water with a 
smile that was childlike and bland," which was increased 
whenever I trod on a sharp stone. We now remembered 
that it was seven hours since we had breakfasted, so we 
determined to tea without delay, and we managed to get 
sufficient at a cottage near Holmesley Station, four miles 
further on. On nearing Christchurch, we met one of 
the C.B.C., who gave us good information about the roads. 
In the town a dog flew at him, and was very neatly kicked 
head over heels. The road to Bournemoudi is a fine level 
spin, only one little hill all the way. Bournemouth rather 
puzzled us, but we found our way to the pier, and after a 
short stay looked about for somewhere to put up at. 
The "Exeter" was chosen, and is comfortable, but not 
very moderate. In the morning, we were surprised to find 
no bathing going on before breakfast, but that did not 
prevent us from enjoying a swim in the "briny." We 
breakfasted with an old friend of mine, who showed us his 
bicycle and tricycle. When we departed we took the road 
for Wimborne Minster, through Cranford. At Wimborne 
we paid an unexpected visit to the father of one of our 
members, who received us very kindly. The road to Bland- 
ford is level, and first-rate going, and we went along at a 
fine pace. 

On nearing Blandford we were much amused by an old 
farmer, on a very placid-looking pony, which hadn't a shy 
in him, gratuitously informing us that " he wished those 

things were at the ^," well never mind where, but we 

wished him a safe journey there, and said good-bye, as he 
declined to leave us a lock of his hair, or even a photograph. 

The school-board is evidently in full swing at Blandford, 
for on Buckler asking for that celebrated place, he was told 
by a young ten-year-old, to " Go and larn his gogrefy," 
which Vas decidedly a "shut up " for him. 

There is a stiff hill to climb out of Blandford on the 
Dorchester road (which is the first turning to the left), but 
the surface was excellent, so it was ridden, though with a 
considerable loss of moisture. The road now began to get 
very hilly, in fact there is no stretch of level as far as 
Puddletown. There are two rather awkward hills which 
require care, as they are long and finish up with a very 
steep, rough pitch, into the villages at the bottom. One 
is about three miles and the other five miles from Blandford. 
Three miles from Blandford, we had to put up in a cowshed 
for shelter from a heavy storm of rain, which left the roads 
with deep gutters across them. 

Tea was obtained at an old-fashioned house in Whit- 
church, after which Puddletown was reached with only one 
stoppage, on account of the rain. The road to Dorchester 
was more level, but was not remarkable for surface, and 
the bit of genuine macadam in Dorchester made us feel 



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quite like liome. We did not stop, but turning to the left 
at the top of the street soon left the town, and spun along 
a piece of grand level road alongside the railwa}'. Two 
miles from Dorchester the north side of Ridgeway Hill 
was attacked and defeated, and the southern slope gently 
ridden for some 200 yards. Here we dismounted and stood 
on a wall to admire the scenery. The panorama before us 
was one of the most beautiful we Iiad ever seen. Far, far 
do^vn under our feet was the village of Upway. Five miles 
off was Weymouth, with its shipping and harbour, and the 
little headland crowned by the Nothe fort. On our left 
was the famed white horse, cut in the chalk hills, some 
four miles off ; and the coast line could be seen past Lul- 
worth, stretching far away. But the most striking object 
of all was Portland, about eight miles off, which rose up 
out of the sea, with all its bluff and rugged grandeur, the 
great Vem forts showing their angry fronts, to the left of 
Chesilton. The Chesil Bank connecting it with the main- 
land looked like a thread, whilst the splendid breakwater, 
with its great ironclad forts, jutted far across the bay. In 
the roadstead lay the turret ship Thunderer^ and many 
white sails of pleasure boats. The stretch of country on 
our right looked extremely beautiful, with its numerous 
villages, and the sun setting behind the hills. After enjoying 
the scene for awhile we commenced the descent of the hill, 
which had better be walked, as it is very steep and has a 
most dangerous corner half way down. The road into 
Weymouth is pretty fiat but is rough macadam. 

Riding by the long parade, we attracted more notice 
than we cared for from the numerous strollers, who seemed 
to wonder where we liad come from, as we sped silently 
along towards the pier. We found most comfortable and 
cheap accommodation at '' Drew's Commercial Temperance 
Hotel," in St. Thomas Street, We took a walk over the 
bridge along the Nothe before tea, and afterwards did a 
little shopping. 

Palmer Dalton. 
(To be continued.) 



GENERAL MEET. 



The General Meet of last Saturday met with very fair 
success, considering the time of year, difficulty of access, 
and, above all, the utterly awful state of the roads. It 
would seem extremely unfortunate that, just after making 
arrangements for holding the first General Meet in the 
North-East District, a storm of unexampled severity should 
have visited the neighbourhood, with the effect of tearing 
up every single road and lane for miles around. It will 
certainly be a long time before they are in statu quo, and 
until the N.E. members have "mended their ways" it is 
difficult to conceive how their ensuing runs are to be carried 
out. It was hardly to be expected that members of distant 
Districts should "take their journey into a far country" 
for the purpose of a long run through dust and brickbats, 



but, nevertheless, every District was represented in the 
following proportions :--N.E., 6; N.W., 11; W., 3; 
S.W., 3 ; S.E., 1. Nairn, we are informed, rode from 
Charing Cross, through the City, to the starting point, and 
Potts came from Mortlake and back The N.W. members 
rode from Hampstead, vid Hornsey, Tottenham, Hoe Street, 
and Walthamstow, reaching Syborn's Comer some ten 
minutes before the other Districts arrived. A start was 
effected from this point at 5 o'clock, and the Club proceeded 
through Whip's Cross, Snaresbrook, and Woodford, the 
roads, as yet, presenting a tolerable surface. After a short 
stoppage near the " Castle," caused by a restive horse, the 
modern road through the Forest was pursued, and at the 
"Robin Hood" the road to the left, vid High Beech, 
through, perhaps, the prettiest part of the Forest, but, alas ! 
sadly monopolised by beanfeasters and other roaring 
revellers. The splendid view from the "King's Oak" 
claimed a glance, but, as the members were in the saddle, 
" going it " on the grass, it was not appreciated to the full. 
After passing the " Wake Arms " the road was a shade 
better, and then worse again into Eppiug. The " Old 
Thatched House " was reached at 7.0, and, after a general 
recourse to the pump, twenty-five men sat down to a very 
capital tea, for which thanks are due to Mr. Godlee for 
having made all necessary arrangements. Most of those 
from " foreign parts " wisely elected to stay the night, but 
the N.E. and N.W. got under weigh at 8.30, separating at 
the " Wake Arms," the N.W. turning off to Waltham 
Abbey, hoping to meet with better roads. Up to 
Waltham, the road for about three miles is entirely 
destroyed, having been under four feet of water; its 
condition is exactly similar to the beach at Brighton, 
and riding, except at intervals, was therefore impossible. 
From Waltham, however, the roads were good, though 
dusty, through Forty Hill, Enfield, and Palmer's Green, 
where a division took place — one party going by South- 
gate, Colney Hatch, and Finchley, and the other by Wood 
Green, Holloway, and Camden Town. The N.E. men 
reached home without adventure over the same roads as 
before. Present : Alison, Bacon, E. H. Barrett, Buckler, 
H. T. Clark, Dalton, Devitt, Freeman, Freeth, F. Godlee, 
T. Godlee. Hutchings, H. Jennings, E. E, Jessel, Langmore, 
Marchant, Metcalfe, N. B. Morris, Nairn, Potts, Powell, 
Turner, J. W. Wilson, Woodall, and a visitor. 



N.W. DISTRICT. 

Several members having expressed a desire to have a 
weekly evening run, there ^vill be a Meet at " Jack Straw's " 
next Thursday, and subsequently, until further notice, at 
7.15 p.m. 

N.B. — ^The run to Rickmansworth will be vid Pinner 

Moor Park. Members are reminded of the facilities for 

* 

bathing. 

J. W. Alison, Dist. Capt. 



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LONDON BICYCLE CLUB GAZETTE. 



LONDON BICYCLE CLUB MEETS. 

July 20. 

N.E. Distriet — ^Lea Bridge Boad, 3.30 p.m. for Upminster. 
N.W. District— " JsLck Straw's Caatle," at 4.0 p.m., for 

Rickmansworth. 
W. District — ^Kew Green, at 4.0 p.m., for Bumham 

Beeches. Meet S.W. District at Harlington Comer 

at 4.45. 
S.W. District—" The Clarence," Teddington, at 4.0 p.m., 

for Bumham Beeches. Meet W. District at Har- 
lington Comer, at 4.45. 
8.E. District (Croydon Division). — Central Croydon Station, 

at 40. p.m., for Westerham via Sandersted. 
8.E. District (Blackheath Division).— Foot of College Park 

Hill, Lewisham, for Westerham via Bromley. 

July 27. 
N.E. District— iMk Bridge Road, at 3.30 p.m., for Ongar. 
N.W. District— " JBxk Straw's Castle," at 4.0 p.m., for 

Hatfield via Mims. 
W. District — ^Kew Green, at 4.0 p.m., for Horseley Towers 

via Leatherhead, retum by Ockham. 
S.W. District. — Surbiton Station, at 4.0 p.m., for Dorking. 

Meet S.E. District. 
S.E. District (Croydon Division), — Central Croydon Station, 

at 3.45 p.m., for Dorking. Meet S.W. District. 
S.E. District (Blackheath Division).— Foot of Collie Park 

Hill, Lewisham, for Sevenoaks. 

August 3, 
N.E. District.— Top of Lea Bridge Road, 8.30 p.m., for 

Harlow. 
N.W. District— " JeLck Straw's Castle," 4 p.m., for 

Watford. 
W. District — ^Eew Green, 4 p.m., for Amersham vid 

Ruislip. 
S.W. District— 8\xrhiton Station, 3.30 p.m., for Dorking. 
S.E. District (Croydon Division).— Antral Croydon Station, 

4.30 p.m. for Reigate. Meet B. Division. 
SE. District (Blackheath Division).— Foot of College Park 

Hill, Lewisham, at 3.30 p.m., for Reigate. Meet 

C. Division. 

August 10. 
N.E. District.— ^toke Newington Green, 8.30 p.m., for 

Hertford. 
N.W. District— ' Js/ck Sraw's Castle," 8.45 p.m., for 

Hertford. 
W. District. — Kew Green, 4 p.m., for Stoke Pogis. 
S.W. District — Surbiton Station, 3.30 p.m., for Virginia 

Water, by Chertsey, returning by Staines. 
S.E. District (Croydon Division). — Central Croydon Station, 

4 p.m., for Staines. Meet S.W. District. 
S.E. District (Blackheath Division).— Foot of College Park 

Hill, 3.30 p.m., for Famingham. 



RACING FIXTURES. 

July 20th.— Temple Bicycle Club, L.A.C. Grounds, Stam- 
ford Bridge. 1 Mile Handicap. Entries 
(2s. 6d) close July 8th, to H. Etherington, 
East Temple Chambers, Whitefriars Street, 
Fleet Street. Handicapper, John Keen. 

July 27th.— Joint Stock Banks' Athletic Club, L.A.C. 
Grounds, Stamford Bridge. 4 miles Bicycle 
Handicap. Entries (2s. 6d.) close July 20th, 
to W. Basan, Hon. Sec, 28, Highbury New 
Park, N. 

July 27th.— Brighton Bicycle Club Race Meeting. 

Aug. lOth.— Stanley Bicycle Club, Alexandra Park. 
2 miles Handicap. Entries (2s. 6d.) to be 
made to J. R. Airey, Esq., 14, Bushey 
Phice, Camden Road, N.W. Handicapper, 
M. D. Riicker, Jun. 

Aug. 17th.— Tower Hamlets Bicycle Club Race Meeting 
at Alexandra Palace. 



EXCHANGE LIST. 



(Two Insertions, not exceeding three lines, for Is.) 

58-in. Stassen, front-wheel brake, new last season, price 
£12.— J. F. Marchant, 59, Bemers-street, W. 

For Sale, 52-inch '' Special Challenge," new last year, 
and still in good condition. Carter brake. Price £l2. 
H. R. Boyce, 35, Warrington Crescent, W. 

For Sale, cheap, 66-inch racing "Humber." Address 
Gilbert F. Beck, Chislehurst, Kent. 

For Sale. — 54-inch Stassen, eccentric brake, leg rests, 
bag, oilcan, and spanner. In perfect order. Price, £l2. — 
P. D., 29, South Hill Park, Hampstead. 

For Sale. — 54^inch Keen's Eclipse Racer. Very little 
used, and in perfect condition. Price, £lO. — G. A. E. 
Pollock, Trinity College, Cambridge. 



SOUTHERN MEET. 

A party will leave the Marble Arch at 5.45 a.m. on 
Saturday, the 27th inst. (Central Croydon Station at 7 a.m.) 
to attend the Southem Meet at Brighton. Several have 
promised to come ; and some wiU retum to London by 
road the same day. Will any member intending to join 
kindly drop me a card. 

12, Belsize Road. A. J. Bacon. 

Some one lent me a " Stock Exchange" pencil-case at 
the P.B.G. Meeting at the A.P. He can have it by sending 
a card to address below. 

F.J. 
37, Downs Road, Clapton, E., 

July 15th, 1878. 



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LONDON BICYCLE CLUB GAZETTE. 



119 



To the Editor qf th§ London Bicycle Club Gazette. 

Sib, — On Saturday last I rode with another member to 
Guildford, and having previously consulted the club-list of 
hotels, put up at the " White Hart," classed A, viz., the 
lower tariff. The charge for a very plain tea was 3s. each, 
and our bill contained an item of Is. for "apartments," 
which, I presume, referred to our having made use of the 
coffee-room and smoking-room. Seeing that this hotel is 
classed among the more moderate, it seems to me not 
unreasonable to ask what one may expect to pay at those 
hotels charging according to the higher tariff. — Tour 
obedient servant, Abthxtb H. Rolls. 

London, 15th July, 1878. 

To the Editor of the London Bicycle Club Gazette. 
Dbab Sir, — Is the following a correct solution of the double 
acrostic of July 4th ? I do not wish to be hypercritical, but 
can an adjective (6) " be kept in view," and should not the 
meaning of initials and finals be given enigmatically? 

1. Bath. 

2. lona.^ 

3. Caution. 

4. Yard. 

5. Gherubini. 

6. Laconic. 

7. Eva. 

8. Rap. 

9. Aide-de-camp. 

10. Cape. 

11. Error. 

Bicycle Race— Handicapper. 

Yours truly, 
July 8th, 1878. A. S. Isteb. 

To the Editor of the London Bicycle Club Gazette. 
Sib, — ^I have been studying with a good deal of wistful 
regret the pages of my private cash-book and page 7 of our 
first number about hotel bills. ''Members," I am told, 
would then be able to calculate the extent of their lia- 
bilities." Would that it.were so ! Our simple teas and 
sober dmners may not have much decreased in quality, 
but the artful tacking on of occasional sixpences has much 
increased their price. The two-shilling tea has been pro- 
moted to half-a-crown, and the half-crown dinner (pleasant 
half hour it was with thabest of English joints) has at- 
tained the occidental proportions of three ksd sixpence. 
Oh, Mr. Editor, I do not wish to gush, but if I am to ride 
at all I must feed ; and if this series of perpetual demands 
for sixpence extra goes on, I shall cram my M.LP. with 
biscuits, bread and junk,— take my pure drink firom the 
untainted stream with the aid of a medicinal flask, — and 
desert those pleasant rooms in pretty way-side inns, which 
(with all their fascinating beauty) are rapidly tending 
toward atrocity in chaiges little less than Bulgarian. — 
I am, yours, &c. Limixed Ikoome. 



To the Editor of the London Bicycle Club Gazette. 
Dear Sm — Few of the S.E. Division appear to know 
that there is good bathing after eight in the evening at 
Eeston Lakes. Several members have met at Central 
Croydon at seven on Mondays and Wednesdays to ride 
over together, and as many as eight bathed on Monday 
night, and possibly more may feel inclined to come if it 
is only made known. Distance from Croydon, about 
eight miles. Yours faithfully, 

E. H. Cabb. 



THE LAST NEW BRAKE. 
To the Editor qf the London Bicycle Club Gazette. 
As I was riding down the hill through Welwyn a few 
days ago, a small boy threw a cap, which alighted in my 
hind wheel and was carried round and caught in the hind 
fork ; here it answered the purpose of a first rate hind- 
wheel brake, nearly stopping the wheel. Getting off at the 
foot of the hill, I took the cap out and found that it was a 
tolerably new velveteen Scotch cap. The tyre on the 
wheel had worn a fair-sized hole in it, so that, for once, the 
cap-thrower got decidedly the worst of it: 

T. C. C. 



To the Editor qf the London Bicycle Club Gazette. 
Deab Sib,— On Saturday week three of our amphibious 
members— viz., Messrs. Sewell, Newman, and Cleaver, com- 
peted in the Norwood Swimming Races. The two last- 
mentioned, although swimming in very good form, were 
uQsuccessful, but Sewell, who is a very promising swimmer, 
managed to secure two prizes — ^viz., second in the 100 
Yards Open Handicap, and third in the Open 500 Yards 
Handicap, Davenport, the amateur champion, being scratch 
in the last-mententioned race. C. 



NOTICE TO CORRESPONDENTS. 

All contributions must be addressed to "The Editor, 
L.B.C. GA2ETTE, 35, Eastcheap, E.C," and must bear the 
name of the author, though not necessarily for insertion. 

They must be written on one side of the paper only, 
and, if immediate insertion is desired, must be received not 
later than Tuesday morning. 

No communication of a personal character will be pub- 
lished without the writer's name being appended. 

Copies can be obtained at Goy's, Leadenhall Street, RC, 
price 4d., or post free at 4^d., on application to the Editor. 

Non-Members may, upon approval by the Committee, 
subscribe for the whole year at lOs. 6d., post free, the right 
being reserved of cancelling the subscription, upon return- 
ing the balance less the value of copies abready supplied at 
4^ per copy. 

TO CORRESPONDENT. 
Double AGBOsna — Next week. 



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LONDON BICYCLE CLUB GAZETTE. 



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BICYCLE OUTFIHER, CLUB UNIFORMS, 

AND SUNDRIES. 

PURCHASE 

TOUR 

BICYCLE 



OK 



GOY'S NEW PLAN. 

All the Beit Makes at Manufacturer's Prices. 
By arrang^ement with the Manufacturers orders have the same 
attention as if forwarded direct to the Works, thiis saving the buyer 
a deal of trouble. 

IMMEDIATE DELIVERY. 
Write for Particular $ and Price Lists. 



TRICYCLES for Ladies or Gentlemen. 
YOUTHS' BICYCLE S. 

GOY'S CLUB ROOM, 

MOST CENTRALLY SITUATED. 

Offered FREE to Officers of all Clubs to arrange Matches, 
Committee Meetings, Ac. 



(K)Y,{''^,;giaMi.ggr*'}London, RO. 

THE ALERT BICYCLE FOR 1878. 

The only Bicycle that is fitted with an Adjustable Poller Bearing, every 

roller of which is warranted to tighten equally towards the centre. 

For further particulars apply to tne Manufacturer, 

£• OATVJ^ER, KiiffTineer, AI^KHT IfTOIlKII, 

LITTLE GOWER PLACE, EUSTON ROAD, N.W. 

(One minute's walk from Gower Street Station.)^ 

Biqfdes of all kinds Jtepaired on the sliorUat notice, 

A BOON TO BICYCLISTS. 

BICYCLE RIDING TAUGHT PERFECTLY 

AT THE 

OXirr BIOTOLE SCHOOL, 

The largest in London. 

Single Lesson, Is. 6d. Perfect Riding firuaranteed, 10s, 

Address-CHBQUBR YARD, 
OPPOSITE ALDGATE METROPOLITAN STATION* 

ALDGATE HIGH STREET. 

TEAOHER-PROFESSOR T. QUINTON. 

CHAMPION ORNAMEMTAL BIDEB. 

THE EMPRESS 

Is acknowledged as the best Roadster. Stroug, durable, and easy run- 
ning. Always gives satisfaction. Strongly recommended by members 
of London Bicycle and other Clubs. 

Sole Agent: T. A. 8MILY, DALSTON JUNCTION, E. 

THE NORWOOD. 

A newly-designed light Roadster. A very elegant machine. Will 
stand plenty of work. Weight of 52-inch, 40 lb. City Agent ; — 

e/ 21, LEADENHALL STREET, ) r^^^^^ pp 
g{ 54, LIME STREET , } ^^^^^' ^•^• 

W. KEEN, Empress Bicycle Works, Norwood Junction, S.E. 
Frice Lists, One IStamp. 



THE BICYCLE OF THE DAY FOR 1878 IS J. STASSEN'S " NONPAREIL" 

The only machine fitted with Screwless Spokes, warranted not to break 
or loosen ; patent eccentric brake easily applied and wonderfully effective ; 
new patent double-coned adjustable steering gear ; best red rubber tyres, 
f rictionless bearings, and all latest improvements. Every bicyclist ought 
to possess our Patent Circular-wheel Valise. These machines are made 
for work, and are the best and cheapest machines, as they require no 
repairs and never get out of order, and are strongly recommended by 
Members of the London Bicycle Club, and by all who have used them. 
Weight of machine, from 40 lb. or from 1 lb. per inch. ' 

City Agent: GOT, 21. Leadenludl Street. 
PEAKE8, Princes S treet, Leicester Square, London, W. 

J. 8TASSEN&SON, 261, EUSTON ROAD, N.W. 

Factory Entbai/ce : BEAUMONT PLACE. ' 
Prospectus Id., with Photo. Sd. All sizes kept in stock ready for delivery. 

AGENCY FOR ALL BEST BICYCLES. 

The best Bicycle support in use, weight 3| ounces, presented with each 
new Bicycle. Instruction free to purchasers ; if purchaser does not reside 
in or near London, arrangements made to lessen or obviate the expense of 
learning. Special Circular for the guidance of Bicyclists post free. 

T. A. SMILY. 17, DALSTON LANE, 
Nearly opposite Dalston Junctioii, Londoa, E.C. 

A REAL BOON T O BICYCItlSTS. 

PHIVER'S EXQUISITE MANUS ALBA, 

FOR THE HANDS AND FEET, 

Sent ly Post for \s. Sd. in Stamps, by the Ifholesale Agent, 

J, KASOIT, 120, Qoldhawk Boad, Shepherd*! Buih, London, W. 

IMPORTANT TO ALL. 
HABBISON'S ANTLCOREOSIVE PASTE, 

for Preventing Rust, 6d., Is., and Is. 9d. 

HABBISON'S POLISHING POWDEB 

instantly removes Bust and Corrosion from Metals, and for Polishing 
Glass, 6d., Is., and Is. 9d. (see advertisement in "Bicycling Times.") 

Free by post for 8, 1 4, and 24 stamps, of 

SHntTCLITF k CO., 66, Qoldhawk Bead, Shepherds Buih, London. W. 

THE 

GREAT WESTERN BICYCLE DEPOT, 

87. PRAED STREET, 

PADDINGTON. W. 

(Three minutes' walk from Great Western and Praed Street 
liailway Stations.) 

PROPRIETOBS : 

CROOKE & CO., 

AGENTS FOB ALL FIRST-CLASS BICYCLES 
AND TKICTCLES. 



BICYCLES BOUGHT, SOLD, OR EXCHANGED. 

BIOYOLES LET ON HIRE. 

Repairs promptly executed by competent Workmen, 

CHARGES MODERATE. 

BICYCLE SUNDRIES OF EVERY DESCRIPTION. 



Price Lists on Application. 

Within three minutes' walk of Jidgware lioad, Praed Street 

(Metropolitan), and Great Western liailway ^Stations, 
London, 1878. 



Printed for the Proprietors by Babltko k Son, at the Minerva Steam 
Printing Office, 35, Eastcheap, Loudon, E.C.— July 18, 1878. 



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' T engage done torn d foiter dans kurs eeriie taute personnalitf, toute allusion dipassant les limites de la discussion la 

plus sincire et la plus caurtoise,*^ — ^Laboulbbne. 



Vol. L No. 18.] 



Edited by A. OGIER WARD. [Thursday, July 25, 1878. 



CONTENTS. 



PAOE 

Notice 120 

The Highways Bill 120 

Bicycle Union 120 

Ladies' Challenge Prize 121 

Committee 121 

Saturday Knns 122 

Hampetead to Winchester, Christchurch, Bonmemouth, Bland- 
ford, Dorchester, and Weymouth (concludtd from our Uut) 122 
London to Venice and back to Heidelberg 123 



PAOl 

Weymouth to Bath via Dorchester, Sherborne, The Mendip Hills, 

Bniton, and Frome 128 

London to Oxford via Beading, Wallingford, and Dorchester 124 

London Bicycle Club Meets 125 

Double Acrostic 120 

Racing Fixtures 126 

Exchuige List 126 

Correspondence 126 

Notice to Correspondent , .^^^ 126 



NOTICE. 

The Editor begs to return thanks to those members who 
have kindly promised him some of their experiences in the 
matter of training. He will, however, be still more grateful 
when he actually receives the fruit of their labours in the 
course of the next few days. 



HIGHWAYS BILL. 



A deputation consisting of Messrs. G. F: Cobb, Barsar of 
Trinity College, Cambridge, and President of the Bicycle 
Union, N. Salamon, Chairman of the Coventry Machinist's 
Company, and C. R. Hutchings, Solicitor to the Bicycle 
Union, were, on Tuesday last, received by Mr. Sclater- 
Booth, President of the Local Government Board, on the 
introduction of Sir H. Jackson. 

The importance of bicycling, both as a sport and an 
industry, and the necessity for the clear definition of the 
legal status of bicycles having been explained to Mr. 
Sclater-Booth and copies of the suggested by-laws and the 
Union road rules having been handed to him, he replied : — 

That as to the first part of the question he was already 
well informed, since one of his sons was a bic}'clist, and that 
as to the second he would take care that when the time 
came (which would not be at present) for framing by-laws 
for theregulation of bicycles, the views of those interested 
in the matter should be fully considered. 

Lastly, the conflict of legal opinion as to whether bicycles 
are carriages or not could not, he said, be set at rest in the 



present Act. Those local authorities who legislate for 
bicycles as carriages must take their chance of error, and 
the only remedy would be a special Act introduced by Sir 
H. Jackson or some other firiend of bicycling next session. 

The deputation, having thanked the President for the 
attention with which he had heard them, then withdrew. 

The following are the By-Laws suggested by the Bicycle 
Union, which have been submitted to Mr. Sclater-Booth : — 

1. That every rider of a Velocipede using any highway, 
turnpike, main, or other roads, shall carry a bell or whistle, 
and shall use the same when overtaking any vehicle, person 
on horseback, or person walking in the roadway. Such 
rider shall also, after dark, carry a lamp showing a clear 
light. 

2. When more than four Velocipedes are ridden in com- 
pany the first and last riders only shall be compelled to use 
bells or whistles and lamps under Clause 1. 

3. The term Velocip^e shall include any vehicle the 
motive power of which is supplied by the rider or riders. 



BICYCLE UNION. 



In placing before the general body of bicyclists the 
accompanying recommendations in reference to road riding, 
which have been made as concise as possible, the Council 
of the Union would specially urge on every individual 
rider the desirability of extending to all that courtesy 
which he would have shown to himself. The present pre- 
judice against bicycling has been partiaUy caused (and 



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cannot but be fostered and increased) by a disregard to the 
feelings of other passengers on the road ; and, although 
the right of the bicyclist to the free use of the public high- 
way should be at all times maintained, any needless alter- 
cation should be studiously avoided. 

Recommendatioks in Reference to Road RmiNa. 

1. It is desirable that the rider should at all times keep 
to the left-hand side of the road, even if no vehicle be in 
sight ; and riding on the footway should never be resorted 
to. The rules of the road should be strictly adhered to ; 
t.d. in meeting any vehicle or rider, always keep to the left ; 
in overtaking anything which is going in the same direction 
as the rider, pass on the right ; but on meeting or passing 
a led horse, take that side of the road on which the man is 
who is leading the animal. 

2. Under no circumstances should a rider pass on the 
wrong side of a vehicle ; as, in the event of an accident, 
he thereby renders himself liable for damages. 

3. Before overtaking any passenger on the road a signal 
should be given, and whilst at a sufficient distance to allow 
such passenger time to look round before the rider passes. 

4. On no account pass between two riders when overtaking 
them ; riders, upon hearing a signal from any man wishing 
to pass, should take close order to the left, and, if the road 
be narrow, take order in single file. 

5. On forming single from double file, the right-hand 
man should fall to the rear of his companion. 

6. In turning a comer the rider should moderate his 
pace, and should give a signal unless he can see a sufficient 
distance ahead -to be assured that no vehicle is near, and 
that no foot passenger is crossing or about to cross. 

7. In turning a corner to the right, care should be taken 
to leave sufficient room for any vehicle to pass on its own 
side, as some drivers are particularly fond of swinging round 
a comer at a fast pace. 

8. Foot passengers on the road should not be needlessly 
shouted at, but should be courteously warned, and be given 
a wide berth— especially at crossings. 

9. Care should be taken by the bicyclist not to startle 
any horse by passing at a high rate of speed, and upon 
meeting one which shows signs of restiveness, a dismount 
should invariably be made, if requested by the driver, and 
in as quiet a manner as possible; it is, however, frequently 
desirable to ride slowly by, speaking to the horse, as a 
sudden dismount may frighten the animal. 

10. The ground in front of a horse should not be taken 
until the bicyclist is at least ten yards ahead. 

11. In company riding — 

(a) The leader, on passing anyone, should an- 
nounce that others are following. 

{b) The leader should, at all times, give sufficient 
notice, to allow those in the rear to slacken 
speed, before easing up himself. 



{c) When descending a hill, the machine should 

be kept thoroughly under control, and riders 

should not msh past those preceding them, 

with feet off the pedals. 

12. For night riding a lamp should be used to signify to 

other passengers the whereabouts of the bicyclist ; and in 

frequented thoroughfares waming should be given by bell, 

or in some noticeable manner, of his otherwise noiseless 

approach. 



LADIES' CHALLENGE PRIZE. 

A young lady, very much interested in the noble sport of 
bicycling, wishes to know if there are any others willing to 
assist in giving a " Ladies' Challenge Prize " to the London 
Bicycle Club. 

Please communicate with A. L. 0. B., care of W. T. 
Thorn, jun., 11, Ladbroke Square, W. 



COMMITTEE 

At the meeting of the Committee, held on the 22nd inst, 
the following gentlemen were elected members : — 

Name and Addms. Profanlmi. Propoaer. Saeoadcr. 

WalterT.HUl,47,BelBize 

Avenue, Hampstead... Stadent A. H. Cook H. C. YifliGk 

Charles Shard, Hanover Banker's 

Cottage, West Dulwich Clerk B. H. Shcnrt S. Whitehead 

The resignation of Mr. Julius Meyer was accepted. 

Head-Quabtbrs. 
Messrs. Riicker, Neville, and Wyndliam were appointed 
to serve ou a Sub-Committee, to report on any possible 
improvement in this direction. 

Thb Sub-Editoe. 
It was proposed by Mr. Jolly, seconded by Mr. Coleman, 
and resolved unanimously, that Mr. J. Scott Stokes, as 
Sub-Editor, be added to the Committee. 

The Gazette. 
It was decided to lower the price for sale to members to 
Id., and that this should apply to back numbexs. 

Evening Race MEBTiNa. 
It was decided to hold an evening Bace Meeting in 
August. One event, open; distance 3 miles; entries 
limited to 50. Members will be admitted free only on pro- 
duction of badges, non-members by pa}'ment at the gates. 
Nottckete. Further particulars to follow. Messrs. Coleman, 
Newman, Riicker, TroUope, and Wyndham were appointed 
to serve on a Sub-Committee to arrange details. 

Briohtok Meet. 
It was decided that, as the Club would not be repre- 
sented at the above Meet officially, attendance thereat do 

not count as a Club run. 

C. R. HuTCHiNGS, Hon, Sec. 



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SATUKDAY RUNS. 
N.E. District. 
It is very uncertain who attended the run in this district 
on Saturday, technically speaking. No one, as far as can 
be ascertained, ever reached or left the meeting-place. 
Two members, however, and a visitor left Wliip's Cross 
about 4.20 p.m., picked up another member at Ilford, and 
were joined at Upminster by a fourth member, who had 
waited at Syborn's Corner in the hope of some one coming 
that way. The Ilford and Romford road was again found 
unusually good for the N.E., as at present constituted, and 
the run enjoyable, in spite of a strong head-wind, but the 
hill into Upminster was very loose and stony, and necessi- 
tated a general dismount. While tea was being prepared, 
the company adjourned to bathe, discarding a certain 
notice board to the contrary, which holds up penalties as 
a warning to those who do so, but unfortunately there was 
not more than three feet of water, so it it was voted not 
quite up to the mark, though refreshing. The ride home was 
effected without adventure, the Walthamstow members 
getting in about ten. Present : Ernest Barrett, C. L. 
Devitt, Theo. Godlee, J. W. Wilson, and a visitor. 



N.W. DiSTEICT. 



July 20th, — Tlie run to Rickmansworth secured a very 
fair attendance, most of those present being attracted by 
the prospect of a bathe, as previously notified. The out- 
ward journey was made via Hendon and Edgeware, and by 
Whitchurch Lane to Stanmore. From here to Pinner 
Green the road was well harrowed up, recalling reminiscences 
of Epping. At Batchworth Heath we entered Moor Park, 
with little advantage, however, as to the road, which occa- 
sioned some very abrupt dismounts. Putting up at the 
" Swan," we went for a bathe in the canal, or Colne Navi- 
gation, at the place which the Western District discovered. 
After a hot run this was keenly enjoyed, and put us in good 
trim for tea and the run home. Taking the upper road to 
Watford, and keeping the main road all the way, we found 
the surfSace uniformly good. This is now the best road to 
be met with in this district, and is in capital condition from 
London to Aylesbury, excepting Clay Hill. Distance 36 
miles. Present : Alison, Bacon, Buckler, Dalton, Freeth, 
Marcliant, N. B. Morris, Nevill, Sharman, Tegetmeier, and 
a visitor. 

N.B. Members are no doubt aware that all the roads in 
the neighbourhood of Hatfield are quite unridable. The 
run thither, via Mimms, if carried out as projected, would 
entail two or three miles of walking over shingle. Under 
these circumstances it will be advisable to run to Elstree, 
where there is bathing accommodation in the reservoir. 
J. W. Alison, District Captain. 



S.E. District.— Blackheath Division. 
JtUy 20th. — ^A pleasant ride by Hither Green Lane, and 



a roughish one through Bromley, brought us to Keston 
Ponds, in which we were constrained to bathe our fevered 
brows, while from their pellucid spring we drank deeply ; 
then, over a very pleasant road, we ran into Westerham, 
marvelling greatly at tlie dreadful hill which bears its 
name, and shuddering at the melancholy narrative of 
broken limbs with which our cheerful D.C. enlivened the 
toilsome descent. By the bye, is it true the impetuous 
Walter Meyer has safely negotiated the latter ? The 
Croydon men did not turn up, so we settled down to a good 
tea, smoked the usual post-prandial pipes, and started for 
home. At Eeston, which we reached at 9 p.m., a bathe 
was suggested, and a swim — than which some of us have 
never had one more luxurious — was much enjoyed. Our 
happiness was completed when on passing the Palace its 
pyrotechnical delights filled us with joy, and, thanking the 
philanthropical directors who gave such good things to the 
suburban residents, requiring of them neither fee nor re- 
ward, we sought our various hom&s. Total distance, 
37 miles. Present : Cyril l\irner, C. W. H. Dicker, C. E. 
Law, R. J. Scott, R. H. Curtis, Ashley Barrett. 



Wednesday Run— Western Division, 
June 17th, — Three men met at Folly Lane, Acton, at 
7.20 p.m., and were joined at Acton Station, 6. W. R., 
by five others ; the route taken was Horn Lane, Willesden, 
Kingsbury, Roebuck Lane, Edgeware, Brockley Hill, Stan- 
more Heath, past Bentley Priory, Kenton Lane, Wembly 
Park, and Harrow Road. Distance from head-quarters 
30 miles, all arriving home after a pleasant moonlight run 
by half-past eleven. Present: Butler, N. B. Morris, Freeth, 
Thorn, jun., Bruce, F. Desboeux, E. Scott, and W. J. F. 
Potts. 

The run next Wednesday will be via Horn Lane and 
Harlesden Green to " Crown," Cricklewood (about six miles 
from Folly Lane), where we hope to see some of our N.W. 
friends at 8 p.m. ; from Cricklewood a run will be taken to 
Hendon and Finchley. Total distance about 20 miles. 



HAMPSTEAD TO WINCHESTER, CHRISTCHURCH, 
BOURNEMOUTH, BLANDFORD, DORCHESTER 
AND WEYMOUTH. 

(Concluded from our last.) 

Next morning we had a swim, and after break&st had 
our photos taken with our 'cycles, and then hired a boat 
for the day, which we provisioned, and, starting oflf, we 
rowed round the Nothe to Sandsfoot Castle, which is in 
ruins, and which 'Any has decorated with his signature 
from top to bottom. On starting we had to encounter a 
strong head wind and a rough sea, and at times our progress 
was quite a yard in a minute. There is a little strip of 
sand at Sandsfoot Castle, so we landed there, and procured 
a rock about as big as a coal-scuttle, to which we tied the 



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painter, and dropped overboard, by way of an anchor, and 
then shoved off, and, lying down in the boat, were gently 
"rocked in the cradle of the deep." After an hour's 
leisure we " weighed " our rock, and pulled all round the 
bay to Portland, minutely inspecting the " Thunderer " as 
we passed. We then went the whole length of the break- 
water, and well away into the east bay, where we easied 
and cast anchor, but though it wouldn't reach the bottom, 
yet it kept us from drifting, although it " put her down by 
the head " a good deal 

Resuming our oars, we soon reached Weymouth, after a 
seven hours' cruise, greatly to the delight of " old Johnny," 
who had been watching our doings with a telescope, and 
who seemed to think that we had tried to get to France. 
In the evening we had a most enjoyable ten mile spin to 
the " Whitie Horse" on the hills near Osmington, the very 
long hill up through Preston being ridden at a fast pace. 
I was afterwards told that the W.B.C. have a great respect 
for that hill, and consider it rather more than a joke. 

In the morning Buckler left me at 7 a.m. to ride to Bath, 
whilst I went for a swim. I may here mention that Wey- 
mouth is well-known for its mullet, and I recommend those 
passing this way to try some. 

I left Weymouth by the mid-day train for Devizes, to 
try the road for Monday's race ; and I met Marchant (who 
had ridden down from town) in the market-place by acci- 
dent. He waited while I ran on to Beckhampton and back ; 
and then we wended our way through Melksham and Cor- 
sham to Bath, where we arrived about 8 o'clock, — Buckler 
having already arrived. I leave him to tell his own tale 
about his ride from Weymouth to Bath. 

Palmer Dalton. 



WEYMOUTH TO BATH VIA DORCHESTER, SHER- 
BORNE, THE MENDIP HILLS, BRUTON, AND 
FROME. 
The clocks were striking seven as I rode along the 
esplanade, and with a last look at the sea, I soon left 
Weymouth behind me, and in about half an hour's time, 
was walking the renowned Ridgway Hill. At the top of 
the ascent I turned round to enjoy the prospect, but to my 
surprise the sea and adjacent hills were completely hid from 
view by dense vapoury clouds. Three miles, nearly all 
down hill, and Dorchester is reached ; turning to left up 
the main street and to the right at the end of the town, 
after about half a mile the road branches off into two — ^both 
seem to go to Cerne Abbas ; I took the left, and had no 
reason to repent my choice. The eight miles to Geme were 
soon accomplished ; the scenery is very pretty and the 
gradients mild. At Cerne I had a good breakfast, at a 
moderate charge. Cerne to Sherborne is very good going, 
hilly in parts, but nothing at all to complain of. A few 
minutes before entering Sherborne I had the pleasure of 
seeing some piles of ooUte all ready for mending the roads, 



" soils changing " thought I, and in another minute, with a 
bump from the machine and a sigh from the rider, Dorsetshire 
gravel was left behind, and oolite was the order of the day. 

After riding through Sherborne the rider must turn 
sharp to the right, and then to left The road from thence 
to Bruton is a succession of steep hills, and I. bad a good 
many pretty long walks up and down. The down-hills were 
very troublesome, very steep, with plenty of sharp comers* 
surface bad, cut up in places with farm traffic whilst wet, 
and dried into ruts. 

After climbing an almost perpendicular cliff to get, as I 
thought, a splendid view, including, perchance, a glimpse 
of the Bristol Channel, my disgust was intense to find 
plenty of hiUs in front of me, much higher than the range 
on which I stood, and the only view was behind me, where, 
in the far distance, about thirty miles off, I fancied I could 
see the sea through a break in the Downs. The bright 
'cycle looked very inipressing from my ^vantage post with 
the sunshine playing ou it. 

After studying geography with some road menders, and 
refreshing myself from thieir cider barrel, I pushed on to 
Bruton. A short stoppage Siere, and I commenced the long 
ascent on the Frome road, cJi which I had heard so much 
all day, but, as usual, this bug war turned out to be not so 
bad after all, for, with the excepWn of a short piece in the 
middle, I rode all the rest, but iW the advantage of a 
nice breeze behind me. The summiiVbeing reached, there 
is nothing to trouble one, and a prettXhut rather bumpy 
ride on a high plateau brings the 'cyclisSlto *« somewhat 
mountainousstreets of Prome, down which I preferred to walk. 

The Bath and Warminster road is struck * ^^^ "^'^ 
from Frome, and as this road has been describe ^ recently 
in the L.B.C. Gazette, I will make no mentioiV^ ^* ^^^^ 
By the time I got into Bath my uniform was so *DQpl®*^^y 
smothered in white oolite dust that it took the Bo<?l®. ^^ 
"White Lion" and the clothes brush all their ^^ ^ 
make me look presentable. Shortly afterwards P***^'^ 
arrived, with Marchant. We then had tea and spe^ ® 
evening together. \ 

LONDON TO VENICE AND BACK TO HEIDELBj)^^- 

Estimated at 1500 Miles. 
More than eighteen months ago, a friend and fe| 
member of the L.B.C. placed in my hands a small 
published by Tinsley Brothers in 1875, and entitled " 
to Vienna by Bicycle," which described how the jour 
was successfrilly accomplished by Mons. A. Laumaille 
native of " La Belle France." Since that time the lit^ 
work has fascinated me, and, although frequently laid asi 
it has ever turned up again, and seemed to say, '' Why do 
you do something like this?" to which I mentally answer 
" Wait awhile, my friend." Old customs are strong, a 
hitherto shanks' mare has served me very well during ma' 
summer holidays, from sandy Pomerania on the tidelcj 



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Baltic to sunny Switzerland with its lakes and mountains, 
from Channel Islands in the west to Hartz Mountains and 
the dual kingdom east, and I naturally feel loth to try new 
ways; butnecessityknowethnochoice, and having been foolish 
enough to burden myself with the Old Man of the Sea in the 
shape of a competition for ... I must give up all idea 
of tramping over snowy Alpine passes in glorious solitude, 
of being lost in vast forests which require time and patience 
to emerge from again, of wading through never-ending and 
sinuous brooks, or of climbing up to fine old ruins situate 
on peaks high above the rivers or valleys beneath, which, 
although seemingly so close, take far more work and time 
than the uninitiated would dream of. Now good roads are 
the chief point, and I have scanned narrowly the best maps 
for them, not, as was once my wont, for- the minutest foot 
or bridle path ; and finally, thinking Venice were a worthier 
destination than Vienna (other considerations being scenery 
and surface of roads, vide the latter part of M. Laumaill^'s 
journey), I have resolved to attempt to ride the steel horse 
from London to Venice, and must make the attempt alone, 
it appears, for a companion for such a journey is, as we all 
know, a very difficult person to meet with. Whether it is 
best to journey alone or in company it is hard to say ; each 
side of the question has its merits and its disadvantages. 
N.B. The distance from Paris to Vienna, measured on map, 
is, in the book I have named, stated to be 760 miles. As 
far as I can judge, London to Venice will be not much 
under 1000 miles. 

I propose to leave London — ^Blackheath Hill Station 
(L. 0. & D. Railway) — on Friday, August 9th, between four 
and six o'clock, and running the same evening to Ospringe 
or Canterbury, manage to catch on the following morning 
the steamer from Dover to Calais, and then to " make tracks" 
to Venice. The route will be as follows : — Calais, St. Omer, 
Douay, Cambray, Hirson, M^zieres, Sedan, Verdun, Toul, 
Nancy, Luneville, St. Die, The Vosges Mountains, Colmar, 
Breisach, Freiberg, SchaflFhausen, St. Gallen, Feldkuch, 
the Arlberg Pass, Landeck, the Finstermunz Pass, Mais, 
Botzen Trent, the Val Lagana, Borgo, Feltre, Treviso and 
Venice ; and if there is time left me, I intend to return 
via Treviso, Conegliano, Cortina, Brunnecken, the Brenner 
Pass, Innsbruck, Beuthe, the Gacht Pass, Immenstadt, 
Lindau (take steamer across Lake Constance), Tutlingen, 
Horb, Pforzheim, Eppingen and Heidelberg, where I 
shall take ticket home. It will be at once seen by 
any traveller that this is a tremendous journey for 
three weeks, but " nothing attempted nothing done," and 
I shall be content if I reach Venice " sain et sauf." We 
are all of us aware what a trifle may upset the best ar- 
ranged plan, and some may think that I am premature 
in writing this preliminary account with the chance 
of succeeding so very small, but I do so because I feel 
that it will give me encouragement to persevere when those 
moments of depression arrive (and arrive they assuredly will) 



if I know that some fellow-members are wishing me good luck, 
and that I am not therefore absolutely alone on my journey, 
and further, because it is surely best to let others know 
what you are trying to do, and to let them witness your 
success or failure ; not only, as is too often the case, to tell 
them of the former after the result. To conclude, I will 
forward my progress daily to the Gazette, so that those 
interested therein may read. Of course I can furnish no 
account whatever of the journey till I return, and even 
then only with the permission of the above-mentioned Old 
Man of the Sea. W. C. Feebth. 

12, Alexandra Road, N.W., 22nd July, 1878, 
Any information as to the road between Calais and 
Sedan, or as to " miasma " south of Botzen, will be most 
gratefully received, but must be sent at once. 
[We wish Mr. Freeth all the success he deserves, and we 
shall be happy to hear from him as he proposes. — ^Ed.] 

LONDON TO OXFORD via READING, WALLIN6- 
FORD, AND DORCHESTER.— A Two Days' "Easy." 

I never take up my Gazette to look over the week's 
doings, but what my enjoyment of the same is immediately 
marred by the oft-repeated complaint of our worthy editor, 
that the members do not try to write. But in future my 
Gazette will be read with a clea^ conscience, knowing that, 
should this not appear, I for one have tried ; and should 
I experience the pleasure of reading my own work, that 
would suffice to stimulate to further exertions both of 
wheel and pen. Could every member look at it in this 
light, we should soon have the last of such unpleasant 
reminders. I am living in Oxford, and, being in London 
for a few days, I met my cousin Alex, of the I Zingari B.C., 
who asked me to ride back with him. This latter gentle- 
man, only lately having broken his head at Dorking, 
doubtless thought two better than one (not to break, 
certainly). Talking about broken heads, here is a 
suggestion — why not appoint a club surgeon ; everything 
necessary for a sudden spill could be comfortably carried 
on the handles; and these sudden spills, it is useless to 
deny, cannot be always avoided. Leaving this to be 
improved upon, I come to the journey proper. 

We, that is Alex, and I, started from West Brompton 
Station at 3.30, and rode through Hammersmith and 
Brentford to Hounslow, which was very fair going, except 
where it had been watered. Before reaching Colnbrook we 
found the road fearfully dusty, but after that good to 
Maidenhead; here we went in for a wash and tea at 
Skindle's. I may mention that our Club ties are not quite 
the thing; I happened to perspire a little, and the tie getting 
damp transferred its colour with a conservative profuseness 
to my linen shirt and collar. 

We got under weigh again at 7.45, and after the ride up 
out of this place, we made capital way over the Bath road 
to Reading, which we reached at 8.41. All this road is 



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doubtless too well known to require any further description 
than its present state, which was extremely dusty. Riding 
through Reading up the High Street, and turning neither 
to the right or left, brought us out on the road to Pang- 
bourne, which village was reached at 9.15, thanks to most 
comfortable roads and no unrideable hill from London. 
When we entered the village we turned to the left, went 
over the bridge and got into tlie "Elephant," where we got 
comfortably lodged and fed, and very moderately charged. 
Distance from London 43^ miles. Being merely bent on a 
lazy excursion, we loitered about the village next morning 
by the river until 12, when the sun, which had previously 
been broiling, became obscured, with every chance of so con- 
tinuing. This decided us. We got into the pigskin, riding 
up and down gradually, and taking in the river scenery, 
which about here is lovely, we came upon Wallingford 
(52 miles). This is a good big village, where I should say 
no difficulty would be found in getting accommodation of 
any kind. We did not dismount here, but went on to 
Shillingford Bridge (54 miles). Here the ** Swan," with its 
garden sloping to the river, proved irresistible, so we dined 
here ; after that, and wine, we found a capital piano, which 
was soon in full swing. In fact, we had quite a musical 
matinee, and we here beg to convey our thanks to those 
two lovely sopranos for their kindly help. However, we 
soon began to realise the fact that we were not making 
much progress (I mean, of course, with the bicycles), and 
started off again through the village to Dorchester (56i). 
Here any member with antiquarian propensities may exa- 
mine the old Abbey ; it is decidedly worth a visit. After 
a call on our friend the schoolmaster, we mounted again 
for the last time, and rode down the Oxford main road, 
which from this place is unmistakable, until just before we 
came to Nuneham, where wo turned off to the right, over 
very loose and bad roads, to Marsh Baldon ; thence over 
more bad roads to our destination, Garsington (63 miles), 
which village is best compared to a volcano. The crater is 
the village, and the lava streams are the approaches in 
every direction, and some of the pieces of pumice stone are 
very large indeed. This was what my " I Zingari " cousin 
would try to ride up. He would have succeeded, but when 
within twenty yards of the top there must have been a re- 
cent eruption, for the accumulation of pumice stone was 
fearful, and thereby caused the first walk up from London. 
From where I turned off at Nuneliam details of our 
ride would be practically useless, unless any member should 
happen to know anybody here, otherwise let him keep 
dear, there is not a thing to be got for miles round. But 
k^p straight on through Nuneham and Iffley and you 
cannot miss Oxford. It is a very good and certainly the 
prettiest way of coming if you are tired of Henley or 
Wycombe. From Nuneham to Oxford 5^ miles. 

B. Ajax, LB.C. 
[We shall be highly pleased to hear more of " Ajax," 
with or without his surgeon. — ^Ed.] 



LONDON BICYCLE CLUB MEETS. 

July 27. 

N.E. District— Im, Bridge Road, at 3.30 p.m., for Ongar. 

N.W. District.— " JAck Straw's Castle," at 4.0 p.m., for 

Elstree. Bathing in the Reservoir. 
W. District. — Kew Green, at 4.0 p.m., for Horseley Towers 

via Leatherhead, return by Ockham. 
S.W. District. — Surbiton Station, at 4.0 p.m., for Dorking. 

Meet S.E. District. 
S.E. District (Croydon Division). — Central Croydon Station, 

at 3.45 p.m., for Dorking. Meet S.W. District. 
S.E, District (BUckheath Division). — Foot of College Park 

Hill, Lewisham, for Sevenoaks. 
August 3. 
N.E. District.— Top of Lea Bridge Road, 3.30 p.m., for 

Harlow. 
N.W. District— " Ja^k Straw's Castle," 4 p.m., for 

Watford. 
W. District.— Keyif Green, 4 p.m., for Amersham via 

Ruislip. 
S. W, District — Surbiton Station, 3.30 p.m., for Dorking. 
S.E. District (Croydon Division). — Central Croydon Station, 

4.30 p.m. for Reigate. Meet B. Division. 
S.E. District (Blackheath Division).— Foot of College Park 

Hill, Lewisham, at 3.30 p.m., for Reigate. Meet 

C. Division. 

August 10. 
N.E. District — Stoke Newiugton Green, 3.30 p.m., for 

Hertford. 
N.W. District.— " Jack Straw's Castle," 3.45 p.m., for 

Hertford. 
W, District— Kew Green, 4 p.m., for Stoke Pogis. 
S.W. 2>w^nc^.— Surbiton Station, 3.30 p.m., for Virginia 

Water, by Chertsey, returning by Staines. 
8.E. District (Croydon Division). — Central Croydon Station, 

4 p.m., for Staines. Meet S.W. District. 
SE. District (Blackheath Division).— Foot of College Park 

Hill, 3.30 p.m., for Farningham. 
August 17. 
N.E. District.— Top of Lea Bridge Road, 3.30 p.m., for 

Waltham Abbey. 
N. W. District.—" Jack Straw's Castle," at 4 p.m., for 

St. Albans. 
W. District — Kew Green, 4 p.m., for St. Albans, via 

Radlett. 
S.W. District — Surbiton Station, 4 p.m., for Walton, 

Byfleet, and Ripley. 
S.E. District (Croydon Division). — Central Croydon Station, 

4 p.m., for Hampton Court. 
S.E' District (Blackheath Division).— Foot of College Park 

Hill, Lewisham, 3.30 p.m., for Shoreham. 

Worthing. — It is with great pleasure that we are able 
to recommend any of our members who may be visiting 
Worthing, to try the Marine Hotel, facing the sea. They 
will be more than satisfied with their welcome, and not dis- 
satisfied with their bill. 



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126 



DOUBLE ACROSTIC. 



1. 



2. 



3. 



A Lydian king for riches famed 
My first discovered, will be named. 
My second is the name of one 
CaUed "merry" always full of fun. 
My third an Isthmus long and wide 
Two mighty oceans doth divide. 

4. My fourth some drive with skill and grace. 
Their horses keeping a smart pace. 

5. My fifth an Eastern city old 
For Arab Sages famed, we're told. 

6. My sixth a climbing, hardy })lant 
Cut off its tail, the rest you want. 

7. Her children slain, she left alone 
Through grief my seventh is turned to stone. 

8. My eighth to most the dearest word 
Our English language doth afford. 

9. A little insect wise, though small 
My ninth industry teaches all. 
My tenth to tell is always best — 
Some say it's often spoke in jest. 
Bicyclists racing at full speed 
To show my next must take good heed. 
If racinff men neglect their laws. 
My twelfth, \rithout a doubt, they'll cause. 

13. My next a name for ladies bright ; 
The loved of Harold thus was night. 

14, My fourteenth is a town ; you'll find 
Its name the Claimant brings to mind. 
At races gay, with ladies by. 
To do my next be sure you try. 
My sixteenth may be often seen 
At Lord's playing upon the green. 
My next is graceful, light and strong : 
As swift as thought it flies along. 
The race is hot, and every eye 
Watches each bicycle rush by ; 

My last the final lap will show. 
And soon the winner you will know. 
[The whole gives the name of a renowned Athlete, and 
chronicles an event in his history.] 



10. 



11. 



12. 



15. 



16. 



17. 



18. 



RACING FIXTURES. 



July 27th.— Joint" Stock Banks' Athletic Club, L.A.C. 
Grounds, Stamford Bridge. 4 miles Bicycle 
Handicap. Entries (2s. 6d.) close July 20th, 
to W. Basan, Hon. Sec, 28, Highbury New 
Park, N. 

July 27th. — ^Brighton Bicycle Club Race Meeting. 

Aug. 10th. — Stanley Bicycle Club, Alexandra Park. 
2 miles Handicap. Entries (2s. 6d.) to be 
made to J. R. Airey, Esq., 14, Bushey 
Place, Camden Road, N.W. Handicapper, 
M. D. Riicker, Jun. 

Aug. 17th.-— Tower Hamlets Bicycle Club Race Meeting 
at Alexandra Palace. 



EXCHANGE LIST. 
(Two Insertt(ms, not exceeding three lines, for Is.) 

58-in. Stassen, front-wheel brake, new last season, price 
£12. — J. F. Marchant, 59, Berners-street, W. 

For Sale, cheap, 56-inch racing "Humber." Address 
Gilbert F. Beck, Chislehurst, Kent. 

For Sale. — 54-inch Stassen, eccentric brake, leg rests, 
bag, oilcan, and spanner. In perfect order. Price, £l2. — 
P. D., 29, South Hill Park. Hampstead. 

For Sale. — 54i-inch Keen's Eclipse Racer. Very little 
used, and in perfect condition. Price, £lO. — C. A. E. 
Pollock, Trinity College, Cambridge. 



To the Editor of the London Bicyde Club Gazette. 
The suggestion I had the honour of submitting to your 
approval in last week's Gazette has found some supporters, 
notwithstanding that rather damaging addition of yours, 
Mr. Editor, therefore I consider myself justified in again 
referring to the subject. You, sir, admit it " sounds very 
enticing," but when you demand such ferociously big pacts 
I must decline the job on the ground that it would take 
weeks to fairly ascertain the merits and disposition of such 

hundreds of restaurant proprietors. 

* « « « « 

But here is a readier plan. Let the Committee insert an 
advertisement in the leading daily papers, say something 
to this effect : — 

"TO CITY TAVERN PROPRIETORS AND OTHERS.— A 
large and influential Club (about 250 members) requires the lease of a 

room of suitable dimenaionB for general Club purposes. Apply to ^ 

stating terms." 

♦ ♦ ♦ <^ ♦ 

Said the North-East Division, 'Twill be a great treaty 
If we ask all the rest to a General Meet ; 
Through Essex they'll have an enjoyable run, 
For the rougher the roads the greater the fun. 

That man ( ! old woman) who wrote to the Globe the 
other day to recount how a bicycle passed over the very 
ground he had quitted a few moments before ought to be 
reminded that it is much easier for a bicyclist to avoid a 
pedestrian than for the pedestrian to try and dodge the 
bicyclist. I have often remarked that shouting and 
whistling, etc., is more likely to lead to a collision than a 
noiseless and watchful approach. Pedestrians, and espe- 
cially pedestrians such as this one, are subject to a species 
of panic when they see a bicycle approaching, forgetting 
that on the bicycle sits a man, and that the man has eyes, 
and the power of guiding his machine. Cactus. 

[We beg to refer " Cactus " to our Committee Notice. — ^Ed.] 



TO CORRESPONDENT. 
OwBK Rob. — ^We much regret that we are compelled by 
wa|^t of space to defer the publication of your letter till 
next week. 



Coogte" 



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BICYCLE OUTFinER, CLUB UNIFORMS, 

AND SUNDRIES. 

PURCHASE 

TOUB 

BICYCLE 



OH 



GOV'S NEW PLAN. 

All the Beit Makei at Mannfaotnrer'B Prices. 
By arrangement with the Mantifactarers orders have the same 
attention as if forwarded direct to the Works, thus saving the buyer 
a deal of trouble. 

IMMEDIATE DELIVERY. 
WriUfor Particulart and Price Lists. 



TRICYCLES for Ladies or Gentlemen. 
YOUTHS' BICYCLE S. 

GOrS CLUB ROOM, 

MOST CENTBALLT BITUATID. 

Offered FREE to Officers of all Clubs to arrange Matches, 
Committee Meetings, ftc. 



GOT.l'^^'^ia^^^Sf^lLondon, B.O. 

THE ALERT BICYCLE FOR 1878. 

The only Bicycle that is fitted with an Adjustable Koller Bearing, ereiy 

roller of which is warranted to tighten equally towards the centre. 

For further particulars apply to the Bianufacturer, 

£• OAIVDBR, Kns-lneer, AI.K1tT IfTOItKS, 

LITTLE GOWBR PLACB, BUSTON ROAD, M.W. 

(One minute's walk from Gower Street Station.)^ 

Biqfdes of cUl kinds Jlepaired <m the shortest notice* 

A BOON TO BICYCLISTS. 

BICYCLE RIDING TAUGHT PERFECTLY 

AT THI 

oxnrsr biottohiE soecool. 

The largest in London. 

Single Lesson, Is. 6d. Perfect Riding eruaranteed, 10s 

Address-GHEQUER YARD, 
OPPOSITE ALDGATE METROPOLITAN STATION. 

ALDGATE HIGH STREET. 

Teacher— Professor T. QUINTON. 

CHAMPION OBNAMEMTAL RIDXB. 

THE EMPRESS 

Is acknowledged as the best Roadster. Strong, durable, and easy run- 
ning. Always gives satisfaction. Strongly recommended by members 
of London Bicycle and other Clubs. 

Sole Agent: T. A. SM ILY, DA ISTOH JTHSUnOV, E. 

THE NORWOOD. 

A newly-designed light Roadster. A very elegant machine. Will 
stand plenty of work. Weight of 52-inch, 40 lb. City Agent : — 

s. 

o 

W. KEEK, Empress Bicycle Works, Norwood Jnnotion, S.E. 
Frice Lists, One Stamp. 



>( 21, LEADENHALL STREET, ) t.^_.^ ^jp 
1 1 54, LIME STREET, / ^^^^' ^^• 



THE BICYCLE OF THE DAY FOR 1878 IS J. STASSEN'S " NONPAREIL" 

The only machine fitted with Screwless Spokes, warranted not to break 
or loosen ; patent eccentric brake easily applied and wonderfully effective ; 
new patent double-coned adjustable steering gear ; best red rubber tyres, 
frictionless bearings, and all latest improvements. Every bicyclist ought 
to possess our Patent Circular-wheel Valise. These machines are made 
for work, and are the best and cheapest machines, as they require no 
repairs and never get out of order, and are strongly recommended by 
Members of the London Bicycle Club, and by all who have used them. 
Weight of machine, from 40 lb. or from 1 lb. per inch. 

City Agent: GOT, 21. Leadenhall Street. 
PBAOS, Pnnoes S treet, Leioerter Sqnare, London, W. 

J. STASSEN & SON, 251. EUSTON ROAD, N.W. 

Factory Entrauci : BEAUMONT PLACE. ' 
Prospectus 1 d., with Photo. 3d. All sizes kept in stock ready for delivery. 

T. A. SMILY, DALSTON JUNCTION, LONDON, 

BICYCLE AGENT. AND 

MANUFACTURER OF THE "TRAVaiER" AND "TOURIST" BICYCLES. 

Specially adai>ted for Travellers (eommercial and others) and Tourists. 

Price lists of these and other Bicycles, post free. 

Photos of "Traveller '* No. 1 Bicycle, and of John Keen, post free on 

appUcation. 

A REAL BOON T O BIC YCLISTS. 

PHIVER'S EXQUISITE MANUS ALBA, 

FOR THE HANDS AND FEET, 

Sent hy Post for 1*. W. in Stamps, by the IfhoUsaU Aaenl, 

J. XA80N, 120. Ooldhawk Boad, Shepherd's Bush, London, W. 

Ag«Bt»-OOY, SI, Lesdenball Street, B.C. ; CROOKS dc CO., 87, Praed Street; 

HILL Sc SON, 4, Haymarket. 

IMPORTANT TO ALL. 
EASBISON'S ANTI.C0BA08IYE PASTE, 

for Preventing Rust, 6d., Is., and Is. 9d. 

HABAISON'S POLISHING POWBEB 

instantly removes Rust and Corrosion from Metals, and for Polishing 

Glass, 6d., Is., and Is. 9d. (see advertisement in "Bicycling Times.") 

Free by post for 8, H, and 24 stamps, of 

SHntTCLXFT k CO., 96, Gddhawk Boad, Shepherds Bush, London. W. 

THE 

GREAT WESTERN BICYCLE DEPOT, 

87, PEAED STREET, 

PADDINGTON, W. 

(Three minutes* walk from Great Western and Praed Street 
JiaUway Stations,) 

Pbopbhtobb : 

CROOKE & CO., 

AOEirrS FOR ALL PIBST-CLASS BICTCLES 
AND TBICTCLES. 



BICYCLES BOUGHT, SOLD, OR EXCHANGED. 

BICYCLES LET ON HIRE. 

Repairs promptly ezeouted by competent Workmen. 

CHAJIGES MODEBATE. 

BICYCLE SUNDRIES OF EVERY DESCRIPTION. 



Price Lists on Application. 

Within three minutes* walk oj Edgware Road, Praed Street 

(Metropolitan), and Great Western Bailway Stations. 
Loudon, 1878. 

Printed for the Proprietors by Dablikg k Son, at the Minerva Steam 
Printing Office, 35, Eastcheap, London, E.C.— July 25, 1878. 



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" Tengage done tous (I Sviter dans leurs ecrits toitte personnalitey toute allusion dipassant Us limites de la discussion la 

plus sincere et la plus eourtoise" — ^Laboulbenb. 



Vol. I. No. 19.] 



Edited by A. OGIER WARD. [Thursday, August 1, 1878. 
CONTENTS. 



Municipal Bye-Laws 127 

Stassen at Home 127 

Brighton Bicycle Club 128 

South of England Meet 129 

Evening nace Meeting 130 

Saturday Runs 181 

RacingNotea 181 



MUNICIPAL BYE-LAWS. 

An account of the fate which hna befallen us may be of 
utility to other members. Last week we were in Winchester, 
and, beinor of the careful class, and always carrying a bell 
by day and lamp by night, we rolled about the hilly old 
city from Monday to Thursday morning without molesta- 
tion. As luck would have it, however, on Thursday after- 
noon, after spending some hours fishing at Twyford, a small 
village about four miles out of Winton, we were returning 
bell-less, having left said in.«trument of premonition at the 
house of a friend. There being no law to compel a fisher- 
man to sound an alarm on approaching his finny prey, and 
not wishing to be a tinkling cymbal to our friends above 
water, we had taken said bell out of our pocket, and half 
forgotten to pick it up again. Friend and selves progressed 
favourably till the middle of High Street was reached, 
when we were sprung upon by an alert custodian of the 
peace. Recollecting that at Easter some of our reckless 
co-members were stopped for not carrying a bell, we ex- 
plained the absence of that useful article, but the energetic 
'' bobby " insisted on names and addresses. We observed that 
he carefully wrote on a scrap of paper, and not in his book, 
and recollecting also that our more wily co-members had 
quenched his zeal in the flowing bowl, we were almost 
tempted to do likewise, but did not. The result is 
that on Monday, the 29th, the same bluebottle 
appeared in town with a summons from the dele- 
gates of Her Gracious Majesty, calling upon us to 
appear in our proper persons at Winton, on Friday, 



Reduction in Price of "Gazette" 131 

London Bicyde Club Meets 132 

Racing Fixtures 132 

Exchange List 182 

Answer to Double Acrostic 133 

Correspondence "":"i^'-_^P^ 



the 2nd proximo, to answer to a charge of infringement of 
a certain bye-law, to wit, etc., etc. Now, seriously speak- 
ing, this is no joke. The constable had three others to 
serve, all returnable the same day ; and we shall certainly 
be put to inconvenience and expense. We have communi- 
cated with a solicitor in the town ; but, though we question 
the power of the magistrates to interfere with an individual 
who lives outside their jurisdiction, in the case of an 
arbitrary though useful bye-law, of which they cannot 
prove rvUful infringement, yet we expect to be mule ted to 
some extent. 

We are very anxious to warn others. Tlie practice of 
carrying bells is one which should be invariable, and though 
we ourselves have been " nabbed " at an unfortunate mo- 
ment, others may be caught who never do carry them, and 
we can only say they will get no sympathy from us. 

Probably some members will be interested to learn the 
result of tlie present proceedings : we shall give full details 
in our next impression. 



STASSEN AT HOME. 

How they can wield 
The mightie frame, how build, unbuUd, oontriye ; 

how gird the sphere 

With centric and eccentric scribbled o'er 
The cifcU , . . 

MiLTOV, Paradite Lost. 

These words of the great Master — ^and may we be for- 
given the conceit that dares to twist their larger meaning 
to our sadly narrower ends — ^haunted our mind as we 



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LONDON BICYCLE CLUB GAZETTE. 



turned aside from the rapid stream of the Easton Road 
into the comparative calm of the little bye-street which has 
obtained, for some inscrutable reason, the title of Beaumont 
Place. Diving to the left down an apparently cellar-wards 
entrance, we are brought up sharply by a dingy door, and 
as the eye is endeavouring to train itself to the half-light, 
and the hand is fumbling for a possible knocker or bell, 
suddenly the door opens, and we find ourselves in the midst 
of a strange congregation of lathes and wheels, boilers and 
bellows, while the rugged and intense features of the man 
before us proclaim to those who know him that J. Stassen 
is at home. 

Some short time back one of our most eminent engineers, 
well known for the sparing sprinkling of praise he was wont 
to bestow even on first-rate work, ordered and received from 
this same Beaumont Place a bicycle. He examined it with 
care, twisted and turned it about, and in many ways sub- 
jected its young frame to strange and unaccustomed tor- 
tures, thus summing up his opinion in the following words : 
" This is good work ; " then, after a pause, " well done." 
Now, it is not within our province to direct, and we have 
no wish to attempt to control, the loves of the bicyclist for 
this or that maker ; the subject would be too dangerous, 
and the lovers would wisely turn a deaf ear to our voice ; 
but we may, so far, in the character of an amateur casual, 
apply the engineer's pithy remark to all the work that came 
under our notice. There was a thoroughness about our 
host which seemed to enter into all that he did, so that we 
feared if the lights went out we might be haunted, not 
by backbones, presses, and anvils, but by strange iron giants 
and gun-metal goblins, all possessed, in some form or another, 
by a weird and uncanny personification of Stassen. 

We are, however, roused from our vain imaginings by 
our guide's attempting to call our attention to the most 
mis-shapen wheel we ever had the honour to behold. 
" Ah," said Euklod, " I am proud of it. It was a man who 
rode on Derby-day ; then there was a coach, with coach- 
man and whip. The whip caught the bicycle ; the man 
escaped, but two wheels of the coach passed over the 
machine. And see," he says, " it is bent, as you say, 
out of all possible shape ; but not a spoke is started — ^not 
one nut is loose." As he uttered these words, he led the way 
past the many-coloured board where buyers pause, doubtful 
as to which of its varied streaks shall be their chosen colour, 
to the recess which may be fairly called the drawing-room 
of the place, where a goodly show of 'cycles of all sizes are 
grouped about — as men and women at a crush, either 
polished or painted, or both — spending a few quiet days 
before facing the up-hills and down-hills of life. We 
noticed a more than usually light machine of this maker's, 
but to our somewhat awkward congratulations on the 
diminished weig&t, he answered, smilingly, that "it was 
a nice thing, good for the level and pretty-surface roads. 
Tou talk of weight; believe me, sir, it is not the weight : 



in the long run, 'tis the man makes all the difference." 
We tried (we are glad to confess to no purpose) to draw 
him out on the question brulante of the comparative merits 
of this and that make ; but he firmly declined any criticism 
of others, merely giving his own quiet opinion that time 
would tell in his favour. 

We should bore our readers were we to inflict upon them 
a detailed description of the forges below in that big 
cellar-like room, where, among fancies of the past, the 
remains of a famous tetracycle (ah, odious word !) quietly 
repose : a four-wheeled construction which was to ha^e been 
the Great Eastern among 'cycles, carrying its four strong 
riders and two fair sitters, six in all. We can but allude 
to that mysterious hospital under the stairs, where broken 
backbones rest and bent treadles wait for their turn of 
straightening at the doctor's hands, or to that still more 
mysterious species of cavern into which Vulcan and liis son 
alone penetrate, to whom alone is said to be fully known the 
secret of the mysterious never-failing spokes. All these 
things, and more than these, we saw, but it was time to 
release our guide. As he opened the door that leads up 
the steps he dismissed us with this parting shot, fired, how- 
ever, so simply that none who heard the report would, we 
believe, have taken offence. " It is to time, as I said, sir, 
to TIME I trust. There is much good in what is light No 
doubt there may be pleasing features in the light 
things. They are, though, you will excuse me, 
sir, but the so-called fleeting fashions of the hour, while 
the Stassen, it endureth for ever. There are three small steps 
and a large one. Ah, take care ; that is right ; good bye." 

In a minute wo were again in the full stream of the Euston 
Road, and turning down by Mrs. Bancroft's charming little 
house soon found ourselves entranced by the exquisite 
acting of " Diplomacy." But that night, strange visions 
haunted our rest ; Bancroft on a gigantic 72-inch was 
racing Stassen on the crooked wheel, while the fascinating 
Countess Zicka was travelling down hill on spokes as 
brilliant and hollow as her own most captivating speeches. 



BRIGHTON BICYCLE CLUB. 
On Saturday last the members of the above Club held 
their third annual race meeting on the County Cricket 
Ground, Hove. An account of the procession which pre- 
ceded the races will be found in another column, and from 
this it appears to have been a grand success. We r^^t 
being unable to record a similar success for the racing part 
of the programme. The arrangements were far from good. 
The path runs close to the extremity of the ground, and 
consequently the centre was occupied by the spectators ; 
they should, however, have been kept there, and not 
allowed to roam all over the place, crossing the path at 
their pleasure, thereby risking their own and the riders' 
lives. There was not a yard of rope at the winning post, 
where we witnessed some narrow escapes, the efforts of one 



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LONDON BICYCLE CLUB GAZETTE. 



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policeman being useless in keeping impetuous schoolboys 
off the track. The course itself, which was once a good 
cinder path, was very rough, nearly all the cinder having 
disappeared from the surface, leaving what closely resem- 
bled a rough chalk road. Between each heat there were 
long tedious pauses, which, however, were occasionally filled 
up by the splendid music of the 5th (Royal Irish) Lancers' 
band, decidedly the most enjoyable portion of the pro- 
gramme. The usual Brighton " large and fashionable 
company " was not at the Cricket Ground, which — seeing 
the extent to which bicycling is carried on at Brighton and 
the interest taken in the sport by the inhabitants — sur- 
prised us not a little. 

The racing itself was only mo<lerate. Mackinnon, who 
was advertised as the amateur champion for 1878, received 
40 yards in the Open Mile and a sound beating from Quirk — 
a severe blow for the Brightonians. He was also beaten off 
a mark by R Moore, in the Two-miles Club Handicap. It 
will be seen that the winners of the tliree prizes in the 
Open Mile repeated their success in tlie Two Miles. 

The following is a return : — 

Onb Mile Handicap (Open). 
Tlie heats were won by H. Tomkins, Blackheath B.C., 80 
yards ; K B. Mackinnon, Brighton B.C., 40 ; £. A. Euntz, 
Pickwick B.C., 70 ; W. Quirk, Kingston B.C., scratch ; and 
A. Tarling, Pickwick B.C., 80. In the final, Runtz, Tar- 
ling, and Tomkins made a good race of it right through, 
and although Quirk rode well and made up a lot of ground 
he failed to ''get nearer than 30 yards from the winner. 
Mackinnon did not finish. Euntz won on the post by one 
yard, Tarling being five yards in front of Tomkins. Time 
2 mins. 59 sees. 

One-Milb Club Handicap. 
H. Moore, scratch, 1st ; W. M. Rayward, 60 yards, 2nd ; 
T.Reeves, 145,3rd. Won by 20 yards. Time, 3 mins. 12 sees. 
John Keen then rode two miles against time, occupying 
6 mins. 28 sees. The spectators were disappointed witli 
the performance, but Keen was afraid to go at his full 
speed on such a track. 

Two-Miles Open Handicap. 

First Heat.— F. W. Green, Maldon B.C., 170 yards, 1st ; 
H. Tomkins, Blackheath B.C., 180, 2nd ; M. B. O'Reilly, 
London B.C., 175, 3rd ; H. Moore, scratch, 0. Won by 
25 yards ; a similar distance between second and third. 
O'Eeilly rode very well, but did not have enough start for 
so young a rider. 

Second Heat. — T. Chambers, Lincoln B.C., 170 yards, 1st ; 
W. Quirk, Kingston B.C., scratch, 2nd; E. Tyler, 
Surrey B.C., 180, 3rd ; T. C. Berrington, T.B.C., 210, ; 
H. D. Thomas, Beckenham B.C., 200, 0. Won by 20 yards, 
90 yards between second and third. Tyler and Berrington 
finished almost together ; Thomas stopped in the fourth 
lap. 



Third Heat.— A. Tarling, 140 yards, 1st ; W. S: Field, 
Tower Hamlets, 215, 2nd. This was a match. Tarling 
took the lead in the 4th lap, and although Field rode very 
gamely, won easily by 20 yards. 

Fourth Heat— E A. Runtz, P.B.C., 130 yards, 1st ; J. 
F. Harris, Dark Blue B.C., 175, 0. Harris fell at the first 
corner, leaving Runtz to finish at his leisure. 

Fifth Heat. — J. W. Sharp, Croydon Ramblers, 215 yards, 
Ist ; 6. A. Simpson, Cotswold Nondescripts, 170, 2nd ; C. 
Ide, Brighton, 175, 0. Won by 100 yards. Ide gave up 
when 150 yards behind. 

Final Heat.— Tarling, 1 ; Runtz, 2 ; Tomkins, 3 ; T. 
Chambers, ; J. W. Sharp, 0. As in the one mile, the 
three first soon went to the fore, and, racing hard, were all 
together a quarter- mile from home. Runtz led round the 
last corner, but Tarling spurting on the outside, shot him 
on the post, and won by 1 yard ; Tomkins 10 yards behind. 

Two Miles Club Handicap. 

H. Moore, scratch, 1st ; R. R. Mackinnon, scratch, 2nd ; 
W. M. Rayward, 130, 3rd. Moore immediately went to the 
front, and although the '' champion " tried all he knew to 
overtake him, he was beaten by 10 yards, Rayward being 
only 3 yards further off. 

The Quarter Mile Slow Race was won by Browne. 
All the others fell. One hundred yards would have been 
quite far enough for this. 

The open races were handicapped by John Keen. 



SOUTH OF ENGLAND MEET. 

In spite of the rain of the previous night, and the very 
greasy state of the roads, four members mustered at the 
Marble Arch at 5.45 a.m. last Saturday, viz., Bacon, Cooke, 
Freeth, and Marcjiant. As one or two others had half 
promised to turn up, the start was delayed until six o'clock, 
when the Club call from Cooke's bugle gave the signal to 
mount. Along Park Lane, over Vauxhall Bridge, and 
down the Brixton Road to Croydon is never very pleasant 
riding, but after a storm of rain it may be termed simply 
execrable, and great was the satisfaction when Croydon was 
reached at 7. 10 (llj miles). Here a dismount was made in 
hopes of gathering some of the S.E. District, but, as no one 
developed in spite of repeated calls, the journey was pro- 
ceeded on at 7.30, and the roads now being almost faultless, 
Horley was easily reached at 8.40 (25^). A hurried meal 
of bread and cheese and milk here refreshed our travellers, 
and it was their intention to ride down to Brigliton as 
quickly as possible in order to get a dip in the sea before 
the Meet. This ,however, was not to be, for, re-mounting at 
9.10, they had scarcely proceeded 100 yards when Buckler 
met them, having ridden over from Dorking for breakfast 
at Crawley, according to a previous half suggestion of 
Bacon's. Of course he was famished, and there was nothing 
for it but to call another halt when Crawley w^ reached at 



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LONDON BICYCLE CLUB GAZETTE. 



LONDON BICYCLE CLUB MEFPS. 
August 3. 

N.E. District— ToT^ of Lea Bridge Road, 3.30 p.m., for 

Harlow. 
N,W. District^" Jack Straw's Castle," 4 p.m., for 

Watford. 
W. District — Kew Green, 4 p.m., for Amersham via 

Ruislip. 
S. W. District — Surbiton Station, 8.80 p.m., for Dorking. 
S.E. District (Croydon Division). — Central Croydon Station, 

4.30 p.m. for Reigate. Meet B. Division. 
S.L\ District (Blackheath Division).— Foot of College Park 

Hill, Lewisham, at 3.30 p.m., for Beigate. Meet 

C. Division. 

August 10. 

N.E, District—Stoke Newiugton Green, 3.30 p.m., for 

Hertford. 
KW. District.— '* Jsick Straw's Castle," 3.45 p.m., for 

Hertford. 
W. District. — Kew Green, 4 p.m., for Stoke Pogis. 
S.W. District. — Surbiton Station, 3.30 p.m., for Virginia 

Water, by Chertsey, returning by Staines. 
S.E. District (Croydon Division). — Central Croydon Station, 

4 p.m., for Staines. Meet S.W. District. 
S.E. District (Blackheath Division).— Foot of College Park 

Hill, 3.30 p.m., for Farningham. 

August 17. 

N.E. District.— To^ of Lea Bridge Road, 3.30 p.m., for 

Waltham Abbey. 
N.W. District— '' Jack Straw's Castle," at 4 p.m., for 

St. Albans. 
' W. District — Kew Green, 4 p.m., for St. Albans, via 

Radlett. 
S.W. District. — Surbiton Station, 4 p.m., for Walton, 

Byfleet, and Ripley. 
S.E. District (Croydon Division). — Central Croydon Station, 

4 p.m., for Hampton Court. 
S.E. District (Blackheath Division).— Foot of College Park 

Hill, Lewisham, 3.30 p.m., for Shoreham. 

August 24. 

N.E. District.— Lea Bridge Road, 3.30 p.m., for Ingate* 

stone. ^ 

N.W. District— '' Jack Straw's Castle," 4 p.m., for 

Essendon. 
W. District — Kew Green, 4 p.m., for Aldenham Abbey. 
S. W. District. — Surbiton Station, 4 p.m., for Reigate. 
S.E. District (Ciroydon Division). — ^Central Croydon Station, 

4.30 p.m., for Reigate. 
S.E. District (Blackheath Division).— Foot of College Park 

Hill, Lewisham, 3.30 p.m., for Reigate. 

Caen. "Hotel St. Barbe." Les membres du cercle 
sont invites descendre i cet hotel ou Ton y trouve un 
bon accueil et des prix moder^. Table d'hdte. Dejeuner 
Fs. 2 50. Diner Fs. 3. 

Granville. '' Lhotel du Nord " est tenu par le mSme 
proprietaire. 



RACING FIXTURES. 

Aug. 10th. — Stanley Bicycle Club, Alexandra Park. 
2 miles Open Handicap. Entries (28. 6d.) 
close August 3rd, fo J. R. Airey, Esq., 14, 
Busby Place, Camden Road, N. Handi- 
capper, M. D. Riicker, Jun. A fortnight's 
practising ticket issued to competitors. 

Aug. 17tb. — ^Tower Hamlets Bicycle Club Race Meeting 
at Alexandra Palace. 

Aug. 24th. — Kingston Bicycle Club. 2 miles Open 
Handicap at Hampton Wick Cricket Grounds 
in Bushey Park; one of the best grass courses 
in England. Handicapper, Mr. M. D. Riicker, 
Jun. Entries (2s. 6d.) close August 15th. 

Aug. 31st. — ^London Athletic Club Bicycle Meeting, 
Stamford Bridge. 1, 3, and 6 miles Open 
Handicaps, and 2 miles Members'. Three 
Prizes in each event. Entrance Fees, 
Strangers 5s., Members 2s. 6d. each event. 
Forms of Entry to be obtained from Mr. 
Wm. Waddell, Hon. Sec, or the Handi- 
capper, Mr. M. D. Riicker. 

EXCHANGE LIST. 
(Ttco Insertions, not exceeding three lines, for Is.) 

For Sale, 52-inch all-bright Goddard, of Brighton. 
Roller bearings, very effective front Y^heel roller brake. 
Cost £24, price f 12,— H. C. Visick, Abercrombie Villa, 
Rosslyn Hill, Hampstead, N.W. 

I shall be glad to exchange a 54-inch Johnson's Mileage 
Indicator for a 56-inch of the same make. — ^W. J. Williams, 
23, Highbury Place, N. 

58-in. Stassen, front-wheel brake, new last season, price 
£12.— J. F. Marchant, 59, Beniers-street, W. 



Shirts fob BicnrcLisrs. — ^Those who like a combination 
of neatness, cleanliness, and respectability without the 
disadvantages of a white linen shirt of the ordinary class, 
will be glad to learn that it is possible to get ''Oxford Mat" 
of a pure white. This material is so absorbent that it is 
unnecessary to wear a jersey, and with the new pattern 
military collar to the Club jacket, it is only necessary to 
carry a spare collar of linen or of the same stuff as the 
shirts, to enable riders to present a neat and conventional 
appearance on reaching their destination. 

BiCYCLB Feat. — ^A few evenings since, Mr. Riicker, 
Captain of the London Bicycle Club, undertook the 
arduous task of riding up the steep part of Church-street 
and over Church-hill, which he accomplished in good style, 
notwithstanding the difficulties of the ascent, which can 
be appreciated only by those who know the locality. The 
feat was performed on the 56in. bicycle generally used by 
Mr. Rucker. This is a feat worthy of imitation by our 
locitl bicyclists, some of whom, it is said, can do it, but we 
have not heard that they have as yet done so. — Sussez 
Daily News. 



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ANSWER TO DOUBLE ACROSTIC. 

1. C roesu S 

2. Andrew 

3. P anam A 

4. TandeM 

5. A lepp 

6. I Vy 

7. N lob E 

8. M othe R 

9. A n T 

10. T nit H 

11. T im E 

12. H avo C 

13. E art H 
U. WaggA 

15. W i N 

16. E leve N 

17. B icycl E 

18. B el L 

^ Captain Matthew Webb swam over the Channel.' 



Correspmtbcita. 

To the Editor qf ths London Bicycle Club Gazette. 

Dear Sir, — I shall be much obliged if you will inquire 
through the Gazette the best road from London to 
Honiton, and the names of any good inns on the road— 
Yours sincerely, 

23, Canonbury Road, N. Thos. Geo. Nevill. 



To the Editor of the London Bicycle Club Gazette. 

Sir, — The idea mentioned by " Facilis Descensus," in a 
late number of the Gazette, re Asphalte Path Co., is not 
such a joke — ^pure and simple — as most of his readers will 
imagine. In the Agricultural Gazette of April 8, in a 
review of " Road Construction," by Kinnear Clark, there 
was a description with detailed illustration of a very similar 
idea. This — ^first brought forward, it seems, by a member 
of the Society of Arts — consists in laying down in roadways 
tu?o asphalte tracks for the wheels (ezclusiyely) of vehicles ; 
in the simplest form of the project the rest of the road is 
left of the original surface. On examination, it seems to 
be an adaptation and refinement on the trams of granite 
members will have seen across most of the London bridges. 
These again were copied from a system long in use in 
Northern Italy. It would be out of place to go much into 
figures, but I may perhaps say that I believe 400 cubic 
yards of asphalte would do a mile handsomely — et apree ! 
One's mouth positively waters at the prospect 

While looking through the above-mentioned book previ- 
ous to reviewing it, I came across a statement that seemed 
to explain the origin of a phrase in constant use among 
bicyclists. I gathered that the London road surveyors 
had a local custom of applying the word " macadam " to 
the granite macadamising used in and around London. 



It seems almost needless to mention that the term is 
equally correctly applied to almost any metalline^ whether 
oolite, flint, trap, quartz, etc., as long ^ it is treated on 
Macadam's system. — Yours truly, Owen Roe, 



To the Editor of the London Bicycle Club Gazette. 
Sir, — I arrived, with another member, at the " King's 
Arms Hotel," Godalming, on Sunday evening at 9 p.m. 
We left the next morning at 7.30 a.m. Wo had four eggs 
and three slices of warmed-up meat between us for tea. 
We had sponge baths, each containing, say, a gallon of 
water. I enclose the bill, without comment : — 
'' King's Arms Hotel," Godalming. 









s. 


d. 


Brandy and Soda 


•• ••• 




1 


8 


Teas, with Meat, etc.. 


.• ••• 




6 





Brandy 


. • ••• 







6 






6 







•• ..• 




I 





Attendance 


•• ... 




I 


6 


Breakfasts 


•• ••• 


• 


3 







19 


8 




Youzs truly, 




S. 


P.S.— Breakfast was a cup 


of tea. 


very little milk^ bread 


and butter. 











To the Editor of the London Bicycle Club Gazette. 

Sir, — The explanation of the increased charges at the 
** White Hart" at Guildford is that the house has recently 
changed hands. When I visited that town a few weeks 
back I tried the "Coach dinner" at the "Angel." I had 
my choice of two sorts of fish, beef, lamb, fowl, ham, tongue, 
cheese, salad, &c., all very good, and the bill, with a pint of 
ale and attendance, came to two and ninepence. 

The wide variations in hotel charges are certainly incom- 
prehensible, and urgently call for further inquiry. I find, 
for example, that at the Saturday Meets this summer I 
have paid fourteen pence and two and eightpence for a plain 
tea without meat. Last Saturday, at the " Red Lion," 
Elstree, six of us were charged half-A-crown each for tea 
without meat, and with uneatable " shop " eggs ; attendance 
extra! To pay such charges is to encourage extortion. 
I think much good might be done if Captains would send 
regularly to the Hotel Sub-Committee a statement of the 
charges made each Saturday ; from these a list of the good 
or of the bad houses might be published in the Gazette, 
say, once in three months. 

Unless something of this sort can be done to check the 
present rising prices, it seems likely that a Saturday run 
wiU soon be an expensive luxury. — ^I am, Sir, yours, &c., 

J. W. L. 

[A most excellent suggestion. We shall be much obliged 
if the District Captains will include in their accounts the 
actual prices of the teas at the various places they 
visit.— Ed.] 



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LONDON BICYCLE CLUB GAZETTE. 



G- O 

BICYCLE OUTFIHER, CLUB UNIFORMS, 

' AND SUNDRIES. 

PU RC H AS E 

TOUR 

BICYCLE 

ox 

GOV'S NEW PLAN. 

All the Best Makes at Manufacturer's Prices. 
By arrangement with the Manufacturers orders have the ssme 
attention as if forwarded direct to the Works, thus saving the buyer 
a deal of trouble. 

IMMEDIATE DELIVERY. 
Wriie for Particulars and Price Lists. 



TRICYCLES for Ladies or Gentlemen. 
YOUTHS' BICYCLE S. 

GOrS CLUB ROOM, 

MOST CENTRALLY SITUATKD. 

Offered FREE to Officers of all Clubs to arrange Matches, 
Committee Meetings, &c. 



THE ALERT BICYCLE FOR 1878. 

Tlie only Bicycle that is fitted with an Adjustable Roller Benring, every 

roller of which is warranted to tighten coually towards the centre. 

For further particulars apply to the Manufacturer, 

E. OA7V»El«, Kns-lneer, AI-KltT IV^OUK*, 

LITTLE GOWER PLACE, HUSTON ROAD, N.W. 

(One minute's walk from Qower Street Station.) 

Bicydes of all hinds Repaired on the shortest notice. 



A BOON TO BICYCLISTS. 

BICYCLE RIDING TAUGHT PERFECTLY 

AT THE 

OIT"Y BIOTTOHiE SOliOOL 

The largest in London. 

Single Lesson, Is. 6d. Perfect Riding firuarmteed, 10s. 

Addrees— CHEQUER YARD, 

OPPOSITE ALDGATE METROPOLITAN STATION* 

aldgate high street. 

Teacher-Professor T. QUINTON. 

CHAMPION ORKAMEMTAL RIDER. 



THE EMPRESS 

Is acknowledged as the best Roadster. Strong, durable, and easy run- 
ning. Always gives satisfaction. Strongly recommended by members 
of London Bicycle and other Clubs. 

Sole Agent: T. A. 8M ILY, DA LSTOIT JUHCTIOH, K 

THE NORWOOD. 

A newly-designed light Roadster. A very elegant machine. Will 
stand plenty of work. Weight of 52-inch, 40 lb. City Agent : - 

ft/ 21, LEADENHALL STREET, 1 r. jC 

g i 54, LIME STREET , / ^^^^' ^'^' 

W. KEES, Empress Bicycle Works, Norwood Jnnotion, S.E. 
Price Lists, One Stamp. 



THE BICYCLE OF THE DAY FOR 1878 IS J. STASSEN'S " NONPAREIL' 

The only machine fitted with Screwless Spokes, warranted not to break 
or loosen ; patent eccentric brake easily applied and wonderfully effective ; 
new patent donble-coned adjustable steering gear ; best red rubber tyres, 
frictionlees bearings, and all latest improvements. Every bicyclist ought 
to possess our Patent Circular-wheel Valise. These machines are made 
for work, and are the best and cheapest machines, as they require no 
repairs and never get out of order, and are strongly recommended by 
Members of the London Bicycle Club, and by all who have used them. 
Weight of machine, from 4U lb. or from 1 lb. per inch. 

City A^ent: GOT, 21. Leadenhall Street. ^ 
PEAXES, Princes Stre et, Leicester Square, London, w. 

d. STASSEN&S01n725L EUSTON ROAD, N.W. 

Factory Entkance : BEAUMONT PLACE. 
Prospectus Id., with Photo. 3d. All sizes kept in stock ready for delivery. 

T. A. SMILY, DALSTON JUNCTION, LONDON, 

BIOTCLB AGBNT, AND 

MANUFACTURER OF THE "TRAVELLER" AND "TOURIST" BICYCLES, 

Specially adapted for Travellers (commercial and others) and Tourists. 

Piice Lists of these and other Bicycles, post free. 

Photos of ** Traveller '* No. 1 Bicycle, and of John Keen, jwst free on 

application. 

A REAL BOON TO BICYCLISTS. 

PHIVER'S EXQUISITE MANUS ALBA, 

FOR THE HANDS AND FEET, 

Sent hy Post for Is. 8d. in Stamps, by the Ifholesale Agent, 

J. HA80N, 120, Goldhawk Bead, Shepherd*! Bush, London, W. 

AgeBU-OOY, 21, Leadcnhall Street. E.G.; CROOK £ & CO., 87. Praed Street: 
HILL Ite SON. 4, Hayinarkct. 

IMPORTANT TO ALL. 
HABBISON'S AKTI-COBEOSIVE PASTE, 

for Preventing Rust, 6d., Is., and Is. 9d. 

HABBISON S POLISHING POWDEB 

instantly removes Rust and Corrosion £rom Metals, and for Polishing 
Glass, 6d., Is., and Is. 9d. (see advertisement in "Bicydiog Times.") 

Free by post for 8, 14, and 2i stamps, of 

8HIBTCLIPF it CO., 66, Goldhawk Boad, Bhepherds Buth, London, W. 

THE 

GREATWESTERN BICYCLE DEPOT, 

87, PRAED STREET, 

PADDINGTON, W. 

(Three minutes' walk from Great Western and Praed Street 

Hailway Stations.) 

Proprietobs : 

CROOKE & CO., 

AOEKTS FOR ALL FIRST-CLASS BIGTCLES 
AND TBIGTGLES. 



BICYCLES BOUGHT, SOLD, OR EXCHANGED. 

BICYCLES LET ON HIRE. 

Repairs promptly executed by competent Workmen. 

CHAHGES MODEBATE. 

BICYCLE SUNDRIES OF EVERY DESCRIPTION. 



Price Lists on Application. 

Within three minutes' walk oj Edgware Poad, Praed Street 

(Metropolitan), and Great Western Kailway Stations. 
London, 1878. 



Printed for the Proprietors by Barliko & Son, at the Minerva Steam 
Printing Office, 35, Eastcheap, London, E.C.— Aug. 1, 1878. 



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" T engage done tons ct foiter dam leurs ecriis toute personnalitfy toute allusion d^passant lee limitee de la dmuseum la 

plus sincire et la plus courtaise" — Laboulbbnb. 



Vol. I. No. 20.] 



Edited by A. OGIER WARD. [Thursday, August 8, 1878. 



CONTENTS. 



Municipal Bye-Laws 184 

Notes on Roads in East Hants 185 

Saturday Runs 136 

Bank Holiday Trip 137 

To Mont St. Michel and back 137 

London Bicycle Club Meets 189 



PAOl 

Racing Fixtures 189 

Exchange List 189 

Acrostics 139 

Correspondence 1^0 

Answers to Correpondents 1^0 



MUNICIPAL BYE-LAWS. 

Oar anticipations of the earnest action of the authorities 
at Winchester has heen fulfilled. The friendly solicitor to 
whose care we entrusted our cause wrote word on Friday 
night that a fine of one shilling, with fifteen shillings and 
eightpence costs, had been inflicted. We have paid the 
money, and bought our experience. Probably we owe the 
nominal character of the fine to the exertions of our friend, 
and, perhaps, to the peculiar circumstances of the case. 
Other members will do well not to risk the same fate ; for, 
to judge by the following letter, which appeared in The 
Standard of the 6th inst., they will come off even worse 
than we did : — 

A HINT TO BICYCLISTS. 
To the Editor of the Standard, 

Sib,— As I have just been compelled to bear an injustice at the 
hands of the officials in power for the city of Winchester, and as my 
position does not enable me to obtain redress, may I beg the favour of 
your powerful influence to make the case pubUc ! 

On the 23rd of July last I was bicyoUng from here to Southampton, 
and en route passed through Winchester. Riding down the High-street, 
a sergeant of poUce beckoned to me, and I at once dismounted. He 
told me there was a bye-law to the effect that no one should ride with- 
out a beU in the precincts of the city. I apologised for not having one, 
and stated that I had ridden from a distance and was not aware of 
such a regulation, and then walked till I was beyond the city. The 
officer took my name, as a matter of form, remarking that I should not 
hear anything more about it, notwithstanding which, and the fact that 
I wrote to the dork to the justices, explaining the case, I have been 
mulcted in the sum of twenty-three shilUngs. 



Surely it is not justice that clerks in my position, who only have one 
holiday a year, should be punished and have their situations prejudiced 
by a stringent bye-law of which they are ignorant. 

I am. Sir, yours respectfully, 

Uxbridge, August 8. T. O. DOBELL. 

With all deference to Mr. Dobell, we are so far from 
sjrmpathfeing with him that we rather rejoice in his dis- 
comfiture. By no means because we are in the same boat, 
but because, according to his own showing, he habitually 
disregarded the feelings of others and did his little to 
prejudice our pastime by riding without a bell. 

Seeing his letter, other towns will no doubt hasten to 
follow the example of Winchester, and we fully anticipate 
a number of convictions. These will do more good than 
all the advice and persuasion of the Bicycle Union, excel- 
lent as it is, and when a few reckless riders have been im- 
prisoned, without the option of a fine, for injuring 
pedestrians by rushing down hill without brakes, a great 
boon will have been conferred on the bicycling community. 

Meanwhile we do think that the executive bodies of 
all Clubs associated with the Bicycle Union ought to pledge 
themselves to insist on their individual members carrying 
out all the rules of the Union respecting conduct on the 
road, under pain of expulsion. A little firmness in the 
Union would soon, we should think, make its rules compul- 
sory upon all its members, and, therefore, upon all Clubs 
whose delegates they are. The effect would be most notice- 
able, for we are sorry to have to record our conviction, 
based upon four years' observation, that, in the matter of 
reckless riding. Club men> when out in company, say four to 



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LONDON BICYCLE CLUB GAZETTE- 



eight, offend far more than unattached men. We do not 
say that this is the case in " Club " runs, but it certainly 
is so in runs of an informal character, ^vhen men may be 
seen simply racing to cut each other down. 



NOTES ON ROADkS IN EAST HANTS. 

Route i. — Petersfield to Winchester, via Langrish and 
Bramdean Bottom, distance 19 miles. Cross the railway 
line, good level road for two miles, then a long ascent to 
Langrish. Descend through the village, bear to the right at 
the fork, and a steep, winding hill, beautifully wooded, 
leads to Bordon House, the road then falls slightly all the 
way to West Meon Hut ; from here to Hockley the road is 
magnificent, and passes Brookwood, all level, it is then 
more or less hilly for three miles, finishing with a long 
descent into Winchester, requiring care. 

N.B. — A cross road shown on the map, from Bordon 
House to Lyss, via Ashford, should be obliterated as un- 
rideable. 

Routed. — Petersfield to Portsmouth, via Butser Hill 
and Hambledon, distance 22 miles. This is a nice 
variation from the main road. After leaving the Butser 
range of hills, turn to the right at the foot of a long run 
down, and the road (somewhat rough) falls for about half 
a mile, then a stiff hill has to be overcome, and Clanfield 
is reached, the first to the left and first to the right must 
be taken, and the road is more or less hilly to the foot of 
Broadhalfpenny Hill, which must be walked by everyone. 
Opposite the small inn called the "Bat and Ballj" the 
celebrated old Hambledon Club foionerly played, which was 
capable of .defeating the All England Eleven on several oc- 
casions. A splendid run may now be enjoyed for nearly 
two miles ; there is, however, a nasty grip about half way 
down, which must be looked out for. Through the village 
of Hambledon the road is good. The Rev. A. C. Hervey, 
who resides here, is a first-class rider, and uses the bicycle 
for all his work, finding it invaluable ; his average riding 
distance per annum is about 5,000 miles. At Hambledon 
the road winds to the left, and there is a long, stiff hill at 
Harefield, and is then undulating through Greentree to 
Waterloo, to which place there is a very stiff ascent ; the 
main road to Portsmouth is then taken over Portsdown 
HiU. 

Petersfield to Chichester, vid Stainbridge, over Harting 
Hills, 15 J miles. — ^To ride this road is quite out of the ques- 
tion, Harting Hills being something to go and look at, but 
not attempt. 

BauteS. — Petersfield to Southampton via Hambledon, 
Boarhunt, Fareham, Titchfield, and Bursledon Bridge, 
about 30 miles. To Hambledon as per Koute 2 ; at Hare* 
field take the right-hand road at the fork, and the road 
undulates to Hipley, when there is a very stiff hill (part of 
Shoot Hill) to ride, followed by a long run down ; at the 
foot keep straight on to Boarhunt. The hill here is un- 



rideable, very long, steep and rough, and extremely dan- 
gerous if riding the opposite way, owing to the sharp turns 
at foot. From the top there is a good run down (with 
care) to Fareham, and a stiff bit into the town to mount 
When in the High Street the road is bumpy and rises all 
the way to the station, before reaching which, turn to the 
left under the line, and, in spite of what the bicycle 
annuals say, the road is splendid but undulating all the 
way. Just before reaching Titchfield take the right band 
at the fork, and there is a good run to Titchfield Abbey ; 
a hill here requires care. The road now rises for about 
half a mile, and turns to the left. From Sarisbury Green 
there is a splendid run down to Bursledon Bridge (toll 2d.), 
and then another hill to ride up, at the bottom of which 
bear to the left. Netley Abbey (well worth seeing) lies 
S.W. of this point. The road keeps very good all the way 
to the floating bridge (toll 3d.). This ferry crosses every 
ten minutes. 

Bmte^ — ^Hythe to Fawley, Beaulieu, etc., 16^ miles. 
From Southampton Quay boats run every hour to Hythe 
(fare 7d.). From Hythe the road ascends for half a mile ; 
bear to the left, and after a sharp descent Butt Ash Hill is 
reached ; very steep and rough. After two more pitches up 
and down the running is splendid. At a fork in the road 
keep to the left, and Fawley (5 J miles) is reached. A dip 
in the salt water may be had here. Fawley to Beaulieu, 
(called Bewly) is another 5j miles across part of the New 
Forest, and two miles of it is loose and rough, with some 
rough pitches. The Beaulieu River and Abbey are very 
interesting. Beaulieu to Hythe (5^ miles) is a really good 
road, a stifiish hill from Beaulieu to hill top ; keep the 
left-hand road through the gate, and to the right after 
crossing the Forest for 1 J miles. I rode this last piece of 
5 J miles in twenty-two minutes on the 44-inch " pony." 

Route 6. — Fareham to Winchester via Wickham, 
Bishop's Waltham, Upham, Lower End, Fisher's Pond, and 
Twyford. 20J miles. Slight descent out of Fareham, 
followed by a rise after leaving the toll-bar, then down hill 
to Upland House ; turn to the right up a long incline, and 
after a couple of sharp dips the road rises to the top of 
Head's Hill, then falls rapidly to Wickham ; bear to the 
left and cross the squatD in the centre of this town, the 
road then goes up a stiffish hill at the right-hand comer, 
and is more or less undulating to Bishop's Waltham, up to 
which there is a long incline. The turning to the station here 
is through a very narrow road, opposite the road by which 
you enter the town ; leave the pond on the right and cross 
the railway, it is then good, with but few hills all the way 
to Fisher's Pond (this cannot be seen from the road, as it is 
hidden by trees), a public house stands, however, at the 
comer of the road. The road then turns to the right, and 
there are no hills worth mentioning all the way to Win- 
chester, except one up and down at Twyford. There is a 
good public bathing shed on the river Itchen, just on the 



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Winchester side of St Cross ; turn to the right down a 
lane, part can be ridden ; bathing permitted all day. 

Baute ft — ^Winchester to Bishop's Waltham via More- 
stead and Owlesbury. 10^ miles. This is part of the old 
Roman road from Winchester to Portchester, and may be 
at once obliterated from the bicyclist's map as unrideable. 
After walking up a terrific hill as high as St. Catherine's, 
I was able [to ride for a mile or so, then came a precipice, 
covered in loose stones, at the foot of this rose another 
awful hill up which I again had to walk, and finally reached 
Owlesbury (pronounced Hustlebury) Downs, with darkness 
setting in. A shepherd, however, for a small gratuity, put 
me in a road which soon brought me (feet over handles) to 
Fisher's Pond, where I took the before-mentioned road 
through Bishop's Waltham home. 



SATURDAY RUNS. 

Owing to the proximity of the Bank Holiday and the 
threatening weather, in addition to the number of men 
now taking their holidays, no run took place in the N.E. 
on Saturday. 

N.W. District. 

July 27th, — I was unfortunately absent from this run 
through temporary illness, and, by some misunderstanding^ 
no report appeared last week. Six members, however, went 
to Elstree, and enjoyed a bathe in the reservoir from a boat. 
At the " Red Lion " they were considerably fleeced, having 
to pay 2s. 8d. for a very meagre tea. Both the inns at this 
place are now impracticable. The Edgeware Road was used 
in going, and the return made by Bamet Gate, all being in 
fair order. Distance, 20 miles. Present: Dalton, Free- 
man, Langmore, N. B. Morris, Newman, Tegetmeier, and a 
visitor. 

August 3rd. — ^At this period of the year Club runs, from 
obvious causes, are generally at the lowest ebb. Those who 
remain to carry out the programme, however, while regret- 
ting, for the Club's sake, the diminished attendance, yet 
individually, perhaps, are apt to derive some grains of com- 
fort from this very cause. The run to Watford, by great 
good fortune, just fitted in between two rather heavy thun- 
derstorms, the previous one not being sufiicient to make 
much mud, and a bright afternoon made things very plea- 
sant. Four members only left Hampstead and proceeded 
by the direct route, Dalton meeting at Colin Deep. At the 
'' Essex Arms " we ordered tea, and, procuring towels, went 
to the bathing place on the Colne, under the railway arches. 
Natative members should make a note of this place. It is 
provided with dressing boxes, diving boards, &c., and is ac- 
cessible at all times. We were much delighted with it, 
although the water was a trifle chilly. F. H. Jessel joined 
us in the water, and afterwards rode from Bushey 
to Stanmore. We had a very good tea, with cold beef, 
&c., at 2'8., and returned as we came, reaching home 



shortly before 10. Distance 26 miles. Present : Alison, 
Butler, Dalton, F. H. Jessel, N. B. Morris, and Tegetmeier. 
Notice. — Mr. Norman B. Morris has very kindly offered 
to take a photograph of the members of the N.W. District. 
Mr. Morris, as many of us are aware, possesses great skill 
in this art, and, having every means at his disposal, has 
produced some very excellent specimens. His reduced 
copy of the last Hampton Court group is really a chef 
(fcauvre. He is very desirous of including as many 
members as possible, and he promises to present a copy to 
everyone who appears. I trust, therefore, that all N.W. 
members who may be at home will present themselves in 
uniform at Oak Hill House, Frognal, Hampstead, at 7 a.m., 
on Tuesday, 13th August, unless it should be wet. 

J. W. Alison, Dist. Capt. 



We have received two versions of the run of the West 
District last Saturday, one signed by the District Captain. 
As they diflfer in every detail, we publish both. 
Westebn District. 

To the best of my knowledge the run to Amersham on 
Saturday was only attended by the District Captain and 
bugler. Potts had promised to call at Kew and bring any 
men who might be at the depdt to meet me at the corner 
of Gunnersbury Lane, as I was detained later in town than 
usual ; if no one showed up at Eew he was to call for me. 
At 5 p.m. I reached the rendezvous, and saw one bicycle 
track, which I imagined to be Potts's ; this I followed to 
Hanwell, thence via Dorman's Wells to Greenford, and 
West End to Ruislip, where it was joined by another. 
Putting on the steam, I ran into my quarry walking up 
the hill at Breakspear, up which my " pony " carried me 
well. The 'cyclists, however, turned out to be two stran- 
gers. As the roads from here were in a bad state, I returned 
via Denham and Uzbridge road, after a nice ride of about 
30 miles. The roads were heavy, but no dust, which was a 
treat. It was lucky I did not go on to Amersham, as I 
was there yesterday, and found that they had two feet of 
water in the town on Saturday ; no bicyclists had stopped 
there on that day. The hill at Rickmansworth is now in a 
fearful state— one side a chalk pudding and the other com- 
pletely washed up, and nothing but loose stones. 

W. A. Smith, District Captain. 

Western District. 
The meet last Saturday was fixed for Amersham, but, 
as there was a strong north-easterly wind blowing ahead, 
it was unanimously resolved to go to Ockham and Ripley. 
The Club run then commenced. At Surbiton, F. M. Wil- 
liams and A. J. Wilkinson were overtaken, and joined in 
the Club run. E. C. Koch started for Maidenhead, but 
broke his machine in the operation close to the fork. He 
was not hurt, so, putting it into a cab, he drove home, and 
reached Maidenhead by other means. Present : C. W. 
Nairn and the other members named. 



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BANK HOLIDAY TRIP. 

Having previously arranged to spend our holiday down 
West, Coleman and self left Surbiton on Saturday last at 
3.15> roads very wet, however they improved as we neared 
Guildford, having the wind at our backs. We rode up the 
Hog's Back to Famham ; from here to Alton the roads were 
perfection, but the long hill out of Chawton was soft towards 
the summit, after this the roads were good to Abresford, 
except at the foot of one hill, where the heavy rain had 
washed away all the sand and left nothing but big stones. 
We spent the night at the " Swan " Hotel, Alresford (46 J 
miles), preferring a sleep in the country air to one in the 
town air of Winchester. We meant to start at 6.30 a.m., 
but, just as we were ready to move, the rain came down in 
torrents, so back we went to bed. However, it cleared a 
little about 8 o'clock, so we started for Winchester, taking 
the lower road, which is the first turning on the right after 
passing through the railway bridge. The surface was 
simply perfection, even after all the rain, and there are 
only two slight hills all the way to Eingsworthy, which is 
two miles from Winchester; here we were forced to 
stop for the rain, so we had breakfast at the " Cart 
and Horses." After a scanty meal we ran through Win- 
chester and Romsey, without any adventure until we 
reached a place called Hartly Lodge, where we had a fine 
pig chevy, three porkers racing us for quite half a mile, 
until we lost sight of them under some thick bushes. We 
ran on with the wind dead against us to Lyndhurst, lunching 
at the "Grown," after having the most delicious cold 
bath in the bathroom of the hotel After lunch we 
started vid Stoney Cross to Ringwood, and we should 
advise anyone on a bicycle not to do it, as the road is all 
loose stones and sandy, in fact for three miles we walked as 
much as we rode, rain pelting down all the time, so we 
should have ridden if possible. Once clear of the forest, 
we had a run down of two miles towards Ringwood ; we 
then took the Salisbury road, but at Fordingbridge the 
rain came on so heavily that we decided to shake down 
somewhere, so went to the "Crown." Distance ridden, 
49 miles. I give our bill, as the hotel was comfortable, and 
as for the charges they should be framed, and it would be 
well for any economical member to jstay here instead of 
being fleeced at Salisbury. Meat teas, Ss. 6d. ; 1| pints 
beer, 6d. ; beds, Is. 6d. ; soda and sandwiches, Is. lOd. 
for early breakfast ; attendance, 6d. ; total, 7s. lOd. Waking 
at 6 a.m. we got up, and, finding the weather looked 
clearing, started at 7 for Salisbury — roads like glue; 
the early sheep were out before us, and in some places had 
made mud pies ; but we, not being Scotchmen, could not 
enjoy the drizzle that accompanied us to Salisbury. We 
left Salisbury after breakfast number two, and found 
the roads over the downs to Middle Wallop very soft and 
sticky ; from thence through Andover to Basingstoke they 
were fanr, but our pace was not great, as the wind was 



against us. At Hustom Priors, 5j^ miles from Andover, 
we had a splendid bathe, the water being deliciously cold, 
though too shallow for a swim. After lunch at Basingstoke 
we started, meaning to run slowly home, but we found the 
surface so lovely that we arrived at the '^ Jolly Farmer," at 
Bagshot, more than half an hour before the time we had 
planned. We then ran on through Staines to Surbiton. 
Distance for the day 86^ miles, or 182 miles in the two and 
a half days. Hardly had we arrived at Surbiton before the 
rain, our old enemy, came down in torrents. So ended a 
most enjoyable trip, barring the weather. 

A H. Koch. 



TO MONT ST. MICHEL AND BACK. 

On Saturday, July 13th, J. W. Potter and I met at 
Waterloo Station, and started for a fortnight's tour, with 
the avowed object of seeing Mont St. Michel. We caught 
the 5.45 p.m. train, and reached Southampton soon after 
eight, without having any adventures. Our first care was 
to stow our machine safely on board the Alice, and to se- 
cure berths. Having done so, we started off to see a large 
fire in the principal street. It turned out to be a ship 
chandler's shop, and was a magnificent sight. The firemen 
evidently found it impossible to put it out, and directed their 
efforts to preventing it from spreading to the next houses. 
We wished a certain member of the S.E. had been with us. 
He would have had a fine opportunity of distinguishing 
himself. We soon got tired of watching the fire, and re- 
turned on board to have some supper. Jack fell in love 
with the moon, and went on deck to look at her, but I pre- 
ferred turning in, and was soon sound asleep. We both 
awoke about six, and, after having a wash, had breakfast 
and went on deck. The sea was perfectly smooth, and we 
both enjoyed the remainder of the passage very much. We 
landed in Havre, and after a slight delay in the douane, 
proceeded to the ''Grand Hotel de Normandie," which I can 
recommend. We employed our time in visiting the prin- 
cipal objects of interest in the town. The Hotel de Ville, 
the Muse^, and the Aquarium are all well worth a visit. 
The English church is in the Boulevard de Strasbourg. We 
caught the 8 a.m. boat the next morning for Trouville, and 
were charged a franc each for our bicycles. We started off 
immediately for Pont TEveque, where we had breakfast at 
the " Hotel du Bras d'Or." The road was level, and rather 
rough. After breakfast we walked about the town, much 
to the astonishment of the market people, for it was market 
day. They could not understand the L.B.C. uniform at all, 
and stared a ^eat deal. We started about twelve for Caen, 
over a hilly road, and on our arrival put up at the " Hotel 
St. Barbe." Our host was most civil and obliging, and gave 
us a great deal of information about the roads, etc., and 
our bill was moderate. We visited the Abbaye des Hommes, 
the Abbaye des Femmesi and St. Etienne, all of which are 
remarkably fine buildings. We found so much to interest us 



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that we did not start the next day till half-past four. The dis- 
tance from Trouville to Caen is 60 kilometres. We had a good 
road, though rather hilly to Villers-Bocage, 26 kilometres, 
where we stopped at the '' Hotel des Trois Roid/' which was 
recommended to us by our host of St. Barbe. We changed 
our clothes and sat down to table d'hdte at 7 p.m. The 
place was only a small village, and yet we had a remarkably 
good dinner, very different to the everlasting chops, or 
ham and eggs of old England. There was nothing to do, 
so after dinner and some coffee we went to bed. The 
manufacturer of our beds evidently made them for men 
about five feet high. We found it quite impossible to He 
straight in them, and were compelled to stretch ourselves 
diagonally from one comer to the opposite one, and even 
then we found them too short. The next day we were up 
at 7 p.m., and after some caf6 au lait left for Vire. The 
road was very hilly, and we did nothing but ascend and des- 
cend the whole way. There is rather a stiff climb into Vire, 
which is paved to make it worse ; however, we managed to 
ride up, to the great astonishment of the natives. We were 
quite ready for our breakfast at the only hotel in the place, 
and so left our machines in the yard to the tender mercies 
of about half the town, who had turned out to inspect 
them. Fortunately they contented themselves with 
touching the india-rubber and crying out " caoutchouc." 
We had a good breakfast, and after having called at the 
Poste Kestante for our letters, we lay down under some 
trees to read them. The heat was intense, so we waited 
till 5 p.m., and then started for Villedieu. After having 
gone down a long steep hill, we found we had taken the 
wrong road. As we did not relish climbing the hill again, we 
went on, and were rewarded for our laziness by having ahill six 
miles long to climb. It seemed as if it were never going to end, 
and we almost despaired of ever reaching the top. We 
heartily sympathised with Mr. Sisyphus, when we at last 
reached the top. We had a long hill to ride down, which is not 
safe to fly, and soon arrived at the " Hotel du Commerce," 
St. Pois, 58 kilometres, rather tired after our mountaineering. 
The hotel windows command one of the loveliest views I 
have ever seen, and we were delighted that we had not 
gone to Villedieu. On Thursday we rose at 7.30, paid our 
hotel bill, which was moderate, and were in the saddle at 8. 
It is chiefly down hill to Breccey, and a give-and-take road 
from there to Avranches (36 kilos). The town is situated 
on the top of a big hill, which is, however, quite rideable. 
We stopped at the " Hotel d'Angleterre," where the land- 
lady recognised the badge and asked me if I was not one 
of the eight who had been there last year. She seemed 
very pleased to see us, and was most attentive. We spent 
Friday visiting Mont St. Michel, 24 kilos from Avranches. 
It is not advisable to ride on the bicycles to the Mount. 
The cab-fare is 15 francs. We had our first bathe there, 
in the river that separates Normandy from Brittany, and 
enjoyed it immensely. Before visiting the monastery we 
had breakfast at the " Hotel St. Michel," which is kept by a 



most attractive hostess. In the visitors' book we saw the 
names of two G.U.B.G. men, one a well-known racer. We 
returned to Avranches in time for dinner, and went for a 
walk in the public gardens before going to bed. 

We left Avranches at 11.30, and rode to Qranville. 
Though it was only 28 kilos, we were so overcome with the 
heat that we were very glad to dismount at the " Hotel 
des Trois Couronnes." Three people had died from sunstroke 
the day before, so we were not surprised that the heat 
affected us. I felt most gratefrd for the grey cover that 
the thoughtfcdness of our committee had provided. It was 
a great protection, but I would suggest that a hook and 
eye should be placed on each side as well as at the back. 
We were sorry to miss Dr. 0. Coleman, L.B.C., who had 
been staying at Granville, and who had only left a few days 
before. We went to the theatre in the evening, and were 
much amused at the way in which the commandant of the 
Port and the officers, one of whom had the Cross of the 
Legion of Honour, sucked peppermint sticks during the 
performance. We stayed in Granville all Sunday, and as 
there is no English church had to content ourselves with 
the Roman Catholic one. The bathing is very good, and 
Jack distinguisW himself in the diving line. Next day 
we rode to Carentan (65 kilometres), via Coutances, where 
I received the Bicycling Times, which Mr. Nairn had 
kindly sent. There is not much to see at Carentan, but 
the " Hotel d'Augleterre " is cheap. From Carentan we rode 
to Bayeuz (about 60 kilometres) and Caen (31 kilometres), 
vid Grandcamp and Port en Bessin, at both of which places 
we stayed the night, but I cannot recommend anyone else 
to do the same, as there is very little to see at either of 
them. At Bayeux we visited the cathedral and tapestry. 
The ^' Hotel de Luxembourg " is cheap and good. From 
Bayeux we rode to Caen, before a gale, and from Caen we 
took the steamer, or rather the steamer took us to Havre. 
I strongly advise no one to go by steamer from Caen to 
Havre ; the sea passage is dreadful. We spent a day in 
Havre, where I met three old friends, and left on Friday 
night for Southampton. From the latter place we rode to 
Ockham, where we stayed till Monday, and then rode home. 
We had a most enjoyable tour of about 350 miles. This 
is, no doubt, a very short distance, but we rode for plea- 
sure, and wherever we found a nice place we stopped for a 
day or two. I should recommend no one to go to France 
without a brake, and not to forget their soap. We carried 
M.I. P. bags, and took a pair of trousers with us to wear 
in the evenings. Conty's " Guide de Normandie " is a first- 
rate one, and gives the prices of the different hotels. 
There is always plenty of salad oil on the dining room 
tables in the hotels, which does very well for lubricating. 
Most of the stationers in the large towns sell maps of the 
departments at 5d. each. We found them very accurate. 
The roads are rather hilly, but splendidly made, and the 
people are very civil, but beware of the dogs. 

F. M. Williams, L.B.C. 



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LONDON BICYCLE CLUB MEETS. 
August 10. 
N.E. District. — Stoke Newington Green, 3.30 p.m., for 
Hertford. 

N.W. District— " Jack Straw's Castle," 3.45 p.m., for 
Hertford. 

W. District.— Kew Green, 4 p.m., for Stoke Pogis. 

S,W. District, — Surbiton Station, 3.30 p.m., for Virginia 

Water, by Chertsey, returning by Staines. 
8.B. District (Croydon Division). — Central Croydon Station, 

4 p.m., for Staines. Meet S.W. District. 
8.E. District (Blackheath Division!— Foot of College Park 

Hill, 3.30 p.m., for Famingham. 
August 17. 
N,E. District.— To]^ of Lea Bridge Road, 3.30 p.m., for 

Waltham Abbey. 
N. W. District.—" Jack Straw's Caatle,'* at 4 p.m., for 

St. Albans. 

W. District. — Kew Green, 4 p.m., for St. Albans, vid 

Radlett. 
S.W. District. — Surbiton Station, 4 p.m., for Walton, 

Byfleet, and Ripley. 
S.E. District (Croydon Division). — Central Croydon Station, 

4 p.m., for Hampton Court. 
S.E. District (Blackheath Division).— Foot of College Park 

Hill, Lewisham, 3.30 p.m., for Shoreham. 
August 24. 
N.E. District— Le2L Bridge Road, 3.30- p.m., for Ingate- 

stone. 
N.W. District— " JsLck Straw's Castle," 4 p.m., for 

Essendon. 
W. District. — Kew Green, 4 p.m., for Aldenham Abbey. 
S.W. District. — Surbiton Station, 4 p.m., for Reigate. 
S.E. District (Croydon Division). — Central Croydon Station, 

4.30 p.m., for Reigate. 
S.E. District (Blackheath Division).— Foot of College Park 

Hill, Lewisham, 3.30 p.m., tor Reigate. 
August 31. 

N.E. District— Tof of Lea Bridge Road, 3.30 p.m., for 

Abridge. 
N.W. District— " Ja^k Straw's Castle," 4 p.m., for 

Ridge. 
W. District. — ^Kew Green, 4 p.m., for Ripley. 
S. W. District. — Surbiton Station, 4.30 p.m., for Ripley. 
S.E. District (Croydon Division). — Central Croydon Station, 

4 p.m. for East Grinstead. 
S.E. District (Blackheath Division).— Foot of College Park 

Hill, Lewisham, at 3.30 p.m., for Sevenoaks. 

Companion fob Tour wantbd. — I have not yet found a 
companion for my tour in France. I intend starting about 
the beginning of September, for a fortnight or three weel^, 
and should like to visit Brittany or Normandy, or the 
Valley of the' Loire ; but am not desirous of seeing any 
particular part, neither am I bound to start on any special 
day. Have ridden abroad twice before and speak French. 
Distances will be very easy. It is needless to tell members 
that roads there are simply perfection and far superior to 
any in England. Any member willing to join me, please 
address N. B. Morris, 80, Old Broad Street, E.C. 



RACING FIXTURES. 

Aug. 10th.— Stanley Bicycle Club, Alexandra Park. 
2 miles Open Handicap. Entries (2s. 6d.) 
close August 3rd, to J. R. Airey, Esq., 14, 
Busby Place, Camden Road, N. Handi- 
capper, M. D. Rucker, Jun. A fortnight's 
practising ticket issued to competitors. 

Aug. 17th.— Tower Hamlete Bicycle Club Race Meeting 
at Alexandra Palace. 

Aug. 24th.— Kingston Bicycle Club. 2 miles Open 
Handicap at Hampton Wick Cricket Grounds 
in Bushey Park ; one of the best grass courses 
in England. Handicapper, Mr. M. D. Rucker, 
Jun. Entries (2s. 6d.) close August 15th. 

Aug. 31st. — ^London Athletic Club Bicycle Meeting, 
Stamford Bridge. 1, 3, and 6 miles Open 
Handicaps, and 2 miles Members'. Three 
Prizes in each event. Entrance Fees, 
Strangers 5s., Members 2s. 6d. each event. 
Forms of Entry to be obtained from Mr. 
Wm. Waddell, Hon. Sec, or the Handi- 
capper, Mr. M. D. Rucker. 

EXCHANGE LIST. 
(Two Insertions, not exceeding three lines, for Is.) 

For Sale, 52-inch all-bright Goddard, of Brighton. 
Roller bearings, very effective front wheel roller brake* 
Cost £24, price f 12.— H. C. Visick, Abercrombie VUla, 
Rosslyn Hill, Hampstead, N.W. 

I shall be glad to exchange a 54-inch Johnson's Mileage 
Indicator for a 56-inch of the same make. — ^W. J. Williams, 
23, Highbury Place, N. 

58-in. Stassen, front-wheel brake, new last season, price 
£12.— J. F. Marchant, 59, Bemers-street, W. 



ACROSTIC. 

1. One of the first of sailors ever known. 
Yet still his landing place is often shown. 

2. A heroine of fiction this, and now behold 

Her woes upon a London stage are nightly told. 

3. If preachers would but learn to use this more, 
Their hearers might not through the sermons snore. 

4. Each year upon the day this was destroyed, 
A queen a dinner of roast goose enjoyed. 

5. A pronoun little used but by a sect. 

Whose women must not be with flowers bedecked. 

6. Now this is easy, guess it if you can, 
'Tis you or I, or any other man. 

7. A gentle maiden this, of ancient lore. 
Whom on his back a wild beast often bore. 

8. A few kind words, a look, a smile, a sigh. 
Welcome when life is bright or trouble nigh. 

The initials give a hero whose bravery none can doubt. 
The finals one who saved his fame from ever dying out. 

A. S. ISTBE. 



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(Each couplet represents the name of a distinguished 
member of the L.B.G.) 

1. My first, in a tight fitting garment, looks bad. 
When folk do my next, it shonld make us feel sad. 

2. My first, when 'tis ripe, is both wholesome and sweet, 
My second a thing which, without legs, hath feet. 

3. If you've ridden for miles with my first in the East, 
My second, with eggs, makes your tea seem a feast. 

4. My first firom the bosom of earth must be brought, 
My second is tliat which Diogenes sought. 

5. My whole should most certainly trustworthy be. 
For he keeps all the plate, and the wine cellar key. 

6. We have seen it in print, so it needs must be true. 
That, apart from my whole, no sweet rose ever grew. 

7. My next, I should think, when the Bath race is done, 
Every member must feel who a medal has won. 

(BjncxtBpmttna. 

To the Editor of the London Bicycle Club Gazette. 

Dbab Snt, — I think it would be very useful if a small 
space were reserved in the Gazette, especially during the 
touring season, for recording the whereabouts of our mem- 
bers. It might be headed ''Members' Movements," and 
run as follows : — 
A. B. has gone to Brighton for three weeks (and his address 

might be added if it were desired). 
C. D. has left for three weeks' tour in Normandy. 
E. F. has returned from his trip to Scotland. 

It would be very little trouble to each member to write 
a note to the Editor before leaving and after his return, 
and it would avoid the annoyance one must feel who, 
wishing to communicate with a friend, receives no reply to 
his letter for a fortnight, and then discovers that the friend 
has been in France or elsewhere. — ^I am, dear Sir, yours 
very truly, 

A. H. 

To the Editor of the London Bicycle Club Gazette. 
Sib, — Having been more or less in training for the last 
eight years, I just send a few lines of my experience. As 
I have only ridden a bicycle a little over two years, and 
that only on the road, my remarks are only on training in 
general, not bicycle training in particular. The great art 
of getting fit is to do it so gradually that it is no strain on 
your constitution. The first thing is to lead a natural life, 
the more natural the better. Eat freely of all things that 
will nourish ; too much meat is apt not to digest in hot 
weather. Keep regular hours ; go to bed early, and above 
all get up early ; take half an hour's quiet walk before 
breakfast ; don't touch spirits of any kind ; don't stint 
yourself in the way of drink at meals, but on no account 
take stray drinks with friends, or even enemies, as they 
spoil the wind sooner than anything else. Eice and fruit 
lA ATnAllAiit in hftt wAA.hhAr aIso nlAnf.v nf lettuce : the 



latter supplies a large quantity of moisture, and is very 
refreshing at the same time. Never try to reduce your 
weight too fast, let it come off by shnple hard work and 
not by artificial means. K on first starting work you find 
your mouth and throat dry in the morning, take a slight 
dose of citrate of magnesia, so as to cool the inside — ^a hot 
mouth cannot exist with the interior works cool. These 
simple general rules have won many prizes on the path and 
river for 

Yours ever grateftil, 

S. Squaai. 

To the Editor of the London Bicycle Club Gazette. 

Deab Snt, — I intend starting at the end of the month 
with another member of the G.U.Bi.G., on a long tour in 
France. I shall be very grateful to anyone who will send 
me information as to roads, hotels, &c. The following is 
our proposed route: Dieppe, Aouen, Evreux, Dreux, 
Ghartres, Orleans, Qien, Nevers, Moulins, Roanne, Lyons, 
Valence, Avignon, Aix, Brignolles, Nice. At Nice we shall 
stay a week, and our intention is to return ma Geneva, 
Dijon, and Paris. How to get from Nice to Oeneva is at 
present a puzzle. I expect we shall be compelled to go a 
very circuitous route, or to take the train for part of the 
journey. I calculate the distance from Dieppe to Nice to 
be 700 miles or thereabout : as we do not intend to make 
a toil of a pleasure, this will probably take about a fort- 
night to accomplish. 

I have obtained maps of the whole route, but I can find 
out very little about the roads beyond Evreux. My chief 
source of information is a book — Itineraire du Boyaume 
de France^ published in 1816 in Paris by H. Langlois. 

If any member of the L.B.G. knows any of the roads we 
are going to take, I hope he will be good enough to send 
me particulars to the above address, unless they are of 
sufficient general interest to be published in the Gazette. 
We shall probably start on August 27th or 28th. 
♦ ♦ * • ♦ 

I regret to say that I cannot ficdrly claim to have done 
the good time for a mile spoken of in the last number of 
the Gazette. In the first place I did not get within thirty 
yards or more of the winner of my heat ; and, secondly, 
the times were taken by a member of the Hovers' Club 
with an ordinary watcL — Yours truly, 

G. A. E. Pollock. 

Trinity GoUoge, Cambridge, August 5. 



ANSWEBS TO GORRESPONDENTS. 

We have received a letter signed " Gactus," which we 
deem advisable to refer to the Gommittee. 

Hampshirb Roads.— Pray go on. 

G. W. Nairn. — ^We much regret it is not in our power 
to insert vour communication. 



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BICYCLE OUTFIHER, CLUB UNIFORMS, 

AND SUNDRIES. 

PURCHASE 

TOUB 

BIC7CLE 



ON 



GOV'S NEW PLAN. 

AU the Best Makes at Mannfftcturer's Prices. 
By arrangement with the Mannfactorers orders have the same 
attention as If forwarded direct to the Works, thus saving the buyer 
a deal of trouble. 

IMMEDIATE DELIVERY. 
WrtU for Farticfdart and Price lAsts, 



TRICYCLES for Ladies or Gentlemen. 
YOUTHS' BICYCLE S. 

GOV'S CLUB ROOM, 

HOST CIBTBALLT SITUATED. 

Offered FREE to Officers of all Clubs to arrange Matches, 
Committee Meetings, &c. 



THE ALERT BICYCLE FOR 1878. 

The only Bi^de that is fitted with an Adjustable Boiler Bearing, every 

roller of which is warranted to tighten eoually towards the centre. 

For further particulars apply to tne Manufacturer, 

B« €»A1i]»SIi, Knrlneert AI^BlftT lirolKKS, 

LITTLE GOWBR PLACE, BUSTON ROAD, N.W. 

(One minute's walk from Gower Street Station.) 

Bieyda oj ott lcmd» Itcpavred on the thartat notice, 

A BOON TO BICYCLISTS- 

BICYCLE RIDING TAUGHT PERFECTLY 

AT THS 

OITTT BIOTOIiE SO]HOOIi 

The largest in London. 

Single Leaaon, Ib. 6d. Perfect Biding gruaranteed, lOs. 

Address— CHEQUER YABD, 
OPPOSITE ALDGATE METROPOLITAN STATION^ 

ALDGATE HIGH STREET. 

TEA0HER-PR0FE880R T. QUINTON. 

GHAMPIOir OBVAlfENTAL BIDIB. 

THE EMPRESS 

Is acknowledged as the best Roadster. Strong, durable, and easy run- 
ning. Always gires satisfaction. Strongly recommended by members 
of London Bicycle and other Clubs. 

Sole Agent: T. A. SM ILY, DA IBTOIT JUVCTIOir, E. 

THE NORWOOD. 

A newly-designed light Roadster. A very elegant machine. Will 
stand plenty of work. Weight of 62-inch, 40 lb. City Agent : — 

g f 21, LEADENHALL STREET, ) r^^^^ ^n 
g i 54, LIME STREET , / ^^^^> •^•^• 

W. EEEV, EmpresiBioyole Works, Norwood Junction, S.E. 
Price Lists, One Stamp, 



THE BICYCLE OF THE DAY FOR 1878 IS J. STASSEN'S " NONPAREIL" 

The only machine fitted with Screwless Spokes, warranted not to break 
or loosen ; patent eccentric brake easily applied and wonderfully effective ; 
new patent double-coned adjustable steering gear ; best red rubber tyres, 
frictionlees bearings, and all latest improvements. Eveiy bicydist ought 
to possess our Patent Circular-wheel Valise. These machiuffl are made 
for work, and are the best and cheapest machines, as they require no 
repairs and never get out of order, and are strongly recommended by 
Members of the London Bicycle Club, and by all who have used them. 
Weight of machine, from 40 lb. or from 1 lb. per inch. 

City Agent: GOT, 21. Leadenhall Street. 
PEAKES, Princes S treet, Leicester Square, London, W. 

J. STAS8EN & SON, 251. EUSTON ROAD, N.W. 

Factobt Emtrahcb : BEAUMONT PLACE. 
Prospectus Id., with Photo. 8d. All sizes kept in stock ready for delivery. 

T. A. SMILY, DALSTON JUNCTION, LONDON, 

BICYCLE AOBMT, AND 

MAHUFACTURER OF THE "TRAVELLER" AND "TOURIST" BICYCLES, 

Specially adaiited for Travellers (commercial and others) and Tourists. 

Price lists of these and other Bicycles, post free. 

Photos of "Traveller " No. 1 Binrole, and of John Keen, post free on 

appuoation> 

A REAL B OON TO B ICYCLISTS. 

PHIVER'S EXQUISITE MANUS ALBA, 

FOR THE HANDS AND FEET, 

Sent hy Poet for le. 8e2. in Stamps, by the \fholteale Agent, 

J.MABOVt 120, Ctoldhawk Boad, Shepherd's Bush, London, W. 

Ageats-OOY, 21, Lesdenhall Street. B.C.; CROOKB dt CO., 87, Pned Street; 

\ HILL & SOW, 4, Haymarket. 

IMPORTANT TO ALL. 
SAEBISOV'S AKTI-COBEOSIVE PASTE, 

for Preventing Rust, 6d., Is., and Is. 9d. 

SAEBISOV'S P0LI8HIVO POWDEB 

instantly removes Bust and Corrosion from Metals, and for Polishing 
GlasB^ 6d., Is., and Is. 9d. (see advertisement in "Bicycling Times.") 

Free by post for 8, 14, and 24 stamps, of 

BHIBTCIirF k CO., 66, Ctoldhawk Boad, Bhcpherds Bush, London, V. 

Tfl[E 

GREAT WESTERN BICYCLE DEPOT, 

87, PBAED STREET, 

PADDINGTON, W. 

(Tliree minutes^ walk from Great Western and Praed Street 
Railway Stations ) 

Pbopbietobb : 

CROOKE & CO., 

AGENTS FOB ALL FIBST-CLASS BICYCLES 
AND TBICYCLE& 



BICYCLES BOUGHT, SOLD, OR EXCHANGED. 

BICYCLES LET ON HIRE. 

Bepairs promptly executed by competent Workmen. 

CHANGES MODERATE. 

BICYCLE SUNDRIES OF EVERY DESCRIPTION. 



Price Lists on Application. 

Within three minutes' walk oj Edgware Road, Praed Street 

(Metropolitan), and Great Western Railway Stations. 
London, 1878. 



Printed for the Proprietors by Dabling & Son, at the Minerva Steam 
Printing Office, S5, Eastcheap, London, £.C.— Aug. 8, 1878. 



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FOR PRIVATE CIRCULATION ONLY. 



M^an&m 




Cl^Ittft 



4lazdt^. 



' T engage done tons d loiter dans leurs ecriis toute personnalite, toute allusion dSpassant les limites de la discussion la 

plus sincere et la plm courtoise" — ^Laboulbenb. 



Vol. I. No. 21.] 



Edited by A. O. WARD & J. S. STOKES. [Thursday, August 15, 1878. 



CONTENTS. 



PAOB 

Bells 141 

PenoxuJ 142 

Evening Bace Meeting 142 

Committee 142 

Ladies* Challenge Prize 142 

AHoUdayRide 148 

Croydon to Plymonth and Falmonth 148 



PAGE 

Notes on Boads in East Hants 144 

Saturday Knns 145 

London Bicycle Club Meets 146 

Exchange List , 146 

Bacing Fixtures 147 

Buried Bicyclists 147 

Correspondence 147 



Mr. J. Scott Stokes has been appointed joint Editor of 
this Gazette with ourselves. Mr. Stokes is at present 
enjoying a well-earned holiday on the "briny," but we 
are quite sure that when he returns to town members will 
speedily recognise that he is anjrthing but " at sea " as far 
as the Gazette is concerned. Mr. Stokes is, it is true, 
only a new member of the Club, but he has had great 
experience in connection with the public Press, and we 
congratulate the Club on their acquisition. 



BELLS. 

We have been kindly famished by Mr. W. A. Smith 
with a copy of the bye-laws in force at Winchester respect- 
ing bicyles, and as there is every prospect that other 
boroughs will speedily institute similar regulations, we 
think it advisable to publish them. 

City op Winchester. 

Bye-laws requiring Bells and Lamps to he attached to 
Bicycles, dkc. 

Whereas it is enacted by the Statute 5 and 6 William 
IV., cap. 76, that it shall be lawful for the Council of any 
borough to make such Bye-laws as to them shall seem meet 
for the good rule and government of the borough, and for 
the prevention and suppression of all such nuisances as are 
not already punishable in a summary manner by virtue of 
any Act in force throughout such borough, and to appoint 
by such Bye-law such fines as they shall deem necessary for 



the prevention and suppression of such offences, provided 
that no fines so to be appointed shall exceed £5. 

Now therefore the Council of the City of Winchester, in 
pursuance of the powers aforesaid, at a meeting duly held 
on the 9th day of November, 1877, at which meeting 
twenty members of the Council (being more than two- 
thirds of the whole number of the Council) were 
present, do hereby make and ordain the following 
Bye-laws, viz: — 

" Eveiy person using or riding upon any bicycle, velocipede, or other 
similar yehicle, in any street or public place within the city, without 
there being attached to such vehicle a beU of such size and in such 
order as to indicate the approach of such vehicle, shall forfeit a sum 
not exceeding 40b." 

** Every person using or riding upon any bioyde, velocipede, or other 
similar vehicle, in any street or public plaoe within the city during the 
period within one hour after sunset and one hour before sunrise, with- 
out a lamp of such iUuminating power, and in such order as to indicate 
the approach of such vehicle, shaU forfeit a sum not exceeding 408." 

The above Bye-laws have been duly confirmed by 
Her Majesty's Principal Secretary of State. 

Walter Bailey, Town Clerk. 

VERT IMPORTANT. 

Mr. Coleman informs us that in ten days the same law 
comes in force at Kingston. 

Under these circumstances we beg members to give 
timely warning to others through these columns of similar 
decrees in other places. 



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LONDON BICYCLE CLUB GAZETTE. 



PERSONAL. 

Several members have called my attention to the follow- 
ing paragraph, which appeared in the Bicycle Journal : — 
MISTAKEN IDENTITY AT WINCHESTER. 

Cases of interest to bicyclists were heard to-day before the Mayor 
(Mr. J. T. Clifton), Alderman Sudden, and Captain Moore, sitting in 
petty sessions at the GuildhalL The defendants, Messrs. Herbert 
Sous Mathews, of 62, Belsize-road, South Hampstead; Allen Ogier 
Ward, of 123, Bishopsgate-street, London; Frederick Dobell, of 1, 
Havelock-terrace,Belmont-road,nxbridge ; and Captain Henry Edwards, 
of Mill-hill, Middlesex, editor of the London Bicycle Journal, were 
summoned by Mr. Walter Bailey, Clerk to the Urban Sanitary Autho- 
rity, with infringements of the bye-laws of the city in riding bicycles 
through streets of the city to which no bell was attached, as a warning 
to their approach to passengers. Defendants did not appear, but 
letters explanatory of their conduct had been received by the Bench* 
A fine of Is. was imposed in each case, while Mr. Dobell's costs 
amounted to 22s., and the other defendants to 15s. 8d. each. — Daily 
Chronicle and others. 

[Captain Henry Edwards m not, and n>ever has been in any way con- 
nected with this Journal. Somebody has told a lie. Mr. Allen Ogier 
Ward, editor of the London Bicycle Club Qasette, has possibly got 
mixed up with Capt. H. Edwards, who might surely— just for the sake 
of society, you know— have the lie contradicted and save us the 
trouble, — Ed.] 

The refined malice of some unknown reporter is most 
exasperating. It is well known that '' for ten who see a 
libel only one sees the refutation," but I hope members will 
be satisfied that I have done all in my power to mitigate 
the slander by the following reply to the Editor of the 
Bicycle Journal : — 

Sib, — ^An extract from your paper has been sent me by one of the 
members of the L.B.C. It is headed "Mistaken Identity at Win- 
chester," and I see that Captain Edwards has been described as Editor 
of the London Bicycle Journal, and that yon suggest some confusion 
may have occurred o^ging to my being Editor of the London BicycU 
Club GazeUe. 

In justice to Captain Edwards, who is a friend of mine, and to 
myself, I must tmk space to express our extreme annoyance at the 
blunder, and our regret that we cannot punish the author of such an 
odious falsehood— Yours, etc. A. OGIER WABD. 



EVENING RACE MEETING. 

The Sub-Committee find that the expenses of this meet- 
ing will be heavier than was at first anticipated, and in 
order to ensure success, and a repetition of such gatherings, 
it will be necessary for each individual member to use kis 
best endeavours to secure a large attendance. The Com- 
mittee has given to members every possible privilege. 
They are admitted to witness the sports, accompanied by 
as many ladies as they choose, free of expense, and in re- 
turn they should exert themselves to bring friends, whose 
shillings will help to defray expenses. 

Bacing members who have not already entered (and 
there are a large proportion) should do so at once. The 
limit of fifty is not yet reached. 

Badges are not transferable, members only being ad- 
mitted with them. M. D. ROokeb, Junr., 

Captain and Hon. Sec. of Racing Committee. 



COMMITTER 

At the meeting of the Committee, held on the 12th inst., 
the following gentlemen were elected members : — 

Proposer. 
Whl J. MuUer. 



Name and Addreot. 

Dymoke, Henry Gilmour, 
90, Inverness Terrace. 

BeU, Gko. Arthur, 2 St. 
Ann's Boad, S.W 



C. W. Emson. 



H. Wilson. 



F. J. Wilkinaon. 



The resignation of Mr. T. L. Barton was accepted . 

Letters were read from Mr. Emson complaining of the 
action of the Committee in deferring the election of Mr. 
Bell, who had been proposed by him, and the captain was 
directed to reply. 

Evening Race MEETiNa. 

The actions of the Sub-Committee elected to carry out 
the arrangements of the above meeting were approved and 
confirmed. 

The Gazette. 

At the request of Mr. Ward, it was proposed by Mr. 
TroUope, seconded by Mr. Coleman, and unanimously 
resolved, that Mr. J. Scott Stokes be appointed co-Editor of 
the London Bicycle Club Gazette with Mr. A. Ogier Ward. 

100 Miles Road Medal Trial. 

Mr. Ward submitted a design for a certificate to be 
presented yearly to all members completing the distance 
within the specified time of ten hours. Some slight altera- 
tions were deemed necessary, and authority was given to 
get 100 printed without delay. Those who have won 
medals can also have certificates, if desired. Early appli- 
cation should be made to the Hon. Sec. 

M. D. RucKEB, Jun., Captain. 



LADIES' CHALLENGE PRIZE, 

A fortnight ago a very gracious proposal was made by a 
lady to establish, in conjunction with others, a Ladies' 
Challenge Prize for the L.B.C. Members, what are you all 
about ? Why don't you get your sisters to assist ? We 
are convinced that the fault lies with you, and not with 
your sisters. It ia true that the prize would not appear 
till next year, but the time before us is a decided advan- 
tage. A challenge prize requires money, and should be 
specially made, and the subscription list will necessarily 
remain open -some time, but, for that very reason, members 
should ezert themselves at once. 

Most of our racing members are " domestic animals," but 
they can't expect all their sisters to be as enthusiastic as 
A. L. 0. B. 

We expect, as a matter of course, to find subscriptions 
come in fast If members won't take the trouble to write 



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LONDON BICYCLE CLUB GAZETTE. 



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for their paper, they surely are not too lazy to ask their 
sisters to subscribe to such an object. 

Communications should be addressed to A. L. 0. B., care 
of W. T. Thorn, Junr., 11, Ladbroke Square, W., but we 
will gladly take charge of any subscriptions, if not oonve- 
nient to write as above. 



A HOLIDAY RIDE. 



To anyone desiring a judicious combination of business 
with pleasure, I would suggest send your friends to the 
sea-side. Make them take the conventional furnished 
apartments, and then — things being pleasantly arranged 
for your reception — ride down comfortably yourself and 
join them, and thus will the anticipation of pleasure to 
come augment your happiness, and quicken your flagging 
energies as the miles get longer. Having recently tested 
what I recommend I can advise. Worthing was the spot 
selected, and though desponding friends hinted that the 
town was uninhabitable by reason of its manifold odours, 
and that its coasts were strewn with decaying seaweed, the 
noxious fumes from which could be concealed only by 
deluges of carboliQ acid, thus replacing one smell by 
another still worse, still we boldly held our course, and 
my friends being duly installed, I left Lewisham at 3 p.m. 
two Saturdays ago, and soon made Reigate. Here I 
stopped and enjoyed a frugal and solitary tea at the 
" Grapes," the monotony of which was relieved only by 
the evolutions of an ill-balanced and unfastened table, 
which took its weird pleasure in occasionally casting tea 
things and platters into my lap. Thence I rode through 
Crawley and Horsham. Being now in Sussex I .began to 
look for the South Downs, which soon hove in sight, and 
were visible at least 10 miles before they were reached. As 
night was approaching I made tracks and ran into a small 
village rejoicing in the not cacophonous name of Washing- 
ton Bostall. Why so big a name should be given to so 
small a place I failed to ascertain. Shortly beyond 
Horsham I met several L.B.C. men returning from the 
general meet at Brighton. The climb over the Downs is 
gradual and rideable. From the summit a pleasant run of 
five miles brings one to Worthing. This I reached at 
9.30, having been six hours in the saddle over what my 
mile gauge told me was 58 miles. Here a warm welcome 
and good supper soon caused me to forget the toils and 
perils of the road. 

Ashley Baiueustt. 

It will be remembered that P. Coleman and M. D. Rticker 
attempted to ride to Bath and back in 24 hours, but failed, 
owing to the smash-up of the latter. Coleman's laurels, 
therefore, need no dusting; but his latest feat is ''a hot 
'un." He has just ridden from Hayling Island to Kingston 
(a distance of 59} mOes) in a little over five hours, without 
a single dismount even to oil up. 



CROYDON TO PLYMOUTH AND FALMOUTH. 

Being desirous of visiting some of our friends in the 
west of England, without the use of the locomotive, we 
determined to spend a portion of our holiday in riding to 
the above-named places, though we hardly anticipated, from 
all we could learn as to the roads in Dorset, Devon, and 
Cornwall, that it would be a very easy journey. Taking 
the route given in the Bicycle AnniMl (p. 73) as our guide, 
we started from Croydon on the Saturday evening, and 
riding along the well-known Kingston and Bagshot road, 
we arrived at Basingstoke (50 miles) at 9 o'clock, after a 
very enjoyable, though in some parts a very dusty ride. 
We managed to ride all the hills with comparative ease, 
Egham Hill being the most difficult. Having resolved not 
to ride on the Sunday, we spent the day of rest in an 
orthodox manner; though in Basingstoke it would be a 
difficult thing to do anything else, the lions of the place 
being few and far between and not very easily recognisable. 
We found the " Red Lion " very comfortable. We started 
on Monday morning, hoping to reach Dorchester that 
evening, but after passing through Andover the hills 
became more objectionable in character, and before reaching 
Salisbury, to make matters worse, a very heavy thunder- 
storm which had been threatening all the morning, 
gave vent to its feelings, and forced us to put up 
for nearly two hours in a shepherd's hut, which was 
fortunately near at hand, as we appeared to be some miles 
frx)m any habitable dwelling. After the storm we pushed 
on to Salisbury, over very heavy roads, and whilst having 
dinner at the " Red Lion " were visited by another drench- 
ing shower, which delayed us till four o'clock. Owing to 
these untoward circumstances we could not get farther than 
Blandford (108), which we reached wet through, after losing 
our way and having to wheel our machines over a ploughed 
field, a proceeding which quite effaced any traces of bright 
steel, mud being the principal object in their appearance. 
After a pleasant evening at the " Crown Hotel " we started 
on Tuesday morning in a drenching rain, determined to 
reach Honiton that night, and after riding a few miles the 
weather improved, so that we reached Dorchester in good 
time, and rode on to Bridport to dinner, the roads all the 
way being fearfully hilly, but of excellent surface. A.fter 
leaving Bridport the hills became worse than ever, and we 
were compelled to walk some miles between that place and 
Charmouth, a thick mist which prevented us seeing twenty 
3rards before us adding a good deal to the excitement and 
wetting us through. After Axminster the road becomes a 
trifle better, one or two hills, however, necessitating a long 
walk through the mud and mist. We reached Honiton (161) 
in time for supper, and found the streets filled with all kinds 
of amusements, in anticipation of the annual fair, which com- 
menced on the morrow. Fairly comfortable quarters at the 
*' White Hart." Wednesday morning brought more rain, 
which made the roads very bad going to Exeter. ^Ailthough 



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LONDON BICYCLE CLUB GAZETTE. 



there are not many unrideable hills, those that are proved 
very stiflF, and, to add to our discomfort, we were continually 
meeting cattle of all kinds and numberless vehicles hasten- 
ing to the fair. After stopping a short time in Exeter, we 
commenced the long three miles climb to the top of Haldon 
Hill, the view from which is superb. Then the road was 
all down hill to Chudleigh, where we dined. After leaving 
this town (or village) it became very hilly again, and 
although the surface was beautiful we could not progress 
very rapidly. Passing through Ashburton, Brent, and Ivy 
Bridge — all very undulating roads — ^we reached Pljrmouth 
(221), the last 10 miles into the latter place being very bad 
going, although fairly level, the roads being macadamised 
and fearfully rough and bumpy. Having spent the rest of 
the week with our friends in the most enjoyable fashion, we 
started on the following Monday for Falmouth. The first 
18 miles to Liskeard is very good, being fairly level and a 
really splendid surface — ^a remark that applies to all the 
Cornish roads in that neighbourhood. From Liskeard to 
Lostwithiel is very hilly, most of the towns and villages 
being situated in deep valleys, which render the approach 
to them and the departure from them almost equally diffi- 
cult. From all accounts we should certainly prefer the road 
through Bodmin, which local bicyclists always take going 
from Falmouth to Pljrmouth and vice versa, and of which 
they speak in the highest terms as being smooth and level to 
near Truro. The advice of the Bicycle Annual is evidently 
not sound in this case, as they say the Lostwithiel road is 
the best of the Cornish main roads. After leaving Lost- 
withiel the hills continue, without much intermission, right 
through to St. Austell and Truro, one decline near StBlazey 
being fearfully steep and winding. From Truro to Falmouth 
is a very enjoyable ride, with only one hill to trouble 
you much, and if we had only taken the advice of an old 
Liskeardian, as to the Bodinin road, instead of the Bicycle 
Anntcal, the day's ride would have been a comparatively 
easy one, the hardest part being from Lostwithiel to Truro. 
We reached Falmouth (285 miles), however, in good time, 
and after a stay of three days with friends, trained it back 
to Plymouth, where, after a few days' enjoyment, we 
returned to Croydon by the same means. The charge for 
the bicycles was 3s. from Falmouth to Plymouth, and only 
3s. 6d. from thence to Paddington. On the whole, the 
ride was a most enjoyable one, despite the bad weather we 
had, and though, after leaving Dorchester, a mile of level 
road is never seen, the surface all through is good. We 
rode our trusty " Stassens " (54 and 50), which of course 
gave every satisfaction. Wm. & T. Johns. 

The Treasurer, Mr. Francis Godlee, writes word that he 
hopes to be away from town from the 20th inst. for two or 
three weeks. Members whose consciences may smite them 
for being in arrear need not hesitate, however, on this 
account, to forward their subscriptions, though they may 
remain unacknowledged for a week or so. 



NOTES ON ROADS IN EAST HANTS. 

Boute 7.— Winchfield to Fareham, vid Odiham, South 
Wamborough, Alton, Farringdon, and Filmer Hill (about 
40 miles). Winchfield Station to Odiham ; this road is 
splendid and undulating, but, after leaving Odiham, the 
centre of three roads must be taken up a very steep, chalky 
hill ; this is followed by two sharp descents, followed by a 
piece of road, level at first, which soon deteriorates, especially 
up the long grind to Wamborough ; then there is a magni- 
ficent run down by " Golden Pot," and the left-hand road 
brings you to Alton (12 miles) ; turn sharp to right, and 
again to the right, and on reaching Chawton, the left hand 
of the two roads must be taken ; for a mile or so the sur- 
face is always a bit rough, but it soon improves, and is 
splendid all the way from Farringdon. At East Tisted it 
begins gradually to rise, and this continues all the way by 
Basing Lodge to the top of Filmer Hill. About fifty years 
ago the coach road ran right over the top of this hill, but 
the descent was so dangerous that, after innumerable acci- 
dents, the present cutting was made. It is now a splendid 
run down with a good brake. From " The Hut " Route 1 
to Winchester may be taken up ; it is much more pleasant 
than the direct road through Alresford. A long hill with 
good surface has to be ridden up, and West Meon Hill re- 
quires care, from two sharp turns at the bottom, in the 
village. The road now winds to the right, and, running 
through a nice avenue of trees, brings one to Wamford. 
After passing the toll bar, the left-hand road leads to 
Meonstoke ; here keep to the right, and a very sharp, steep 
rise occurs just before reaching Drozford. The hill into the 
village is now dangerously loose ; there is a corresponding 
rise the other side, and, taking the left-hand road, there is 
a fine run down for a mile, and the road to St. Clair's is 
like a racing path all the way to Wickham, from which 
place Route 5 to Fareham, vid Hoad s Hill, is taken. 
N,B. — Neither Filmer Hill nor West Meon should be flown 
without a good brake, as the pace attained is tremendous, 
and wagons are often in the way both at " The Hut " and 
West Meon. 

Boute 8. — ^Droxford to Wickham, by the old road vid 
Swanmore, 6 miles. This, the old coach road, bears to the 
right at the top of the hiU out of Droxford, and a very 
severe hill has to be ridden, or more often walked. Through 
charming scenery it is carried right up to the top of the 
downs, and just at the highest point there is a very steep 
rough little bit called Barfoot's Hill ; after this it is mostly 
down hill. At a large farm-house there are two roads; 
keep to the left, and a nice run dovmi to Swanmore may be 
had. The road now crosses what was once Waltham Chase, 
and a tremendous hill palled Sheer HiU (locally Gravel HiU) 
rises in front. I rode this after a struggle, but bent both 
my treadles by the pressure required. The road then goes 
straight until it joins the direct route from Wickham to 
Winchester, via Bishop's Waltham. There is another way 



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LONDON BICYCLE CLUB GAZETTE. 



145 



by taking the first turn to the left after leaving Sheer Hill, 
and a good surface, with one or two sharp pitches and a 
torn to the right, also brings you to Wickham. 

Rmts ^.—Wickham to Bishop's Waltham, f>id Miosling- 
ford, 7 miles. Take the direct road to Alton for two and 
a half miles; after passing a public-house called the 
'' Roebuck " on the left, take the left-hand road, and keep 
to the right over the hatch, and up a long, easy rise, which 
leads to a wood (at this place I have more than once seen 
specimens of the large green woodpecker or yaffal) ; it is 
then up and down for another mile, and this is followed by 
a splendid run down ; bearing to the left, and after passing 
some farm-houses, a large mill is seen, with mill pond on 
the right, after which there is a stifif rise to Bishop's 
Waltham. 

Bimte 10. — Cross roads to Portsmouth via Soberton, 
New Town, Shoot Hill, and Southwick. 12^ miles. Turn 
out of the direct road from Drozford to Wickham (Route 
7) at St. Clair's Farm, and beware of a sudden precipitous 
descent to the water meadows, very rough as a rule ; after 
a short rise, bear to the right, and Horn's Hill will have to 
be walked up. At the top'of the hill is a fine level spin 
through what is called the forest (part of the old Forest of 
Bere). At the '' Bold Forester" turn to the left and New 
Town ia reached (a straggling village). There is then a 
long fall, with good surface, followed by a regular caution 
of a hill, as nearly upright as possible, called Shoot Hill 
(this I cannot ride), but one can mount at the top, and 
then it rises again stiffly for about 500 yards ; take the left 
road and a narrow winding lane falls all the way to South- 
wick. Here turn to the left to the church, and then down 
a rough slope to the right. On the left hand is Southwick 
Priory, and keeping the wall of the park on your left, some 
very pretty scenery is seen, and then comes a long bad hill 
to the top of Portsdown ; the side leading to Cosham should 
not be ridden without a first-class braka Cosham to 
Portsmouth, of course, by the direct route. 

BauU ii.— East Tisted to Petersfield wa Stonor HilL 
7 miles. Cross the railway, and half a mile on the right a 
road is taken which shortly forks ; bear to the left, and a 
little more than a mile brings one to Steep, it is then 
against the collar for about two miles, just beyond which the 
descent of Stonor Hill commences ; the road is then carried 
along the side of the hill, and seems to hang over the valley 
beneath ; a more charming piece of scenery would be difficult 
to find ; about four miles of up and down with nothing 
very stiff leads to a long down hill, sometimes rough, at 
the foot of which is East Tisted Ciommon. N.B. — Stonor 
Hill is worth going out of the road to Portsmouth on pur- 
pose to see. 

Will any strong riding member of the L.B.C., whose time 
is disengaged, join me in long-day rides, starting from 
this district, where I am now residing? Address O'B. 
Pitferrane, Grove Park, Chiswick, W. 



SATURDAY RUNS. 
N.W. District. 
August 10th.— This was about as unfavourable a day 
for bicycling as could well be, rain having fiEJlen persistently 
firom 7 a.m. until about 3 p.m., when it ceased and allowed 
the run to Hertford to be performed without a soaking. 
The road was mostly very heavy, and, between Essenden 
and Hertford, in a perfectly frightful state, much of it 
having evidently served recently as the bed of the adjacent 
river Lea. I left Hampstead alone, and was overtaken by 
Morris at Moss Hall, Finchley, Richardson and Tegetmeier 
joining at Tally Ho. At eight miles firom Hertford, Morris 
and Richardson ran on to have a bathe, while the other 
two, who were both " out of sorts," plodded on and ordered 
tea at the " Plough." The bathers presently came in 
with the news that McCullum had arrived, and was at 
that moment disporting himself in the water. The occi- 
dental here soon appeared, explaining that, as it was not 
possible to have a meet in bis own district, he had con- 
ceived the idea of joining us. His devotion and, indeed, 
our own, merited a better reward than that which awaited 
us. Before we had finished tea it began to rain, with every 
appearance of setting in for the night. We started to 
return, however, but had not got a mile when such a deluge 
came down as to necessitate a precipitate retreat under 
cover. It now became a very serious question as to how 
we were to reach home, the roads being covered with water 
and there being rather too much lightning to be altogether 
safe. We eventually came back into the town, and Smith 
took the 9.45 O.E. up to London. Richardson had pre- 
viously gone up by G. N. Railway. Morris and Tegetmeier, 
after much vacillation, went home by road, as it cleared soon 
after nine and became a fine night overhead. The other 
member, hf adopting the more comfortable course of 
staying the night, enjoyed a beautiful ride up in. the 
morning. J. W. Alison, Dist Capt. 

Wbstern Distriot. 

I was again unable to leave town sufficiently early to 
get to Eew by 4 p.m. ; and as I did not wish to ride by 
myself all the afternoon I followed the N.W. Division to 
Hertford, riding via Willesden, Neasden, Hendon, Finchley, 
Barnet, Potter's Bar, and Essenden, and arrived at Hert- 
ford at 6.40 p.m., having been 2 hours 12 minutes riding 
firom Acton without a dismount until within one mile of 
Hertford. The storm delayed us, and I left the N.W. 
men, and when it cleared up returned by train to Ware, 
reaching Acton at 2 a.m. 

The run next Saturday will be via Harrow Weald, 
Bentley Priory, Codicote, Aldenham, and Radlett, towards 
St. Albans ; but it is questionable if the distance firom 
Kew to St. Albans will not be too far, as the roads are in 

places very heavy. 

W. A. Smith, District Captam. 



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S.W. DlSTBIOT. 

Augugt 10th. — ^This seems to have been a blank day. 
One member, detained in town too late to pick up either 
the S.W. or W. (the latter having ^bropped the conYenient 
habit of publishing their route), rode to Staines in the 
evening, hoping to ride back with the combined S.W. and 
S.E., but neither could be heard of. During the return a 
refractory team was encountered, and a collision avoided 
only by a rapid dismount. The wagoner " delivered his 
soul " freely until pulled up short by a threat to summon 
him for riding without reins, and without having his horses 
under control This was a trump card ! The Hounslow 
and Staines road was for once in decent condition, except 
the usual loose patches near Ashford comer. 

H. J. 



S.E. DisTEiCT— Ceoydon DnnsioK. 

The rain that commenced falling about 1.30, and lasted 
until afber the hour of starting, naturally made the number 
of members present very small indeed. As the rain had even 
then not quite discontinued, the start was postponed for a 
time. Bacon taking the opportunity to get a warm bath and 
a sleep at the " King's Arms " (he having reached Croydon 
wringing wet from Canterbury). It was also decided to 
have tea before starting, so that it was 6.45 before a mount 
was actually effected. By this time the sun was shining 
brilliantly, and the run through Carshalton and Ewell to 
Kingston was much enjoyed. As the hour was now rather 
advanced — and there was no longer any chance of meeting 
the S.W. District — and as moreover the appearance of the 
sky was very threatening, it was resolved not to continue 
the journey to Staines. The District, therefore, turned off 
and rode to Belsize Road, Hampstead, where Bacon lives — 
he being the only member present. Distance 29 miles. 



Wednesday Run— Westeen Division. 

Five men turned up at GKinnersbury Lane at 7.15 on 
Wednesday, and the route was taken vid Little Ealing to 
Hanwell, where a tremendous ertorm drove us all to shelter, 
and tracks were made for home when it cleared* Present : 
W. A. Smith, E. A. Scott, and W. W. Northcott ; W. 
Arrowsmith and C. Holder, visitors. 

W. A. Smith, Dist. Capt. 

Wednesday next there will be a run to Petersham for 
a bathe in the river ; 7 p.m. at Eew. 

I should be glad to meet with a companion for a tour 
either in England or France, starting about the middle of 
September, and shall be happy to hear from any member 
who may be at liberty then, or soon after. I shall be dis- 
engaged for three or four weeks. Locality a secondary 
consideration. 

Feltham, Middlesex. H. JsNNDroa 



LONDON BICYCLE CLUB MEETS. 
August 17. 

N.E. District— To^ of Lea Bridge Road, 3.30 p.m., for 

Waltham Abbey. 
N.W. District— " J9ick Straw's Castle," at 4 p.m., for 

St. Albans. 
W. District.— Kew Green, 4 p.m., for St. Albans, md 

Radlett. 
S.W. District. — Surbiton Station, 4 p.m., for Walton, 

Byfleet, and Ripley. 
S.E. District (Croydon Division).— Central Croydon Station, 

4 p.m., for Hampton Court. 
S.E. District (Blackheath Division).— Foot of College Park 

Hill, Lewisham, 3.30 p.m., for Shoreham. 

AuausT 24. 

N.E. District.— h&Sk Bridge Koad, 3.30 p.m., for Ingate- 

stone. 
N.W. District.— " Jsck Straw's Castle," 4 p.m., for 

Essendon. 
W. District. — Kew Oreen, 4 p.m,, for Aldenham Abbey. 
S.W. District — Surbiton Station, 4 p.m., for Reigate. 
S.E. District (Croydon Division).— Central Croydon Station, 

4.30 p.m., for Reigate. 
S.E. District (Blackheath Division].— Foot of College Park 

Hill, Lewisham, 3.30 p.m., tor Reigate. 

AUQUST 31. 

N.E. District— Tof of Lea Bridge Road, 3.30 p.uL, for 

Abridge. 
ir.W. District— '* iwi\i Straw's Castle," 4 p.m., for 

Ridge. 
W. District— Kew Oreen, 4 p.m., for Ripley. 
S. W. 2>M^rtV;^.— Surbiton Station, 4.30 p.m., for Ripley. 
S.E. District (Croydon Division).— Central Croydon Station, 

4 p.m. for East Orinstead. 
S.E. District (Blackheath Division).— Foot of College Park 

Hill, Lewisham, at 3.30 p.m., for Sevenoaks. 



EXCHANGE LIST. 
(TuH> Insertions, not exceeding three lines, for Is.) 

For Sale, 52-inch all-bright Goddard, of Brighton. 
Roller bearings, very efifective front wheel roller brake. 
Cost £24, price f 12.— H. C. Visick, Abercrombie Villa, 
Rosslyn Hill, Hampstead, N.W. 

I shall be glad to exchange a 54-inch Johnson's Mileage 
Indicator for a 56-inch of the same make. — ^W. J. Williams, 
23, Highbury Place, N. 

58-in. Stassen, front-wheel brake, new last season, prioe 
£12.— J. F. Marchant, 59, Bemers-street, W. 

For Sale.— 57-inch new racing " Humber," £12 ; also 
56-inch semi-racer " Humber," £10.— Address, Gilbert F. 
Beck, Chislehurst. 

54-inch " Stassen,'' all btest improvements, price £ll. 
Any fellow wanting a good machine cheaply bad better 
have a look at this one.— H. V. Cleaver, 20, Ladbroke 
Road,W. 



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LONDON BICYCLE CLUB GAZETTE. 



147 



RACING FIXTURES. 

Aug. 17th.— Tower Hamlete Bicycle Club Race Meeting 
at Alexandra Palace. 

Aug. 24th. — Kingston Bicycle Gub. 2 miles Open 
Handicap at Hampton Wick Cricket Grounds 
in Bushey Park ; one of the best grass courses 
in England. Handicapper, Mr. It D. Riicker, 
Jun. Entries (2s, 6d.) close August 15th. 

Aug. 31st.— London Athletic Club Bicycle Meeting, 
Stamford Bridge. 1, 3, and 6 miles Open 
Handicaps, and 2 miles Members'. Tiuree 
Prizes m each event. Entrance Pees, 
Strangers 5s., Members 2s. 6d. each event. 
Forms of Entry to be obtained from Mr. 
Wm. Waddell, Hon. Sec., or the Handi- 
capper, Mr. M. D. Riicker. 

Sept. 7th.— Windsor Bicycle Club, Windsor. 

Sept. 14th.— Civil Service Bicycle Club Race Meeting, 
Stamford Bridge. 

Sept. 28th.— Beckenham Bicycle Club, Beckenham Cricket 

Ground — ^a splendid crass course. Two miles 

Open Handicap. M. D. Riicker, Jun., 

Handicapper. FHirther particulars later on. 

Stanley Bicycle Club. The races promoted by this Club 

— ^fixed to take place last Saturday— were indefinitely post- 
poned on account of rain. 

BURIED BICYCLISTS. 
The following sentences contain buried names of cele- 
brated L.B.C. men. Where the surname belongs to more 
than one member the initials are given : — 

I. 
The most p^owerful enemy Rome ever encountered was 
Mithridates, king of Pontus. 

n. 
Bring pens and paper for yourselves, and a slate get me. 
I erase afterwards what I have written. 

m. 
Tell me ; can air never escape from a balloon unless you 
let it out ? 

rv. 
I never knew mangel-wurzel was fit to eat before — did you ? 

V. 

Lord Raglan, at Sebastopol, locked in the Russians by a 
siege which lasted many montha 

VI. 

"I could'na drown the leetle dog's mither, and so I 
brought them to you." 

vn. 

As we drove round the common I saw one villa perfectly 
covered with rosea 



Answer to Agbostio in Last Week's Number. 
H a M 

livi A 
R hetori C 
A rmad A 
T ho U 

1 ndividua L 
U n A 

^ S ympath Y 

Correct answers received from M. D. Riicker and 
O. P. Beck 



To the Editor of the London Bicycle Club Gazette. 

Sir, — I have this day seen a letter addressed to a fellow- 
member of our Club by an influential member of the Com- 
mittee, which I consider bears upon a question of the 
greatest importance to the Club generally. 

Let me first state the facts which brought this question 
into my notice. Some six weeks ago a member had a 
candidate to propose for election, and the usual card was 
filled up and forwarded to the Hon. Sec. But somehow or 
other at the next meeting of the Committee the candidate 
was ignored. The proposer then wrote for an explanation, 
and in reply he was informed that " we (the Committee) 
decided some time ago not to elect anyone unless some 
Committee-man present knew something of the candidate." 
Indeed ! So the Committee have taken upon themselves 
to add these lines to Rule 6 of the Regulations. 

The writer gives very copious reasons for this " decision," 
but does not say what the nature of this " something " is. 
Now I wish to give publicity to this " decision" for the 
benefit of fellow-members who may have candidates to 
propose, because these hidden rul&s are often the cause of 
great annoyance to the proposer and disappointment to the 
candidate. If an alteration in the mode of electing candi- 
dates is really desirable, by all means let us have the Rules 
amended at a general meeting, and until such alteration is 
framed and published, all deviations fix)m the printed 
'' Rules and Regulations " are, in my opinion, unconstitu- 
tional 

CACTua 

[We insert this letter for the purpose of setting this matter 
at rest once and for all, as on one or two previous occa- 
sions similar inconsiderate criticisms have been passed upon 
the conduct of the Committee. Rules 6 and 7 so evidently 
bear upon their face the desire to keep the Club select by 
every available means, that we are really surprised that 
anyone should take offence at the extra precautions adopted 
to secure this desirable result. It is a too well-known fact 
that members of this or that Club frequently put men up 
for election because they are deficient in tact, when asked 
to propose men to whom they themselves may object. The 
Committee, in such cases, have no means of forming an 
opinion, and are compelled to judge by the proposer of the 
standing of the candidate, thus occasionally introducing 
unwelcome men. One black sheep soon introduces more, 
and the character of the Club suffera Surely it is better 
to postpone a man's election than to blackball him ; and 
the regrettable weakness above mentioned is so well ascer- 
tained, that no one should be annoyed at being suspected 
of it, in the absence of evidence to the contrary, rather 
should men feel honoured at being admitted to a Club 
where so much exclusiveness is observed. — Ed.} 



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LONDON BICYCLE CLUB GAZETTE. 



G- O 

BICYCLE OUTFIHER, CLUB UNIFORMS, 

AND SUNDRIES. 

PURCHASE 

TOUB 

BICYCLE 

ON 

GOY'S NEW PLAN. 

All the Best Makes at Mannfactnrei^s Prioei. 
By anrangement with the Manufacturers orders haye the same 
attention as if forwarded direct to the Works, thus saving the buyer 
a deal of trouble. 

IMMEDIATE DELIVERY. 
WriUfor Particulars and Price Lists, 



TRICYCLES for Ladies or Gentlemen. 
YOUTHS' BICYCLE S. 

GOrS CLUB ROOM, 

HOST OKKTRALLT 8ITUATID. 

Offered FREE to Officers of all Clubs to arrange Matches, 
Committee Meetings, &c. 



GOT,{2i'^C^aS?%"u?^}London, B.O. 

A BIAL BOOH TO BICT0LI8TS. 

PHIVER*S EXQUISITE MANUS ALBA, 

(UOISTBRXD) 
FOR THE HANDS AND FEET. 
Sfsoial Nonos.— Owing to tlie great demand, future prices will be 6d., It., la. ed., 9k 
andto.6d. B7Pott,8d., U. 8d., !>• 8<t., 8i.3d.and8f.9d. 8oU WhcUtalt JffmU, 
J. MASOV, 120. Ctoldhawk Boad. Shepherd's Bush, London, W. 
AeaifTs.— Got, 81, Leadenhall-ttreet. K.C.; Crooke * Co., 87, Praod-«treet. W. ; 
Hill & Son. 4, Hayraarket, S. W. ; A. Markbam, S4fi, Edgware-roMl, W. ; J. Butler, 
63, Qneen't-ioad, St. John'e-wood; Barrow * Co., High-street, Kensington; 
Howard Jc Co^ Charles-street, Hatton-garden. E.C. ; T. Clare, 70, ^ Fenchurch- 
street. E.G. : TliiellaT's Toilet Clnb. Charine-croM Station j at all the MetropoUtan 
BaUway Laratories ; of most Chemists, AGENTS WAN TED . 

A BOON TO BICYCLISTS. 

BIGYGLE RIDING TAUGHT PERFEGTLY 

AT THE 

(DTTrr BIOTTOLE SCHOOL 

The largest in London. 

Sinffle Lesson, Is. 6d. Perfect Biding grueuranteed, 10s, 

Address— CHEQUER YARD, 
OPPOSITE ALDQATE METROPOLITAN STATION* 

ALDGATE HIGH STREET. 
Teaoher-Professor T. QUINTON. 

CHAMPIOW ORNAMENTAL RIDEB. 

THE EMPRESS 

Is acknowledged as the best Roadster. Strong, durable, and easy run- 
ning. Always gives satisfaction. Strongly recommended by members 
of London Bicycle and other Clubs. 

«ole Agent : T. A 8M ILY. DA L8T0H JONCTIOH, E. 

THE NORWOOD. 

A newly-designed light Roadster. A very elegant machine. Will 
stand plenty of work. Weight of 62-inch, 40 lb. City Agent : — 

gf 21, LEADENHALL STREET, ) 1^^.^^. EC 
gi 64, LIME STREET, | London, Kt. 

W. KEEXT, Empress Bicycle Works, Korwood Junction, 8.E« 
Price Lists, One Stamp. 



THE BICYCLE OF THE DAY FOR 1878 IS J. STASSEN'S " NONPAREIL" 

The only machine fitted with Screwless Spokes, wamnted not to break 
or loosen ; patent eccentric brake easily applied and wonderfully eflfectiTe ; 
new patent double-coned adjustable steering gear ; best red rubber tyres, 
friotionlees bearings, and all latest improvements. Every bicyclist ought 
to possess our Patent Circular-wheel Valise. These machines are made 
for work, and are the best and cheapest machines, as they require no 
repairs and never get out of order, and are strongly recommended by 
Members of the London Bicycle Club, and by all who have used them. 
Weight of machine, from 40 lb. or from 1 lb. per inch. 

City Agent: OOT, 21. Leadenhall Street. 
PEABXS, Fnnces S treet, Leicester Sqnare, London, W. 

J- STASSEN & SON, 251. EUSTON ROAD, N.W. 

Faoiort Entrance : BEAUMONT PLACE. ' 
Prospectus Id., with Photo. 8d. All sizes kept in stock ready for delivery. 

T. A. SMILY, DALSTON JUNCTION, LONDON, 

BICYCLE AGENT, AND 

MANUFACTURER OF THE "TRAVailR" AND "TOURIST" BICYCLES, 

Specially adapted for Travellers (commercial and others) and Touiists. 

Price Lists of these and other Bicycles, post free. 

Photos of "Traveller '' No. 1 Bicnrcle, and of John Keen, post bee on 

appucation. 

THE ALERT BICYCLE FOR 1878. 

The only Bi^ele that is fitted with an Adjustable Boiler Bearing, eveiy 

roller of which is warranted to tighten equally towaids the centre. 

For further particulars apply to tiie Manibfacturar, 

£• C^JlIVJOKR, JBnrlneer, AI.BRT ^irORKS, 

LITTLE GOWER PLACE, EUSTON ROAD, N.W. 

(One minute's walk from Gower Street Station.) 

Bicycles of aU hifuis Repaired on the shorUat notice. 

IMPORTANT TO ALL. 
HABBISOV'S ANTI-COBAOSITE PASTE, 

for Preventing Rust, 6d., Is., and Is. 9d. 

HAEEISOlf'S POLISHIlfO POWDER 

instantly removes Rust and Corrosion from Metals, and for Polishing 
Glass, 6d., Is., and Is. 9d. (see advertisement in ''Bicycling Times.'*) 

Free by post for 8, 14, and 24 stamps, of 

SHIBTCLIFP k CO., 66, Goldhawk Bead, flhepherdi Bush, London, W. 

TH!F 

GREAT WESTERN BICYCLE DEPOT, 

87, PEAED STEEET, 

PADDINGTON, W. 

(Three minutes* ualk from Great Western and Praed Street 

Itailway Stations ) 

Proprietors : 

crooke & CO., 

AGENTS FOB ALL FIRST-CLASS BICYCLES 
AND TBICTCLES. 



BICYCLES BOUGHT, SOLD, OR EXCHANGED. 

BICYCLES LET ON HIRE. 

Repairs promptly executed by competent Workmen. 

CHARGES MODERATE. 

BICYCLE SUNDRIES OF EVERY DESCRIPTION. 



Price Lists on Application. 

Within three minutes^ walk of Edgware Road, Praed Street 

(Metropolitan), and Great Western Railway Stations. 
London, 1878. 

Printed for the Proprietors by Darling & Son, at the Minerva Steam 
Printing Office, 85, Eastcheap, London, E.G.— Aug. 15, 1676. 



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FOR PRIVATE OIROULATION ONLY, 



' J" engage done tons A foiter dans leurs ecriis toute personnalite, touts allusion dSpassant les limites de la discussion la 

plus sincere et la plus courtoise" — ^Laboitlbenr 



Vol- L No. 22.] 



Edited bt A. O. WARD & J. S. STOKES. [Thursday, August 22, 1878. 



CONTENTS. 



PAQB 

Bells And Lamps 148 

SsturdAy Kuna 148 

From Havre to Rouen by the Lower Road 149 

To Edinburgh by the East, and Back by the West 160 

Notes on Roads in East Hants 151 

Hampshire Roads :— Addenda et Corrigenda 151 

Ride to Venice 152 

London Bicycle Club Meets 158 



PAOR 

Racing Fixtures 153 

Exchange List 153 

Double Acrostic 163 

A Few more Buried Londoners 158 

Correspondence 164 

ALnswera to Correspondents 154 

Noti ce to Correspondents 154 



BELLS AND LAMPS. 

The Kiogston regalatlons come into force to-morrow. 
Our readers will see that the terminology is not definite, 
and they should, therefore, be careful to be ou the safe side 
and carry good lamps and loud bells. It is such an easy 
thing to say "I did not hear the bell," that, in case of 
prosecution, the bell should be produced in court, in which 
case it would be a manifest advantage to be able to deafen 
the magistrate with the noise. As to lamps, we will give 
Messrs. Salisbury & Co. a gratuitous advertisement, and 
state our experience that they are out and out the best. 
They make a large size now. It is big enough for a 
carriage, and gives a really first-class light. 



Ladies' Challenge Prize. — ^We learn that contributions 
are coming in slowly, but the letter published in another 
column serves to explain this. No doubt the Committee 
will discuss the subject at their next meeting. 



Among the entries for the Otter Swimming Club Baces 
next Friday, 23rd, we see for Novice Race : M. D. Riicker, 
Jun., W. T. Thorn, Jun., F. M. Williams, and A. P. Stokes ; 
and for 8 lengths Handicap, Ladies' Challenge Cup : H. V. 
Cleaver, W. R. Sewell, and R. Newman, all of the L.B.C. 
Any one wishing for a good evening's sport should pay this 
leading swimming club a visit, at eight o'clock on Friday 
evening, at Marylebone Baths. Several L.B.C. men will be 
there, and there is no charge for admission. 



SATURDAY RUNS, 
N.W. District. 
August 17th, — This meet was, happily, in marked con- 
trast to the watery adventures which befel a few of us at 
Hertford. A brilliant afternoon, excellent roads, and a 
favourable breeze, induced a larger attendance than of late, 
and resulted in an extremely pleasant run. Commencing 
with a nucleus of four and increasing gradually up to 
Finchley, the Club was considerably reinforced at Tally-ho, 
and there was eventually a total of thirteen. A great deal 
of amusement was afforded by the appearance of a small 
brother of W. B. Parker, a manikin about four feet high, 
bestriding a miniature machine. We made him ride in 
front between the two biggest men present, and as the top 
of his head was scarcely above Marchant's wheel, the effect 
was very striking. Little Bob went along in capital style, 
and was as fresh as anyone, although we made an unusually 
good pace. At the top of Ridge Hill we rested awhile 
and discovered some early blackberries. From here to 
St. Albans we experienced the benefit of the recent rain, 
for the road which for miles was hardly rideable a month 
ago is now in perfect condition, the stones having all worked 
in. We put up at the " Bell " in St. Albans, and ascer- 
taining that the City Batlis were close at hand in Victoria 
Street, were soon luxuriating therein. Some exciting races 
took place and a few involuntary immersions. We have 
been particularly fortunate this summer as regards bathing, 
this being the fifth consecutive run at which we have 
enjoyed this advantage. We had a very good and plentiful 



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LONDON BICYCLE CLUB GAZETTE. 



meat tea at 28., during which the two Western men looked 
in, but, true to their principles, disdained to join us at the 
festive board. The return was commenced about 8 and 
concluded without incident. Distance 35 miles. Present : 
Alison, Bacon, Dalton, Marchant, N. B. Morris, W. B. 
Parker, Rogers, Tegetmeier, C. C. Underwood, and four 
visitors (Messrs. F. and A. Morris, Richardson, and Little 
Bob). 

J. W. Alison, Dist. Capt. 



Western Districjt. 

The run to St. Albans only brought three men to the 
starting place. We took the road, vid Ealing Common, 
Hanger Hill, and Sudbury, to Harrow Station, where a 
hind wheel required lubricating ; thence through Harrow 
Weald to Bentley Priory, the long and stiff ascent to which 
was ridden in capital form by Mr. Scott (a new member), 
and by tlie Captain. Potts seemed in anything but his 
usual good form, and got down and walked. On arriving 
at the croas road to Watford, the Captaiji expressed a wish 
to try to ride Clay Hill while Scott waited for Potts, but it 
was fearfully loose and heavy, and after three attempts he 
gave it up. Potts here left us and went to " The Old Dog " 
at Watford. We rode back to the cross road, and had a 
glorious run down by Hill Field Lodge. At Aldenham we 
paid a visit to the celebrated tomb, out of which four 
sycamores grow, and through the lanes to Radlett, thence 
through Coney Street and Park Street to St. Albans, Smith 
riding the whole of Holywell Hill and Scott the last rise. 
At " The Bell " the N. W. division, twelve in number, were 
found, amongst them the recreant Colossus of Roads, who 
informed me " he had returned to his first love." We only 
waited eight minutes, spinning back down Holywell Hill, 
readied Elstree in forty-two minutes, and found Elstree 
and Brockley Hills too rough to ride down. Edgware and 
Hendon were soon passed, and the splendid run taken over 
Dollis Hill to Neasdon and Willesden, and we reached 
Acton railway bridge at 10 p.m. exactly. Time from 
St. Albans, including fifteen minutes' stoppage, 2 hours 
23 minutes. Total distance, 47 miles. Present : W. A. 
Smith, W. J. F. Potts, and E. Scott. 

The route next Saturday will be vid Neasdon, Kingsbury, 
and Roebuck Lane to Whitchurch ; thence md Stanmore 
and ELstree (for a bathe if possible). Members who have 
been riding with other Districts are requested to attend 
their District Meet, and keep up the good character the 
District has gained for itself this season. 

W. A. Smith, District Captain. 



S.E. District. 

Holiday-time considered, the S.E. run was a success last 

Saturday. A start was made in good time, seven members 

having turned up. The hill before Sutton was id a very 

rotten condition, and necessitated a dismount on the part 



of one or two men. On descending the hill into Cheam, a 
carriage was observed crossing at that somewhat nasty 
corner, and the signal being given to slow up, J. Potter, who 
with his brother had joined en route, put on his brake in- 
cautiously, and was next seen in the gutter embracing his 
liind wheel. . Neither " Stassen " nor owner were damaged, 
however, and after a good laugh at J. P.'s expense, pro- 
gress was voted, and Leatherhead reached, after an uneventful 
ride vid Epsom. A new route was tried from this place as 
far as Cobham, and turned up trumps. It offers a long run 
down of nearly a milO) and the surface is good. At Cobham 
the usual route was taken for Ockham, and tea was con- 
sumed at the " Hautboy and Fiddle." Cyril J. Turner 
was found there, having ridden up from Southampton after 
a trip into Wales, and thence, vid Bath, to Hampshire. 
The Kingston Club and " Wanderers " were alsQ m'et at 
Ockham, and, with the well-known Mr. Wright, of the 
K.B.C., at the piano, a pleasant evening was passed. After 
waiting till the moon rose, a start was made for home, four 
staying at Ockham. The other five proceeded without 
event as far as Sutton, where a serious disturbance arose. 
Potter was doomed to be conspicuous, for a semi-drunken 
navvy tried to push a stick through his front wheel. Before 
Potter could dismount Dicker was off and busy settling 
with the ruffian. It was some time before the stick could 
be wrenched from him, and the fellow again set upon Potter 
as he tried to mount. J. P. could not stand that, and, 
taking him by the throat, sent him flat on his back. The 
party then remounted, and were not sorry to reach home 
without further molestation. Present : — Bishop, Byers, 
Dicker, Herbert, Oswald, Potter and his brother, F. M. 
Williams, and M. D. Riicker (Captain). 



FROM HAVRE TO ROUEN BY THE LOWER ROAD. 

On the evening of Wednesday, 31st July, I left Waterloo 
Station with a friend and our respective bicycles for Havre. 
We dined at Southampton and arrived next morning at 
Havre, having paid 4s. 6d. apiece for our bicycles from 
London, and Is. each " octroi " on landing. We stayed at 
Havre a day and put up at '* Hotel Frascati," which is 
expensive and not to be recommended. 

Starting at seven o'clock next morning for Rouen, against 
a strong easterly wind, we followed the tram lines as far as 
the " Place Napoleon III.," where we turned to the right, 
passed the railway station, and then rode through the 
suburbs to Harfleur, about 4 miles distant, which boasts of 
a church with a handsome spire but plain interior. 

The road turns to the right, a few hundred yards out of 
Harfleur, and then ascends gradually for a mile on to the 
Plateau de Caux, where it runs level, or nearly so, for six 
uninteresting miles. We were sadly bored by wind and 
dust, and were glad to turn to the right on arriving at St. 
Romaine, and pass for a few miles along pleasant lanes, 
where we were protected from sun and wind. 



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After riding through the small villages of Melamare and 
St. Antoine de la Foret, we joined the main road from 
Tancarville to Lillebonne, and after some slight '' ups and 
downs ** rode, legs up, dowa hill into Lillebonne. We had 
a good and cheap lunch at the '' Hotel de Paris," and were 
informed by the young woman who waited on us that the 
L.B.C. colours were not unknown there. 

We took the left-hand road and walked up the long hill 
out of Lillebonne, which is about 3^ kilos, or 2^ miles, long, 
and had another level for 5 miles, and then the road 
descended, with many curves, a beautifully wooded hill into 
Candebec, an ancient and interesting town, pleasantly 
situated on the Seine about 10 miles from Lillebonne and 
22 from St. Romaiue. Here we rested some time, and 
had a look at the church and other antiquities, and then 
rode along the river for about 6 kilos, or 3f miles, and then 
cut straight across to Duclair, which is 12 miles by land 
from Candebec, and about twice as many by the river. 

After some refreshment we mounted, and, keeping for a 
short time only by the side of the river, passed through 
the village of St. George de Boscherville, and then up a 
long ascent over a hill covered with stunted firs to Cauteleu 
(7 miles). 

From here there is a lovely view of Rouen, and a splendid 
hill down of 3 miles length took us into the village of 
Bapaume, and we entered the town by a long shady avenue. 

We turned up the Bue Jean d'Arc, and put up at the 
** Hotel du Nord," where we stayed two days and were 
well cared for and very moderately charged. 

R. G. Fbancis. 



TO EDINBURGH BY THE EAST, AND BACK BY 

THE WEST. 
Having long wished to visit Edinburgh, I determined 
that I would devote my three weeks' holiday this year to 
that purpose, and go there and back on my bicycle. I 
agreed with my friend, Mr. H. Young, to accompany me, 
and arranged to start on Monday morning, July 1st. Not 
appreciating the idea of the ride from Norwood through 
London, Young resolved to take the train to Barnet, and 
join me there. A day or two before starting I happened 
to mention the circumstance to Mr. P. F. Wheeler, of the 
D.B.B.C, and, finding that he was going to Nottingham on 
the same day, it was decided for him to call for me at 
4 a.m. on the Monday morning. Punctually to the minute 
he appeared, and in a quarter of an hour we were under 
weigh. After walking up the steep part of South Norwood 
Hill, we ran past the Crystal Palace, down through Dulwich, 
and by the side of the tram lines to Vauxliall Bridge ; then 
up by Victoria Station to Hyde Park Corner, and along 
Grove Road and Hamilton Terrace to Kilburn. Here we 
reached West End Lane, and, having passed through that 
place, were obliged to dismount at Child's Hill in conse- 
quence of a fractious horse. This was the first time we 



had got out of the saddle since leaving Dulwich. Passing 
Finchley, we soon reached the great north road, and rode 
up into Barnet at 7.10. Having put up our machines at 
the " Red Lion," we went out to look for Young, and soon 
found him. We then adjourned for breakfast, which was 
well served and cheap. We left at 8.55, and went at a 
rattling pace over the superb road till nearing Hatfield, 
where the road presented the appearance of the sea beach, 
having been completely destroyed by the storm of the pre- 
vious day. We were obliged to walk for a mile or more, 
but about half a mile beyond the town the road resumed 
its good surface, and we found the hills before reaching 
Welwyn very easy work. Running down into this town we 
met a gig driven by an old man of about seventy. The 
horse got a little restless, but he made no effort to control 
it, and finally it drew the gig straight across the road just 
as Young approached. His machine struck the wheel at 
right angles, and, having his feet over the handles, he was 
lifted completely into the gig unhurt. The old man was 
either dumb by nature, or was deprived of speech by such 
an unexpected occurrence, for he did not utter a single 
word from first to last. Unfortunately the centre pin of 
Young's machine was broken, and this necessitated a walk 
into Welwyn, where a blacksmith tried his hand, but was 
quite unequal to the task, so Wheeler and I were obliged to 
leave Young to take the train to Hitchin. A short distance 
out of Welwyn we had to walk a rather stiff hill, owing to 
its rough and loose state. We dined at " The George," 
Baldock, good and moderate, and then rode to Eaton 
Socon (19 miles) without a dismount, over a flat, unin- 
teresting country. The ascent of Alconbury Hill was very 
easy, but the road from the top deteriorated, and it was 
becoming rough before we reached Norman's Cross, where 
we put up for the night. Distance, 87^ miles. " Brooks' " 
quite deserves the praise Newman has bestowed upon it, 
every comfort being found there, aud the charges being 
exceedingly moderate. Mrs. Brooks, however, would be 
glad if bicyclists, intending to stay there, would send a 
post-card the day before, so that their meals may be ready 
for them. 

July 2nd. Up at 6.45, and after enjo3ring a cold bath 
and a good breakfast, left at'8.30. The road to Stamford was 
very bad, and rather hilly. There is a rather steep hill 
down into the town, just before which you pass on the right 
the fine gates of Bui^leigh House. At Stamford we stayed 
for half an hour, and then ran on to Grantham, the road 
continuing bad all the way. At the "Angel" we found 
Young with his machine in order ; he had discovered some 
skilful men at the Workmen's Hall, Hitchin, who soon 
repaired the damage. He stayed at the " Sun," which he 
strongly recommends, and, taking the train, had reached 
Grantham just before us. After dinner Wheeler left, 
taking the road to Nottingham, while Young and I started 
for Newark. After climbing Great Gonerby Hill there is 



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a great improvement iii the road, and, having reached 
Newark, we obtained a good tea at "The Bam," after 
which we visited the Castle ; it is a ruin, and not much 
of it remains ; but the crypt is fine, and the position, over- 
looking the river, good. From here, the road is first-class 
through Tuxford to Retford. We stopped at the " White 
Hart," which is not to be recommended either for comfort 
or cheapness. Distance to-day, 69^ miles. 

July 3rd. Left about ten, the road to Bawtry being 
very loose and bad, but from Bawtry to Doncaster it was 
splendid. Just before reaching Doncaster, the race course 
is passed on the right. We arrived about one o'clock, and* 
stayed at a friend's till four. The road to Ferrybridge we 
found, contrary to our expectations, fair travelling. We 
tried to get some tea here, but everybody in the place had 
gone to a school treat ; however, at Brotherton, a village 
a mile further on, w^e were more fortunate. We here left 
the Great North Road and turned to the right for York. 
The first few miles were fair, but nearing Tadcaster the 
road became very bad, and in wet weather, I should think, 
would be unrideable. Consequently we decided to stop at 
Tadcaster, instead of reaching York as we had intended, and 
we found very good quarters at the " Londesboro' Arms." 
Distance to-day, 44} miles. 

July 4th. Started at 9.30, road level but bad into 
York. We spent an hour and a half inspecting the 
Minster, and were much pleased with it. The view from 
the tower is very extensive, but the country all round is 
extremely flat. Having lunched, we left for Boroughbridge, 
where we rejoined the Great North Road. The first 1 2 miles 
w ere vile, but after passing the village of Green Hammerton 
there was a considerable improvement. Dined at the 
" Crown," the best place but dear, and started up the 
celebrated Leeming Lane. The surface was perfection, but 
it was slightly against the collar all the way to Scotch 
Corner, where you take the right-hand road, which falls for 
8 miles, into Darlington. We stayed at the "King's 
Head." Distance to-day, 61 J miles. 

July 5th. Went to see the old locomotive, which stands 
on a pedestal opposite the station. It is worth seeing, 
being the first one that drew a public train. From here to 
Edinboro' the road is macadam all the way ; the first 10 
miles are really good, but after this the colliery district is 
reached and it is very rough into Durham. After a good 
deal of walking up and down the steep dirty streets, we 
retraced our steps and dined at the " Three Tuns," which 
is a good house. We then inspected the cathedral, which 
is a fine Norman structure, and is the only thing worth 
seeing in Durham. There is a steep hill out of the city, 
and the road to Newcastle is extremely bad. We walked 
down the steep hill through Gateshead to the High Level 
Bridge and rode over, the bridge being asphalted. New- 
castle is paved, so we walked to the *' Turk's Head," where 
we had a very dear tea. After getting clear of the paving 



we mounted and took the road to Morpeth. The first 8 
miles were very bad, but the surface got gradually better 
towards Morpeth, entering which place I discovered that 
the handles of my " Timberlake " were broken in half at 
the middle, where the cogs work the rachet' brake. This 
caused us to stop the night, and we were very comfortable 
at the " Queen's Head." I soon found a most obliging 
blacksmith, named Forster, and he welded the two pieces 
together but was unable to make the brake act, so I had the 
handles fixed and rode the remainder of the tour without a 
brake. Distance to-day, 47^ miles. 

July 6th. Left at 8.30. The wind, which had been 
against us all the way from London, now increased to a 
gale, and we found riding very hard work : to make matters 
worse, the road became very hilly. At Alnwick we had 
lunch, and stayed for a short time to admire the castle. 
The road to Belford was a little less hilly — and it continued 
fairly level to within 5 miles of Berwick, when it again 
became hilly, and there is a sharp fall into the town. 
After crossing the Tweed, the town is paved, so we were 
compelled to walk. From Berwick the road runs along the 
top of the clif& for 6 or 7 miles, and the view, with the 
setting sun shining on the sea, was very fine. Having 
arrived at the small village of Ayton, and finding that 
there was no other inn for 20 miles, we decided to remain 
the night at " The Red Lion," which proved very comfort- 
able. Distance to-day, 56^ miles. 

(To be continued,) 



NOTES ON ROADS IN EAST HANTS. 

Addenda to Route 1, — ^A short mile beyond Bramdean 
the road divides, and a sign-post says the straight road 
goes to Winchester and the right to Alresford ; the latter 
route should be taken, via Cheriton and Ovington Downs, 
as the other goes over the highest point of Gander Down 
and Longwood From the summit on a clear day there is 
a magnificent view ; the greater part of Hampshire, and 
part of Dorset, Wilts, Berks, Surrey, and Sussex can be 
seen. From this point to Winchester is a fine run down, 
with only one sharp turn, which can be seen from the top. 
The hill into Winchester (St. Giles) by this road is 
certainly not safe to ride. 

Last week I put the cart before the horse. Route 11 
should be " Petersfield to East Tisted," not vice versa; 
* The ascent of Stonor Hill commences." 



HAMPSHIRE ROADS: ADDENDA ET CORRIGENDA 
To tlie Editors of the London Bicycle Club Gazette. 
SiBS, — I know few men who have a happier knack of 
describing a route briefly and clearly than has the author 
of the ** Notes on Hampshire Roads," which have recently 
appeared in the Gazstte; but I trust McCuUum will 
pardon me for hinting that he must have fallen asleep over 



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his second paper. The last route, " No. 11, East Tisted to 
Petersfield, via Stonor Hill," is quite unintelUgible as it 
stands. No one would suppose, after reading the account, 
that Steep is at the bottom of the hill and East Tisted at 
the top, and the confusion is the more unfortunate since 
the last sentence is literally true. It is quite worth while 
to go some miles out of the way to see Stonor Hill. 

The correct route is as follows : Soon after crossing the 
railway near Petersfield Station the road divides ; keep to 
the right, and a short two miles, mostly up hill, through 
part of Steep, brings one to the foot of Stonor Hill. The 
first half mile of the ascent is stiff, but the rest very easy. 
As you ascend the view is on the right ; spring and autumn 
are the best times to see it ; in October it is lovely. On 
reaching the top, a straight, undulating road leads into the 
Alton and Famham road, a little south of East Tisted. 

The easiest way to take this route would be to go 
through Farnham and Alton. Turn off beyond East Tisted, 
and descend Stonor to Steep and Petersfield. The hill is 
quite rideable with caution, but, as before mentioned, is 
rather steep towards the bottom. 

If the rider wants a longer round, let him keep to the 
left on entering Petersfield ; at the top of the next hill 
keep to the right, and half way up the next turn off at 
right angles to the right ; a pretty undulating road, with 
good surface, will take him through Rogate, five miles from 
Petersfield ; to Midhurst, twelve miles ; thence he may 
keep straight on to Petworth, and back by Horsham. For 
those who like economy, and don't care about show, Mrs. 
Allen's " Kailway Inn " at Petersfield will be found very 
clean and moderate. 

I may as well take advantage of this opportunity to 
make a few remarks respecting Route 1 — Petersfield to 
Winchester. After crossing the line at Petersfield Station 
the left hand road at the fork must be taken, though it 
looks like a lane ; the straight and broader road goes to 
Alton. After reaching the top of Bourdean Hill (4 miles), 
a handsome new church will be seen on high ground to the 
right : it is Privett Church, built by Mr. Nicholson of 
Basing House, and is well worth a visit ; the tesselated 
marble pavement is especially fine. Turn in at some white 
lodge gates on the right, about a mile from Bourdean Hill, 
and a smooth road leads up to the church. 

About a mile past Bramdeau village the road forks and 
a sign-post says that the straight road goes to Winchester 
and that to the right to Alresford. The straight road does 
go to Winchester, but nobody goes by it. It takes one, 
after much climbing, to the top of Kingswood Down : the 
view from the summit on a clear day is most extensive, 
almost the whole of Hants, Dorset, and Sussex can be seen, 
with part of Surrey, Berks, and Wilts. From the top it is 
an easy run down to Winchester, but the rider must prepare 
to dismount when he comes to the lamp-posts, as the 
entrance into the town by this road is both rough and steep. 



If, then, the day is not clear, or the rider does not feel 
inclined to walk a couple of miles, he had better take the 
road marked " To Alresford," and bear to the left at the 
next fork ; this will bring him into the Alton and Win- 
chester road — well known to most of my colleagues. The 
difference in distance is a mile and a half or two miles — 
about 17 and 19 respectively. 

I trust the "occidental captain" will pardon my pre- 
sumption in venturing to criticise his paper, and will believe 
that 1 am still his, as well as your obedient servant. 

Another Hampshibeman. 

— ,. , . »• 

RIDE TO VENICE. 

According to promise, Mr. Freeth has sent us the 
following brief notes of his progress from day to day. 
More will probably appear next week. 

August 9 (Friday). To Canterbury, 49 miles 4 fur. 

August 10 (Saturday). To Dover and St. Omer, 42 
miles 2 fur. Bad wind and rain against me. 

August 11 (Sunday). To Douai, 51 miles 4 fur. Roads 
almost unrideable ; by help of canal path I managed to 
arrive at Douai ; wind favourable. 

August 12 (Monday). To Cambray, 26 miles 2 fur. It 
took nine hours to get over this distance; roads quite 
unrideable — paved in centre — ^thick mud at sides — ^half 
killed with fatigue. I took a train to Hirson (estimated at 
45 miles), where macadam is reached. Wind unfavourable. 

August 13 (Tuesday). Hirson to Vacherauville, 90 miles 
1 fur. At last I get rideable macadam, and I make use of 
it — through M^zieres, Sedan, and Dun; wind at first 
favourable, afterwards contrary. 

August 14 (Wednesday). Vacherauville to Villers sur 
Mouse, 19 miles. Terrible rain and wind against me. I 
waited three hours at Verdun, and found that the roads 
were no longer passable — something frightful — the machine 
would not go three yards. I was obliged to train it a few 
miles to get a bed. 

August 15 (Thursday). L^rouville to Luneville, 61} 
miles. Bad head wind. 

August 16 (Friday). Luneville to 'Alt Breisach, 83 
miles, over the Vosges A(ountains. 

August 17 (Saturday). Alt Breisach to Neubausen (i.e. 
the Rhine Falls, near Schaff hausen). Directly I cross the 
frontier into Germany better roads and better wind. " Over 
the Black Forest Mountains." H. C. Freeth. 

August 3l8t. — I purpose riding down into Hampshire 
on the morning of the 31st instant, and shall be glad of 
company ; return jouruey next day. I can promise any 
one who joios me a run over some magnificent roads, and 
beautiful scenery. Total distance for the two days, about 
160 miles. " The more the merrier " if good riders. 

W. A. Smith. 

Probable route : Guildford, Farnham, W^oolmer, Lyss, 
Petersfield, Stonor Hill, East Tisted, Filmer Hill, West 
Meon, Droxford ; and back via Cheriton, Alresford, Abbotson^ 
Fairleigh, Basingstoke, Strathfieldsaye, &c. 



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LONDON BICYCLE CLUB MEETS. 

August 24. 

N.E. District.— Letk Bridge Road, 3.30 p.m., for Ingate- 
stoue. 

N.W. District— " JeLok Straw's Castle," 4 p.m., for 
Essendon. 

W. District.— Ke^ Green, 4 p.m., for Aldenham Abbey. " 

S.W. 2>w^rt«^.— Surbiton Station, 4 p.m., for Reigate. 

S.E. District (Croydon Division).— Central Croydon Station, 
4.30 p.m., for Reigate. 

S.E. District (Blackheiith Division).— Foot of College Park 
Hill, Lewisbam, 3.30 p.m., for Reigate. 

August 31. 

N.E. District.— Tof of Lea Bridge Road, 3.30 p.m., for 
Abridge. 

N.W. District— '' Jt^k Straw's Castle," 4 p.m., for 
Ridge. 

W. District— Kew Green, 4 p.m., for Ripley. 

8. W. District^&nrhiton Station, 4.30 p.m., for Ripley. 

S.E. District (Croydon Division). — Central Croydon Station, 
4 p.m. for East Grinstead. 

S.E. District (Blackheath Division).— Foot of College Park 
Hill, Lewisbam, at 3.30 p.m., for Sevenoaks. 



RACING FIXTURES. 



Aug. 24tb. — ^Eingston Bicycle Club. 2 miles Open 
Handicap at Hampton Wick Cricket Grounds 
in Bushey Park; one of tbe best grass courses 
in England. Handicapper, Mr. M. D. Rucker, 
Jun. Entries (2s. 6d.) close August 15tb. 

Aug. 31st. — ^London Athletic Club Bicycle Meeting, 
Stamford Bridge. 1, 3, and 6 miles Open 
Handicaps, and 2 miles Members'. Three 
Frizes in each event. Entrance Fees, 
Strangers 5s., Members 2s. 6d. each event. 
Forms of Entry to be obtained from Mr. 
Wm. Waddell, Hon. Sec., or the Handi- 
capper, Mr. M. D. RUcker. 

Sept. 7 th. — Windsor Bicycle Club, Windsor. 

Sept. 14th. — Civil Service Bicycle Club Race Meeting, 
Stamford Bridge. 

Sept. 28th. — Beckenham Bicycle Club, Beckenham Cricket 
Ground — a splendid grass course. Two miles 
Open Handicap. M. D. Rucker, Jun., 
Handicapper. Further particulars later on. 



EXCHANGE LIST. 
fTwo Insertions, not exceeding three lines, for Is.) 

58-in. Stassen, front-wheel brake, new last season, price 
JB12.— J. F. Marchant, 59, Bemers-street, W. . 

For Sale. — 57-inch new racing " Humber," £l2 ; also 
56-inch semi-racer " Humber," £10.— Address, Gilbert F. 
Beck, Chislehurst. 

54-inch " Stassen," all latest improvements, price £ll. 
Any fellow wanting a good machine cheaply had better 
have a look at this one. — H. V. Cleaver, 20, Ladbroke 
Road, W. 

My 56-in. Norwood, new last month. Too large ; am pur- 
chasing smaller of same maker. Weight 46lb3. complete. 
Perfectly sound in every respect. Price f 12. — ^A. Ogier 
Ward. ^_^___^_^^^_^^_ 

DOUBLE ACROSTIC. 
My first's my second : — 

All, I think, agree 

1. I'm often found on river, road, and sea. 

2. I bring relief, next day, to heavy diners ; 

3. Be warned by me, all rash love-lorn repiners ! 

4. A word that's meet for chicken-hearted whiners. 

5. You find this, when you take boots oif that hurt you ; 

6. Abroad a vehicle, at home a virtue. 

7. Whene'er it comes you'd better answer to it ; 

8. Ride without me, and ten to one you'll rue it. 

9. This was a mighty nigger-stealing station ; 
10. And this, the sad result of dissipation ! 



A FEW MORE BURIED LONDONERS. 
I. 
It is strange how ardently most magistrates hate 
bicycles. 

n. 
Many S.E, men ride when wanting good swims to Eeston 
Conmoion. 

m. 
To send to the L. B. C. G. an interesting holiday journal 
is only fair to the Editor. 

IV. 

If accidents befal cone, roller-bearings should be used. 

V. 

Always be careful how you turn ; errors are often made 
at corners. 

VI. 

When all can insure who will, I am surprised more do 
not do so. 

vn. 

Will anyone beat Appleyard's time from Bath, or not ? 

A. S. ISTER. 

Danger. — The road between Highgate and Crouch End 
is being repaired in three places. Anyono who does not 
like dismounting going down hill had better walk down. 

U. SUABFK. 



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Answers to Last Week's "BimiBD Bicyclists." 

1. W. A. SmifcU 2. Tegetmeier. 3. Nairn. 4. New- 
man. 5. Pollock. 6. G. Smith. 7. Nevill. 

Correct answers received from W. A. Smith, M. D. 
Riicker, Jun., P. M. Williams, A. S. Ister, Cyril J. Turner, 
John Potter. 



To the Editors of the London Bicycle Club Gazette. 

Sirs, — ^I am thinking of investing in one of the cyclo- 
meters (say the M. D. K), and should like to ask some of 
your experienced readers if it would be possible, on that 
make or any other, to carry out the following idea, derived 
from the chartometers, where several moveable dials are 
supplied for the di£ferent scales of maps. 

I propose, then, to take out (by the help of a watchmaker, 
Uen entendu) the dial showing furlongs, and insert one of 
cardboard, which I shall have previously divided into tenths 
(decimals of a mile). This is not so much for greater 
accuracy, as for ease of calculation when adding several 
short distances together, etc. At the same time, when 
more or less accuracy is desired, it will be. very simply 
attained thus : 5 '55 miles will represent what would be 
ordinarily expressed by 5 miles 4J furlongs. 

It will be quite evident that a similar plan, if practicable, 
applied to the large disc (or both), would by calculation 
convert a revolution indicator into a "miler," as also a 
"miler" for a 50-inch wheel into one for a 52-inch, etc.;" 
and by having two discs, ready figured out, it would be 
possible to use the same recorder with a simple change of 
dial for two machines. 

« » .* • 41 

Talking of revolutions, those of your readers who 

'* Hare seen the World within the week " 

will, I feel sure, have been deeply gratified to learn that 
" two friends " of such an exalted and influential personage 
as " Atlas " have actually taken to the " art !" They were, 
of course, not seen at 'Awygate.— Yours truly, 

Owen Roe. 



LADIES*. CHALLENGE PRIZR 
To tlie Editors of the London Bicycle Club Gazette. 

Dear Sirs,— While all members must fully appreciate the 
enthusiastic support given to the Club by A. L. 0. B., I 
think, in justice to many of them, myself included, I must 
ask leave to explain our apparent tardiness. 

At the last race meeting the Captain s sister suggested 
to several of us the institution of a Ladies' Challenge Prize> 
and we all caught at the proposal gladly. Upon discussion, 
however, we decided that it would be premature to set 
about the list of subscribers so soon after the race meeting, 



and so the matter dropped, with the understanding that 
the Committee would take it up again two or three months 
before the next meeting. 

Under these circumstances, I don't think we deserve 
your censure, Messieurs the Editors, for not answering 
A. L. 0. B. at once. I still maintain that it is early to 
move, in spite of your opinion to the contrary, but, when 
we are definitely instructed, you will, I am sure, have no 
reason to complain of backwardness. Members are as- 
suredly flattered to think that the Club merits such zeal 
from two independent sources, but, as I said before, we 
looked for the lead of the Committee. — I am, dear Sirs, 
yours very faithfully, Verax. 



To the Editors of the London Bicycle Club Gazette. 

Sirs, — " There is but one W. A. Smith and the district 
captain is his prophet." Such are the words which, over 
a most noisy tea-table, reached me a few evenings back. I 
don't believe it myself, but am forced to confess that when 
I see the W. Division weekly grow small by degrees and 
beautifully less, and finally concentrate itself into the 
glorified person of the captain, I am filled with thoughts — 
a mixture of admiration and dismay. Admiration that 
all the members of my division should sink their per- 
sonality in one so unique, and dismay when I think that 
the Western runs of old, so well known by their good atten- 
dances, have dwindled at last to performances distinguished 
by such copious doses of " I was," " I did," "I followed," 
and *' I left," as adorned that melancholy page 145 of last 
week's number. — I am. Sirs, yours mournfully, 

One from tub West. 



ANSWERS TO CORRESPONDENTS. 

OwBN Rob. — ^That is matter for a general meeting. 

A. J. Bacon. — ^Thanks. Always pleased to receive them. 
Will ask you next time. 

Lb D7KERB. — ^Thanks for acrostic, which will appear next 
week. Must decline the other as unsuitable. 

A. S. IsTBR.— Thank you. 

R. G. Francis. — Surely 13 fcs. per diem is not very 
heavy. We cannot publish the bill : it is too long. 

Notes on Roads in East Hants.— Next week. 



NOTICE TO CORRESPONDENTS. 

All contributions must be addressed to "The Editors, 
L.B.C. Gazette, 35, Eastcheap, E.C/' and must bear the 
name oi the author^ though not necessarily for insertion. 

They must be written on one side of the paper only, 
and, if immediate insertion is desired, must be received not 
later than Tuesday morning. 



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plus sincire et la plus courtoise" — ^Laboulboe. 



YOL. I. No. 23.] 



Edited by A. 0. WARD & J. S. STOKES. [Thursday, August 29, 1878. 



CONTENTS. 



PAGB 

Saturday Run « 155 

Swimminfi^ 155 

Circular Run through Kent « 156 

London to Dartmouth and Back 167 

Notes on Roads in East Hants 158 

From Rouen to Caen 158 

Ride to Venice 158 



SATURDAY RUN. 
N.W. District. 
August 24tL—The latter part of last week was marked 
by a series of heavy thuuderstorms, accompanied by a very 
excessive rainfall, and on Saturday the showers were so 
frequent and copious as to leave little doubt regarding the 
ultimate condition of any enthusiast who should venture 
out. There are certain members, however, who will not be 
baulked of their Club run by any kind of weather, and who, 
having almost forgotten the luxury attending complete 
saturation, were calmly prepared to renew their experiences 
of one or two of last year's meets. At the outset of the 
run this was no mere probability, torrents of rain com- 
mencing to fall at four o'clock as Alison and Bacon gained 
the top of the hilL The shelter of a tree, and, when that 
became a shower-bath, of a portico were successively sought 
until the waters were assuaged. This happened about 4.30 
when we set off with Burroughs, who had weathered the 
storm at " Jack Straw's." The roads were capital, with no 
mud, and after a short distance quite dry. At Tally Ho 
we picked up Tegetmeier, just on the point of starting by 
himself, as he had given us up. Mr. H. A. Grene (C.S.B.C.) 
also joined us. We had a most pleasant run to Essendon ; 
than which there is, perhaps, no more picturesque village 
in England, but hitherto impracticable for club runs, being 
without suitable accommodation. This deficiency is now 
more than supplied by a perfectly charming little inn — the 
" Salisbury Crest " — discovered not long since by the Cap- 
tain of the Finchley Bicycle Club, who is also one of 



PAOR 

Hon! Soit qui mal y pense 159 

The Evening Race Meeting , 159 

To Edinburgh by the East, and Back by the West 160 

Racing Fixtures 161 

Exchange List 161 

Answers to Double Acrostic, &c 161 

Correspondence 161 



ourselves. It is situated behind the church, at the end of 
a blind road where no one would ever think of looking for 
such a place. We had a most comfortable tea (Is. 6d.) in 
an upper room commanding a beautiful and extensive 
prospect. The setting sun had departed in a blaze of 
glory before we felt inclined to move, and resolving to 
return at an early date we got off before dark, and reached 
home about ten without having had a drop of rain. Dis- 
tance ?S miles. 

J. W. Alison, Dist. Capt 



SWIMMING. 



A good sprinkling of L.B.C. men were present at the 
Marylebone Bath, the head-quarters of the Otter Swimming 
Club, on Friday evening, to witness the races in which 
several of their fellow clubmen took part This flourishing 
club has already secured as members a number of our 
swimming men, and from what we heard last night the 
L.B.C. division is likely to become warm in quantity as 
well as quality. 

The first race was 100 yards for novices, and Thorn, 
Riicker, and F. M. Williams stripped to contest the first 
heat. Riicker and Williams swam an exciting race through- 
out, the former ultimately winning by a yard. Thorn was 
outpaced. In the second heat A. P. Stokes, who is perhaps 
the best novice that ever won a race, had no difficulty in 
beating two others, and in the final finished four yards 
ahead of Riicker without exerting himself. 

We were well represented also in the Ladies' Cliallenge 



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LONDON BICYCLE CLUB GAZETTE. 



Race (200 yards) which followed, Cleaver winning the first 
heat by a few inches only from R. Newman, who was 
receiving five seconds start. Sewell, a very pretty swimmer, 
started in the next heat, but being untrained did not secure 
a place. 

In the final, although Cleaver swam magnificently he was 
beaten by Byrne Jones for first place by the length of his 
body. 

The club holds races every Friday evening at the Mary- 
lebone Baths, and L.B.C. men will always receive a hearty 
welcome. Practising is allowed between the races. 



CIRCULAR RUN THROUGH KENT. 

As a request was made in the Gazettb a short time ago 
for details of circular runs, it is perhaps little more than 
my duty to describe one I made in the above beautiful 
though little 'cycle-travelled county three weeks ago. 

Friday the 9th instant, at three o'clock, Freeth and I 
mounted our machines, he to start on his great run to 
•Venice, I to pilot him to Canterbury. How we rode down 
to Charing Cross, though quite a feat in its way, and there 
took train for Bexley (we wished to spare his delicate 
" Club " the torture of running down Shooter's Hill, which 
was in execrable condition), need scarcely be described. 
From Bexley a level though somewhat dusty little lane 
brought us into the main Canterbury road, at Crayford, 
from whence we rode to the foot of Chatham Hill without 
a dismount. (Note : There is rather a steep and winding 
hill into Strood, and the same law obtains in Strood- 
Rochester-Chatham, for it is not for me to say which is 
which, that has got 'cyclists into such trouble at Win- 
chester). Chatham Hill was, at all events, too loose to ride, 
and possibly too steep, and was therefore walked. (Has it 
ever been ridden ?) From thence the route was through 
Sittingbourne and Faversham to Boughton, which lies on 
and is the beginning of the next hill of note on the road. 
This we were also obliged to walk. Thence to Canterbury 
was almost all down hill, and heartily glad were we to 
reach the place at 10.30 (49 miles), and attack the good 
things provided by the landlord of the " Fleur-de-Lis." It 
being Canterbury week, of course everything was at famine 
price, but, thanks to the previous eflforts of Freeth's 
brother, we were treated both well and reasonably, and the 
house is probably most moderate at ordinary times. 

Next morning at 4.30 we were once more astride, Freeth 
to catch the mail packet at Dover, accompanied by his 
brother, I to return to town. Leaving Canterbury (49) by 
a little side street, I soon found myself on an excellent 
road leading to Ashford, and though passing through a 
somewhat hilly and very picturesque country it is wonderful 
to note how excellently well the road is engineered to avoid 
them. Ashford (61) reached, the road rather deteriorated, 
but was still fair until two miles short of Tenterden, where 



I turned aside, but then became rather loose and heavy 
into Cranbrook, which I reached at 7.45 (81). Here 
breakfast was enjoyed, or rather I should say eaten, at the 
*' Bull Inn," for I cannot recommend the place ; the steak 
was dry and tough and the butter strong. 

For various reasons — a shower of rain amongst others — 
I was not on my machine again until ten o'clock, and found 
myself almost immediately rudely dismounted twice by two 
short though steep little pitches just outside the town ; on 
the second occasion the wheel actually rolled backwards 
down the hill before I got off. These passed, a good road 
led to Goudhurst, and thence on to Camberhurst. Out of 
Goudhurst the road runs down a steep and winding hill, 
described to me at Cranbrook as " the steevest thing in the 
country," which requires care, while at Camberhurst there 
is a stiff hill up on to the common (89) which vanquished me 
half way up. Mounting at the top once more, I rode up 
hill and down dale (how many times I should not like to 
say) over stiff roads, but through ^vild and beautiful 
scenery, to Frant Station ; on better surfaces, though still 
as hilly, to Tunbridge Wells, down a steep hill (requiring 
care) into the town, and up another on the other side on 
to the Common. Here the road was rather bumpy for 
some distance, though more level, the first hill being a long 
one down into Groombridge. From thence, however, 'twas 
nought but up and down all the way to Hartfield, where, 
as I had intended to run through Ashurst to Westerham, 
I conceived it prudent to dismount, in order to take 
bearings (104). By this time it was 1.30, and had just 
commenced to drizzle sharply. Seeing by the map that 
East Griustead was only 7 miles distant, and remembering 
that the road thence had been chosen for racing purposes 
last year, I elected to run for Croydon by that route. 
Possibly it is very pleasant in dry weather, but, as I passed 
over it wet through, I cannot consider myself competent to 
say. The hills (they seemed mountains — ^probably they 
are molehills, though I do not think that one into East 
Grinstead is) appeared endless, and the time interminable ; 
however, as I reached the S.E. head-quarters at Croydon 
(130) precisely at four p.m., they cannot have been so bad. 
Here, after a meal, a bath, and a sleep at the " King's 
Arms," while my clothes were drying, I started at seven 
o'clock for Hampstead as the S.E. Division, which place I 
reached at eleven (159 miles), having been delayed an hour 
at Richmond by a storm. The scenery was lovely in many 
places, everywhere interesting, and as a rule the roads were 
good, being constructed on a composite fasliion — one yard 
of macadam in the centre for the horses, with the sides of 
gravel, which were excellent going. The hills were cer- 
tainly most numerous, and became rather tedious, but as I 
only had to dismount three times on account of them 
excepting the two vexatious spills outside Cranbrook already 
mentioned, they cannot be described as impossible. 

A. J. Bacow. 



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157 



LONDON TO DARTMOUTH AND BACK. 

If time is no object the best route to the west is by 
Farnham, Winchester, Romsey, and Ringwood, which needs 
no description, except to remark that the authorities care- 
fully stoned the road in June, from Rufus Stone for about 
4 miles, so that will be bad all this year ; good and cheap 
inn at Ringwood, the "Crown." In the main street of 
Ringwood every third house is a "pub. ;" I don't ofifer this 
as an inducement but simply record it as a fact. Here 
Barnett left me (this sentence has no connection with the 
preceding one, and I ttust my personal friends will con- 
sider the observation superfluous), returning by Christ- 
church and Lyndhupst, finding the roads good. From 
Wimbome Minster, Dalton gives the road via Blandford ; 
there is an excellent road through B eer Reg is, joining the 
other at Puddletown, missing the big hills. From Dor- 
chester to Exeter via Bridport and Honiton, the road has 
been described by Newman in No. 11. There is one part 
to which I take exception ; he says there is a steep hill 
"close to Bridport.'* I had kept all his sayings in my 
heart, and seeing Bridport yet a great way off, I rode airily 
ahead, but on coming round a. comer I found a hill at an 
angle of 45 degrees. I dismounted hurriedly, my machine 
assisting me ; on getting up I found — ^however that's imma- 
terial, but I did not think a committee-man would have 
gone back on me like that. The bicyclist must look out 
for that hill after passing the third milestone fromRridport. 
At Exeter go down through the town, over the Aire Bridge 
arid turn to the left ; keeping straight on till Alpington 
Church is reached, then take the left again — ^a good road, 
with easy hills to Starcross and Dawlish, steep hill into 
Dawlish must be walked ; thence to Teignmouth is a nice 
walk, but the views make up for the hills — long hilLs — into 
Teignmouth ; the roads in this part are either the red 
sand or limestone, the latter make your bicycle in an awful 
mess, and when wet the surface turns into paste, they also 
have nasty gutters running across for which you have to 
keep a good look out. At Teignmouth cross the Shaldon 
Bridge, a good run of three hundred yards (the tourist 
must make a point of enjoying this, as it is the only piece 
of level running in South Devon, at least, I believe so), and 
then all up and down to Torquay, one bad hill after passing 
under a footbridge across the road. 

Good hotel at Torquay, the "Queen's." Torquay to 
Dartmouth, good surface, but hilly, with a scorcher into 
Kingswear, where the ferry crosses to Dartmouth; good 
hotel, the " Castle ; " rather stiff. Up to Totnes by boat 
(vide Murray), and then through Buckfastleigh to Ash- 
burton and Newton : good road, running by the side of the 
Dart to the first-named place. Torquay to Newton is 
lumpy, through Newton lumpier, but improves after two 
miles, then a long grind to the top of Haldon, with a good 
surface. I believe there is a good view here, but could not 
see 100 yards for rain and mist. After passing the sixth 



stone from Exeter there is another scorcher, beginning with 
a gentle run down, with a jam-like surface, and ending 
with a selection of rocks. Exeter to CuUompton is lumpy, 
but improves to Wellington ; excellent going thence 
. through Taunton, and on to Bridgwater. Having friends 
• at Durston, I turned aside. The main roads here are good, 
but the lanes are very lumpy. I started again through the 
rain along a tow path and cart track across Athelney 
Marsh, looking pleasantly forward to the time when I 
should join that nice main road again at Langport. In the 
fulness of time I got there, and took the Wincanton road. 
I now had twelve miles of the worst road I ever rode on. 
To describe it accurately an expletive is necessary, which 
can be supplied by the gentle reader according to his taste 
and fancy ; however, it improved at Sparkford, and became 
excellent going through Wincanton to Mere. Here there 
is a long pull up on to the downs, whence a fine view of the 
Blackmoor Vale country is obtained ; then a run down of 
two miles, feet up, and a perfect road through Hinton and 
Wilton to Salisbury. Small swimming bath at Salisbury, 
with the water always running through. 

For refreshment I carried a flask of lime juice, which 
lasted me the whole time. When I came across a stream, 
I mixed with water ; a little goes a long way, and is much 
more effectual for thirst than swamping yourself with 
" shandygaff," etc. ; besides, you save a small fortune. 

The west-country joskin is a simple soul, giving you 
plenty of room on the road, but the sportsman needs to 
carry a whole band about with him if he wishes to pander 
to his dismal craving for desultory music. I scarcely rode 
a mile without being requested to favour with trumpet, 
bell, or whistle. 

I cannot conclude without remarking on the inbred 
cussedness of the common fly, not to mention the blue 
bottle. On a hot day, with a long grind up hill, it is 
almost impossible to reach the top without having imperilled 
the safety of your immortal soul in connection with the 
subject of these remarks. A craftily devised puggaree of 
" Catch-'em-alive !" paper would meet the exigencies of 
the case, but this might be objected to as marring the 
general effect of the L.B.C. uniform. 

The machine I rode was a hollow-spoke " Carver," which 
gave complete satisfaction. Distance about 480 miles. 

W. R. Sbwell. 

Sir, — ^Will any of your readers kindly inform me if the 
Seine can be crossed at Caudebec, and if the road to Font 
Audemer via Vieuxport, which runs along the south bank 
of the river, is at all rideable? Also which is the best 
route to Etretat from Havre — along the coast or via 
Harfleur ? — ^Yours faithfully, 

Alfekd Henry. 
32, Warwick Road, Maida Hill, W., 
27th August, 1878. 



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NOTES ON ROADS IN EAST HANTS. 

ItouU Jf^.— Cross road from " Bafc and Ball Inn," Broad- 
halfpenny to East Meon, about 5 miles. From the inn to the 
top of Highdeu Wood (If miles) the road consists of a gentle 
descent of half a mile to a farmhouse, then all up hill to 
the top of the Wood ; can be ridden when the road is in' 
fair order, but is a grind — is now freshly stoned. From 
Highden Wood to East Meon (2} miles) a long descent, 
sharp at first ; the road here crosses the side of the downs, 
at the first comer it turns to the left and is steeper at 
bottom, sudden turn to the right, and a grip across the 
« road, wants care, surface down hill good ; then nearly level 
road to East Meon ; fair going, sometimes rather bumpy ; 
turn to the left down a slight hill into the village. Clan- 
field to East Meon, good road, all up hill to the top of 
Ilighden Wood, then as above. 

Boute 13, — Staple Cross to Wickham, cross road above 
Shoot Hill. About 3 miles. First half of road not good 
but still rideable, down hill for about one third of a mile, 
followed by a rise and fall and a short sharp ascent (safe to 
ride down) ; the road then falls all the way to Wickham, 
good surface last part, and a capital safe run down. 

Route 14' — Southampton to Botley and Wickham via 
Northam Bridge, about 13^ miles. Soon after the bridge, 
a steep hill to go up (wants taking carefully going down), 
at the top is Bittern (old Roman station) ; here the road 
forks, the right-hand one leading to Titchfield ; keep to the 
left up Thoruhill ; the surface is good, and undulating to 
Botley, a pretty road. Take first turn to left after passing 
Botley Station, up hill ; at the top the road forks (the left 
hand road is for Bishop's Waltham) ; keep to the right, 
there is then a fall, succeeded by a stiiF rise, or rather hill, 
and then a bit of level ; crossing the road to Swanmore, at 
Shedfield, it again falls; this is a nasty hill, usually rough, 
then comes another rise, which can be ridden, but is a stiff 
grind, then a long bit against the collar, and a couple of 
ups and downs, and the turn to Drozford is reached. 
Keeping on, down a gentle slope a little way, there is a 
steep hill, with toll-bar at top (wants careful riding down, 
as it winds, if coming the other way). From the toll-bar 
all down hill to Wickham, a nice run down ; hill ends the 
village ; may be classed as a good road the whole way. 

Bouie ^5.— Basingstoke to Alton, via Herriard and Bent- 
worth, 12^ miles. This road branches to the left at Clid- 
desden, just opposite Hackwood P^k, and has a capital 
surface, the greater part of it consisting of undulations which 
can easily be ridden. There is, however, a severe hill at 
Bentworth to ride up, and another down, which latter is 
exceedingly steep, and generally very rough ; I think the 
natives call it King's Hill ; it certainly is advisable not to 
ride it. The scenery at Lasham is very pretty. Just 
before reaching Alton the road turns abruptly to the left, 
and then half a mile further on to the right 

W. A. Smith. 



RIDE TO VENICE. 

The following is a continuation of Mr. Freeth's journey. 
Our readers will observe with regret that this most plucky 
attempt has failed, but a failure such as this is almost a 
success. 

August 18. Neuhausen to (near) Alstetten, 68 miles. 
Good wind, bad roads, heat excessive. I am weatherbound 
by tempest at present (Monday), which is likely to spoil 
everything as I am crossing the range. 

August 19 (Monday). Altstetten (near) to Stuben (in 
Vor-Arlberg), 47 miles. As I feared, the tempest spoilt 
everything. At 1 p.m. S9 miles were covered, at 8 p.nu 
8 more only. 

Aug. 20 (Tuesday). Stuben to Pfunds (in Ober Innthal), 
42^ miles. As I foresaw, the rain has spoilt all, the roads 
being fearful. 

August 21- (Wednesday). Pfunds to Gargazon, 65i 
miles — a wonderful day's journey, equal, according to 
natives, to 100 miles crossing the last mountain range. 

August 22 (Thursday). Gargazon to Botzen, 11 J miles. 
Not two days from Venice, when the felloe of the back 
wheel breaks, a piece of about six or seven inches becoming 
detached, and puts an end to my journey. I am already 
over the Brenner on my way home. I have done my best, 
and I need only add that I have fought against wind, 
weather, and, above all, bad roads. I have had three nasty 
falls, luckily with no serious results. I must reserve all 
else I should like to say for the future. 

H. C. Frebth. 



FROM ROUEN TO CAEN. 



On Monday morning we took our leave of Rouen, and, 
crossing the river by the stone bridge, turned to the left on 
passing the second church. A boulevard took us over the 
railway by a level crossing. At the end of the boulevard 
we turned to the left, and found our road in splendid con- 
dition and perfectly level. We rode through the village of 
La Grande Couronne to Moulineaux, and here took a lane 
on the right, which brought us through pleasant orchards 
to La Bouille a village prettily situated on the river about 
12 miles by road from Rouen. We stayed here about half 
an hour, and then, retracing our steps a few hundred yards, 
ascended the hill overhanging La Bouille, by a winding 
road, which brought us into the Forfit de la Londe, where 
it joined the road we had left at Moulineaux. We had a 
pleasant run down of about a mile, when there is a level 
crossing over the railway, and then, after a gradual ascent, 
\?e quitted the forest, ^he country is uuduhiting at first, 
but rises on approaching Bourgtheroude. After Bourgthe- 
roude we had a tolerably level road until within 4 miles of 
Brionne, when it dives mysteriously down a prettily wooded 
valley, and after another ascent of about 1 mile, finally 
descends abruptly into the town of Brionne, situated on 
the Risle about 32 miles by road from Rouen. 



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159 



After a moderate lunch at the " Hotel da Havre " and a 
look round the town we mounted and crossed the stream 
by the bridge above the hotel. We had one long hill to 
ascend, and then the road was level nearly all the way to 
Lisieux. For about 8 kils. (or 5 miles) we followed the 
Bemay road and then turned to the right along the road 
to Lisieux, which begins by a long avenue of poplars. We 
passed through the little village of Le Marche Neuf, but on 
nearing Duranville the rain which had been threatening 
since noon began to descend in earnest, so we dismounted 
at the small auberge in the hope that it would blow over. 
Bnt no, it would not, so after waiting about two hours and 
seeing that matters did not improve, but rather contrariwise, 
we resolved to push on to Lisieux. 

With wind and rain in our faces, and the roads covered 
with slush, we tried our best to shorten the very unpleasant 
time we were having of it, and reached Lisieux (sixteen 
miles from Duranville) in about an hour and a quarter, 
covered from head to foot with Norman mud, which had 
been rather aggravated by our speedy descent of the long 
hill which landed us into the town. Some intelligent and 
courteous natives politely informed us that we had had a 
spill, and no amount of bad French would persuade them 
to the contrary. 

We were comfortably lodged at the " Hotel d*Espagne ; " 
perhaps too much so, for, though we had intended to ride 
on early to Caen, our good intentions of overnight did not 
come off; and our indolence was rewarded by our seeing a 
fine morning degenerate into a day of frequent and heavy 
thunderstorms, which delayed us nearly all day on the 
road, as yesterday's experience had made us rather shy of 
water. 

The road ascends out of Lisieux for about one and a half 
miles, and is level as far as Le Bosierre. Here the new 
road bears to the left, and, after our experience of the old 
one, we should not want any strong inducement to try the 
new one another time, though it is about 1 kilometre longer. 
At first we were happy enough, but soon found out, to our 
cost, what it was that the new road avoided when we 
encountered several precipitous descents and corresponding 
ascents covered with fragments of loose rock, and perfectly 
unridable. However, we soon joined the main road again, 
and found the road from here to where it descends gradually 
into Caen slightly undulating, and remarkable only for 
the thunderstorms, which surprised and detained us several 
times en route. We stayed at the " Hotel d'Angleterre," 
which certainly did not belie its name on the evening of 
the races. After dinner we strolled out and visited most 
of the churches (which I will leave to Mr. Murray to de- 
scribe), and admired the city in its garb of illuminations. 

We then retired to bed, but found our slumbers sadly 
disturbed by the sound of nightly revelry. 

R- 6, Francis. 
(To be continued,) 



HONI SOIT QUI MAL Y PENSE. 

Who has not felt after a long ride an uncomfortable 
itching sensation in their legs ? To this conundrum, judging 
by myself, the answer must be — ^all. 

Frequently have I been obliged to lower my stockings 
and scratch, to the detriment of my skin, and often have I 
anathematised the material selected by our Club. At length, 
unable to stand it longer, I, much against my conscience, 
discarded the Club stockings for those of a softer substance, 
but imagine my surprise and chagrin when I found the 
efl'ect the same. The fault clearly, therefore, could not be 
in the stockings, and my suspicion fell on tlie garters. I 
remembered seeing two pictures of an elegantly shaped leg, 
one with the stocking kept up by a siispender and the other 
by means of an ordinary garter. 

The suspended stocking, which, according to the descrip- 
tion beneath, was cottnected by straps with a waistbelt, 
fitted beautifully, but the gartered one had dropped in 
wrinkles and entirely spoilt the shape of the leg. I boldly 
entered the india-rubber warehouse and asked for one of 
the articles advertised, which was handed to me, neatly 
packed in a box, by a supercilious grinning assistant, and 
having paid the sum of 3s., I proceeded to test its efiicacy. 
Such was my innocence, that not until I tried it on did I 
perceive the cause of that young man's grins. The waist- 
belt would not meet by four inches. He thought I wanted 
it for another. I braved a repetition of grins, paid 6d. 
more, and became the happy possessor [of the greatest 
improvement of the day for a bicyclist's dress. 

No more itcliing, no more scratching, no more circulation 
stopped by tight garters, no more necessity for' secret baring 
of legs under the table. Fellow 'cyclists, try them. 

SUSPENDEB. 



THE EVENING RACE MEETING. 

Notwithstanding the high class of the entries for the 
Three-Miles Handicap, set for decision on the evening of 
the 22nd inst., the attendance of spectator was very 
limited, there being only a few of the general public 
present, apart from the members of the Club. Some few 
ladies, however, showed the interest they take in our sport, 
by braving the chilly east wind, and were rewarded by 
some of the finest riding we have ever seen. Appended 
are the results of the racing : — 

Heat 1.— H. L. Cortis, Wanderers B.C., 90 yards, 1 ; 
W. Wyndham, L.B.C., scratch, 2 ; C. J. Turner, L.B.C., 
320, 3 ; T Wellbeloved, Surrey B.C., 310, ; G. H. God- 
bolt, Civil Serv. B.C., 240, 0. There was no alteration in 
the places of the competitors until the sixth lap, when 
Cortis passed Godbolt, Turner going on with a strong lead, 
and looking like winning. Wyndham, riding in all his old 
form, was gradually closing up, but he did not gain a place 
until entering the third mile, when he passed Godbolt, and 



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LONDON BICYCLE CLUB GAZETTE. 



in the next lap collared the Surrey man, who, racing hard, 
held him down the straight with the wind. Cortis now 
canght and passed Turner, who, however, stuck close to his 
hind-wlieel. When the bell rang Wyndhfm put on all 
steam, and, racing round at great speed, almost caught 
Cortis, who won by 1 foot ; 2 yards between second and third. 
Time 10 mins. 1| sees. 

Heat 2.— W. T. Thorn, L.B.C., 140 yards, 1 ; A. A. 
Weir, D.B.B.C., 60, 2; N. Whiting, L.B.C., 120, 3; 
A. Herbert, L.B.C., 370, ; R. Newman, L.B.C., 380, 0. 
Weir went off at a great pace and caught Whiting in the 
second lap, but could not get away, Noel making good use 
of him against the wind. In the third lap Herbert passed 
Newman^ and these two raced well together for some dis- 
tance. Thorn, coming up very fast, and, if anything, gaining 
on Weir and Whiting, got into second place entering the 
third mile, and took the lead in the next. Whiting again 
passing Weir. Thorn won by two yards. Weir second, with 
Whiting (close up) third. Time, 9 mins. 54f sees. 

Heat 3.— P. T. East, Surrey B.C., scratch, 1 ; E. H. 
Carr, L.B.C., 320, 2 ; P. M. Williams, L.B.C., 350, 3 ; J. 
Griffits, Univ. Coll. A.C., 250, ; E W. P. Cambridge, 
I. Z.B.C., 80, 0. East, riding splendidly, gained sixty yards 
on Cambridge in the first lap, and passed him in the second, 
and at one mile led him by 100 yards. Entering the second 
mile, the order was Carr, Williams, Griffits, East, and 
Cambridge ; but East now put on a grand spurt, and, rapidly 
closing up, caught the leaders in the first lap of the third 
mile, and, easing up a little, won, hands down, in 10 mins. 
2i sees. 

Heat 4.— W. Quirk, Kingston B.C., 50 yards, 1; 
G. Beeson, Wanderers B.C., 340, 2 ; E. J. Hall, Surrey 
B.C., 120, 3 ; J. W. Young, Lombard B.C., 300, ; J. C. 
Oswald, L.B.C., 315, 0; W. B. Parker, L.B.C., 350, 0; 
P. Dalton, L.B.C., 360, ; A. J. Bacon, L.B.C., 390, 0. In 
the third lap Parker and Dalton came into collision and 
fell heavily, Dalton's sturdy Stassen presenting an extraor- 
dinary -appearance from its injuries. Quirk was rapidly 
gaining on his men, and caught Hall in the third lap. The 
order at 1 mile was Beeson, Bacon, Young, Quirk, Hall, and 
Oswald. In the next lap Quirk ran into second place, 
Beeson still having a good lead. In the first lap of the 
last mile. Quirk put on a tremendous spurt, and ran by 
Beeson ; Hall now showed a most wonderful turn of speed, 
running by five or six men one after the other, but he is 
evidently not in the condition he was last year, and came 
in some distance behind Beeson. Quirk lapped Bacon in 
the last round, and won easily. Time 9 mins. 49f sees. 
Quirk's time for two miles 6 mins. 25 sees. 

Final Heat.— W. T. Thorn, L.B.C., 140 yards, 1; 
H. L. Cortis, Wanderers B.C., 90, 2; W. Quirk, 
Kingston B.C., 50, 3 ; P. T. East, Surrey B.C., scratch, 4 ; 
C. J. Turner, L.B.C., 320, 5; W. Wyndham, L.B.C., 
scratch, 6 ; A. A. Weir, D.B.B.C, 60, ; N. Whiting, 



L.B.C., 120, ; E. H. Carr, L.B.C., 320, ; P. M. Williams, 
L.B.C., 340, ; E. J. HaD, Surrey B.C., 120, 0; G. Beeson, 
Wanderers B.C., 340, 0. East, Quirk, and Thorn were 
favourites at starting. East got a few yards the best of the 
start, and led Wyndham by about eight yards at the end 
of the first lap, but could not get away further. Cortis, 
riding very strongly against the wind, caught Thorn in the 
first lap of the second mile, but Thorn always held him. 
At the half-distance the order was Beeson, Turner, Cortis, 
Thorn, Carr, Williams, Quirk, East, Weir, Wyndham, 
Whiting, and Hall. In the new round Quirk passed Carr» 
and East Williams, and in the next East and Wjmdham 
ran by Carr and Williams. Entering the last mile, Beeson 
still led, with Turner close up, and in the next Cortis and 
Tlkom passed Turner. Two laps from home Cortis assumed 
the lead, with Thorn about one foot behind ; then came 
Beeson, Turner, Quirk, East, Wyndham, Weir, Whiting, 
and Hall, and as they ran down the straight with the wind 
Cortis appeared the winner. Thorn, however, had the 
speed at the finish, and won by about one yard ; Cortis, 
second ; Quirk, third ; East, fourth ; then came Turner 
and Wyndham together ; the others some distance off. A 
splendid race. Time, 9 mins. 37 sees. 

Hall at intervals during the race made some most extra- 
ordinary spurts, showing by far the best turn of speed of 
any with the wind ; in fact, we do not remember ever 
seeing a bicyle travelling so quickly as his did for a short 
distance. 

TO EDINBURGH BY THE EAST AND BACK BY 
THE WEST. 

(Continued /ram our last,) 

July 7 th. Left at 9 o'clock — the wind being still very 
strong against us. The road to Dunbar runs along a valley 
with wooded hills, and was decidedly the best bit of scenery 
we had passed. We had some refreshment at Dunbar, and 
dined at '' The George," Haddington. After leaving here 
the wind suddenly dropped and it began to spot with rain, 
so we hurried over the rough macadam, through MusseU 
boro' to Edinburgh, and riding round the Calton Hill and 
up Princes Street, reached the " Rutland Hotel " just in 
time to escape the rain. It only lasted about an hour and 
a half, and was the only rain we had during our trip. 
Distance to-day, 50 miles. In the evening we strolled about 
the city, went up to the castle, and stayed so long in the 
Princes Street Gardens that we were locked in, and had to 
make our exit over the iron railings. 

July 8th. After breakfast we got our letters firom the 
post office, walked up Calton Hill, and climbed Arthur's 
Seat, the view from which was spoilt by a thick ftiist. We 
scrambled down the steep side and yralked back round the 
Salisbury Craigs to Holyrood Palace. Here the stains of 
Bizzio's blood on the floor were pointed out to us, but it 
requires good eyesight and a considerable stretch (tf the 



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161 



imagination to see them. Leaving here, we walked back 
through the old part of the city, passing John Knox's 
house. Having seen all the sights, we left at three o'clock 
for Gaiasliiels, and had considerable difficulty in finding the 
right road. It was very hilly for about twelve miles, the 
last five being up hill ; from the summit the road runs 
down a beautiful valley for about fifteen miles, but the 
surface was rough. Galashiels is a dirty place, and we only 
stopped long enough to get some tea. Thence we pro- 
ceeded to Melrose, and put up at " The King's Head " — 
not the best hotel, but fairly comfortable. Sir Walter Scott 
says: — 

" If thou would'rt view f«ir Melrose aright, 
Go, visit it by the pale moonlight." 

The moon being so obliging as to shine, and as we wished 
to do right, we went to see the abbey ; but the keeper was 
away, bo we overcame the difficulty by climbing the wall, 
and had a good look at the exterior, but were unable to 
get inside. Distance to-day, 33 miles. 

July 9th. Went again to the abbey and saw the interior 
before leaving for Dryburgh. This abbey lies about a mile 
o£f the main road, but is well worth a visit. Although the 
building may not be so fine as Melrose, the situation is far 
superior. From here we went across a very wild and hilly 
country to Selkirk, and it continued the same to Hawick, 
where we dined at " The Imperial," not Al, though toler- 
able. The road firom thence was mostly on the rise for 
seven miles, when it enters a splendid valley, and is up hill 
for five miles further, but, when the summit is reached, 
there is a grand run down for quite ten miles. The hills 
on each side are very high, and there is a beautiful stream 
rushing alongside the road. After Langholm the scenery is 
lovely, the road running through a magnificent wood by 
the side of the River Esk, which dashes finely among the 
rocks. At Longtown we stayed at the " Graham Arms," 
the best hotel in the town, but very second-rate. Distance 
to-day, 58j miles. 

(To be continued.) 

RACING FIXTURES. 

Aug. 3l8t. — ^London Athletic Club Bicycle Meeting, 
Stamford Bridge. 1, 3, and 6 miles Open 
Handicaps, and 2 miles Members'. Three 
Prizes in each event. Entrance Fees, 
Strangers 5s., Members 2s. 6d. each event. 
Forms of Entry to be obtained firom Mr. 
Wm. Waddell, Hon. Sec, or the Handi- 
capper, Mr. M. D. Riicker. 

Sept. 7th.— Windsor Bicycle Club, Windsor. 

Sept. 14th. — Civil Service Bicycle Club Race Meeting, 
Stamford Bridge. 

Sept. 28th. — Beckenham Bicycle Club, Beckenham Cricket 
Ground — a splendid grass course. Two miles 
Open Handicap. M. D. Riicker, Jun., 
Handicapper. Further particulars later on. 



EXCHANGE LIST 
(Two Insertions, not exceeding three lines, for Is,) 
For Sale. — 57-inch new racing "flumber," iPl2 ; also 
56-inch semi-racer " Humber," £10. — Address, Gilbert F. 
Beck, Chislehurst. 

54-inch " Stassen," all latest improvements, price £ll. 
Any fellow wanting a good machme cheaply had better 
have a look at this one. — H. V. Cleaver, 20, Ladbroke 
Road, W. 

My 56-in. Norwood, new last month. Too large ; am pur* 
chasing smaller of same maker. Weight 46ll». complete. 
Perfectly sound in every respect. Price f 12. — A. Ogier 
Ward. 

Ahswbe to last week's "Buried Londoners." 
Ward. 
Stokes. 
Alison. 
Falconer. 
Coleman. 
Turner. 
Williams. 
Thorn. 
Correct answers received from Cyril J. Turner, E. Scott, 
H. McMillan, E. P. C. (sister of a member), F. M. Williams. 



Answer to Double Acrostic. 

G i G 

E n 

R ome 

A frai D 

R eb'e F 

D iligenc E 

C al L 

i L 

B ome 

B orro W 
No correct answer has been received. A. S. Ister must 
be credited with all but the last light, and wo contess that 
this word seems scarcely fair. 

A letter appeared in our last issue signed " One from 
the West," which, but for an accident which we deeply 
regret, would have had no place in our columns. We are 
desired by the writer to express his regret that it should 
have given any offence, as it was only intended by him as 
a clumsy kind of joke, and was not conceived in any ill 
nature. Under these circumstances, the Editors are of 
opinion that nothing can be gained by publishing the name 
of the writer, but some probable ill feeling, and they 
venture to express a hope that Mr. Smith will think no 
more of the matter. 

ANSWERS TO CORRESPONDENTS. 

J. W. Alison. — ^The subject of your letter has received 
our attention in another column. 

Wasp. — We do not, if we know it, insert ill-natured 
personal attacks. 

Z.— Thank you. 



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LONDON BICYCLE CLUB GAZETTE. 



a- o 
BICYCLE OUTFIHER, CLUB UNIFORMS, 

AND SUNDRIES. 

PURCHASE 

YOUB 

BICYCLE 

OH 

GOV'S NEW PLAN. 

All the Best Makes at Manufacturer's Prices. 
By arrangement with the Manufacturers orders have the same 
attention as if forwarded direct to the Works, thus saving the buyer 
a deal of trouble. 

IMMEDIATE DELIVERY. 
WrUe/or Particulars and Price Li$U, 



TRICYCLES for Ladies or Gentlemen. 
YOUTHS' BICYCLE S. 

GOrS CLUB ROOM, 

U08T CINTRALLT SITUATED. 

Offered FREE to Officers of all Clubs to arrange Matches, 
Committee Meetings, Ac 



(K)T,{2^',MSXISr*'}London, B.O. 

A BE&L BOOV TO BICT0LI8T8. 

PHiVER*S EXQUISITF MANUS ALBA, 

(HIOIBTKRZD) 

FOR THE HANDS AND FEET. 
SrcciAL NoTrcK.— Owing to the irreat demand, itatnre pricei wtll be 6d., It., li. 6d., Sh 
and Si. 6d. By Pott, 8d.. It. 8d.. It. 8d., St. 3d. and 2t. M. 8oU WholaaX€ Agtmt, 
J.MAB09, 120. Ooldhawk Boad, Shepherd*! Bush, London, W. 
AoBi«T8.->GoT, 81, Leadenhall-ttnet, l.C; Crooke * Co., 87. Pratd^trect, W.; 
Hill h. Son. 4, Haymarket, 8.W. ; A. Markbam, 340. Edgware-road, W.; J. Bailor, 
63, Qneon't-ioad, St. John't-irood; Barrow * Co., High-ttroet. Kentlngton; 
Howard dk Co., Cbarlet-atreet, Hatton-garden, B.C. ; T. Claro, 70, Fenchnrch- 
Ktreet. K.C. ; TbiellaT't Toilet Club, ChariiiK.croM StaUon ; at all the Metropolitaa 
HaUwa y Laratoritt ; of mott Chemittt. AQEN TS W AN TED. 

A BOON TO BICYCLISTS. 

BICYCLE RIDING TAUGHT PERFECTLY 

AT THI 

The largest in London. 

Single Lesson, Is. 6d. Perfect RldinfiTfirimranteed, lOs. 

Addrees-CHEQUBR YARD, 
OPPOSITE ALDGATE METROPOLITAN STATION^ 

ALDGATE HIGH STREET. 
TEAOHER-PROFESSOR T. QUINTON. 

CHAHPIOK ORNAMENTAL BIDKB. 

THE EMPRESS 

Is acknowledged as the best Roadster. Strong, durable, and easy run- 
ning. Always gives satisfaction. Strongly recommended by members 
of Ix>ndon Bicycle and other Clubs. 

Sole Agent: T. A. SM ILY, DA ISTOlSr JTJHCTIOir, E. 

THE NORWOOD. 

A newly-designed light Roadster. A veiy elegant machine. Will 
stand plenty of work. Weight of 52-inch, 40 lb. City Agent : — 

g / 21, LEADENHALL STREET, 1 t-„_-„ pp 
gi 64, LIME STREET, / ^^^^' ^■^^ 

W. KEEK, EmpreraBioyole Works, ITorwood Junction, S^. 
Price Lists, One tStamp. 



THE BICYCLE OF THE DAY FOR 1878 IS J. STASSEN'S " NONPAREIL" 

The only machine fitted with Screwless Spokes, warranted not to break 
or loosen ; patent eccentric brake easily applied and wonderfully effective ; 
new patent double-coned adjustable steering gear ; best red rubber tyres, 
frictionless bearings, and all latest improvements. Every bicyclist ought 
to possess our Patent Circulal^wheel Valise. These machines are made 
for work, and are the best and cheapest machines, as they require no 
repairs and never get out of order, and are strongly recommended by 
Members of the London Bicycle Club, and by all who have used them. 
Weight of machine, from 40 lb. or from 1 lb. per inch. 

City Agent: GOT, 21. Leadenhall Street. 
PEASES, Princes S treet, Leicester Square, London, W. 

J. STASSEN&SON, 261, EUSTON ROAD, N.W. 

Factort Entrance : BEAUMONT PLACE. ' 
Prospectus Id., with Photo. 3d. All sizes kept in stock ready for delivery. 

T. A. SMILY, DAL8T0N JUNCTION, LONDON, 

BICYOLB AGBNT, AND 

MANUFACTURER OF THE "TRAVOLER" AND "TOURIST" BICYCLES. 

Specially adapted for Travellers (commercial and others) and Tourists. 

Price lists of these and other Bicycles, post free. 

Photos of ** Traveller" No. 1 Bicycle, and of John Keen, post free on 

appUoation. 

THE ALERT BICYCLE FOR 1878. 

The only Bicycle that is fitted with an Adjustable Roller Bearing, every 

roller of which is warranted to tighten equally towards the centre. 

For further particulars apply to the Manufacturer, 

K. «AI«1^BH, JKns-lneer, A1.JBRT IfTOIKKII, 

LITTLE COWER PLACE, EUSTON ROAD* N.W. 

(One minute's walk from Gower Street Station.) 

Bicydet of aJl kinds Repaired on the akortett notice, 

IMPORTANT TO ALL. 
EABBISON S AHTI-COBEOSIVE PASTE, 

for Preventing Rust, 6d., Is., and Is. 9d. 

HABBISON'S POLISHING POWBEE 

instantly removes Rust and Corrosion from Metals, and for Polishing 

Glasa^ 6d., Is., and Is. 9d. (see advertisement in "Bicycling Times.") 

Free bv post for 8, 14, and 24 stamps, of 

BHIBTCLirF k CO., 66, Ooldhawk Boad, Bhep herdi Bush, London. W. 

THE 

GREAT WESTERN BICYCLE DEPOT, 

87, PKAED STREET, 

PADDINGTON, W. 

( Three minutes' walk from Great Western and Praed Street 
liailway Stations ) 

Proprietors : 

CROOKE & CO., 

AGENTS FOR ALL FIBST-CLASS BICYCLES 
AND TRICYCLES. 



BICYCLES BOUGHT, SOLD, OR EXCHANGED. 

BICYCLES LET ON HIRE. 

Bepairs promptly executed by competent Workmen, 

CHARGES HODEBATE. 

BICYCLE SUNDRIES OF EVERY DESCRIPTION. 



Price Lists on Application. 

Within three minutes' walk oj Edgware Iload, Praed Street 

(Metropclitafi), and Great Western Itailway Statiofis. 
London, 1878. 



Printed for the Proprietors by Darling Sl Son, at the Minerva Steam 
Printing Office, 36, Eastcheap, London, E.C.— Aug. 29, 1878. 



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FOR PRIVATE OIROULATION ONLY, 





' J^engage done tons d ^iter dans leurs ecriis toute personnalit^, toute allusion d^assant ks limites de la discussion la 

plus sindre et la plus courtoise" — ^Laboulbknb. 



Vol, L No. 24.] 



Edited by A. 0. WARD & J. S. STOKES. [Thursday, Sept. 5, 1878. 



CONTENTS. 



PAOB 

Stanley and Civil Service Races 162 

Saturday Run 162 

CInb Runs 162 

To Edinburgh by the East^ and Back by the West fCoiicluded) ... 162 

Racing Fixtures 163 

From Caen to Avranches 164 

Notes on Roads in East Hants 164 



Clapton to Folkestone 

East Grinstead to Eaittbourne... 

Ode to a bicycle 

More Hants roads 

Saturday Meets— S.E. District 
Exchange List 



PAOB 

.. 166 

.. 166 

.. 167 

.. 167 

.. 168 

.. 168 



STANLEY RACES. 
Members are informed that all unused tickets for 
the above, dated August 10th, will be available for 
September 7th. 

CIVIL SERVICE RACES. 
14th September instant. 
Admission tickets for the above can be purchased of 
the Captain and Hon. Sec. at half-price up to the 
above date. 

C. R. HuTOHiNGS, Hon. Sec. 

SATURDAY RUN. 

N.W. DlffTEIOT. 

August Slit. — ^The run to Ridge was duly carried out 
under somewhat trying conditions. We managed to get 
beyond Whetstone with only a sprinkling, but were caught 
soon after in a heavy downpour, which drove us under 
Bamet Railway Bridge for half an ho«r. Naturally taking 
the shortest way, wt Dyrham Park gates, we arrived at 
Ridge at 6 and left after tea at 7, reaching home at 8.30. 
The roads were of course very heavy, indeed, in many 
places almost navigable ; however, this has been only the 
second really wet run this year, and September seems likely 
to make ample amends. Distance 34 miles. Present : 
Alison, N. B. Morris, Tegetmeier, and two visitors (Messrs. 
Atkins and A. Morris). 

N.W. Fixtures for September : 7th— Aldcnham. 14th— 
Shenley. 2l8t— Little Berkhampstead. 28th— Essendon. 
" Jack Straw's *' at 4 p.m. in each case. 



CLUB RUNS. 

On acpount of so many of the leading members of the 
Committee being out of town, it has been impossible to 
convene a meeting during the last fortnight, and the 
fixtures for Club Runs have consequently ruij out. Meets 
will take place in each district next Saturday at the usual 
place and time, the choice of destination of the Runs being 
left to the members present. 

M. D. RiJcKER, Jun., Captain. 



TO EDINBURGH BY THE EAST AND BACK BY 
THE WEST. 
(Concluded). 
July 10th. The road into Carlisle is ahnost level, but 
the city is paved, which caused nearly a mile's walking. 
To Penrith the riding is very fair. Here we left the main 
road, deciding to try our way through the Lakes, partly 
for the scenery, and partly because we had heard of the 
Shap Fells. Soon after leaving Penrith, as we were 
ascending a slight incline, the centre pin of Young's 
machine again broke, and we were compelled to trudge 
back into the town. We soon found a blacksmith, but 
unfortunately he was drunk, and made the job a great deal 
worse than it was ; so I was again reluctantly obliged to 
leave Young to get it repaired if he could, or else to take 
the train. I soon reached Pooley Bridge, the head of 
UUswater, and rode alongside the lake all the way to 
Patterdale. I stopped about half way to see Aira Force, 



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one of the best waterfalk in the lake district. The lower 
end of Ullswater is very fine. After riding past Brother's 
Water I came to the foot of the Kirkstone Pass — ^a regular 
teaser — the road zig-zags all the way up, and was terribly 
rough and loose. In places it required all my strength to 
push the machine, but I stuck hard at it, and reached the 
top in half an hour (Young told me it took him, next day, 
nearly three times as long). At the summit I rode for 
some little way till I came to an inn, which is the highest 
inhabited house in England, being 1481 feet above the sea. 
I walked down to Ambleside (3 miles), riding being impos- 
sible, and then rode by Rydal Water to Grasmere. It is 
only about 4 miles, and the lake is lovely. Having returned 
to Ambleside, I ran by the side of Windermere to Trout- 
beck Bridge, where I stayed at the " Sun Hotel." Distance 
63 miles. 

July 11th. I cannot too strongly recommend this little 
hotel. Everything was beautifully clean and very cheap, 
a good supper, bed, and breakfast being only 4s. It had 
rained heavily during the night, so I found the road to 
Kendal rather sticky. At the post-office I was pleased to 
find a telegram from Young, saying that he had got his 
machine mended, and that he would ride as far as Lancaster, 
and then take the train to Chester, and join me next day. 
From Kendal to Lancaster the road was not good, and from 
Lancaster to Preston it was terribly bad, being little better 
than a cart track, and the ruts full of loose stones, so it was 
a case of riding under difficulties. There was a splendid 
cinder path all the way, but I kept to the road. Preston 
was, of course, paved, and the paving continued for a con- 
siderable distance beyond the town. Most of the way to 
Chorley the road was paved halfway across, the other part 
being fair macadam. At Chorley I found quarters at the 
" Royal Oak," the best hotel in the place, but poor. 
Distance, 62f miles. 

July 12th. The road to Wigan was very fair, but I had 
about two miles walking before I quitted the abominable 
paving of that place. From Newton-le- Willows to War- 
rington about two miles is paved, although the road runs 
through fields, and the remainder is very rough macadam. 
To Frodsham the road was better, but between there and 
Chester I had to pass over no less than four patches of 
paving each about 300 yards long, and all out in the open 
country. At Chester I found Young, and had a walk on 
the curious old walls of the city. After getting about 12 
miles further on it became dark, and we had considerable 
difficulty in finding accommodation for the night, but at 
last succeeded at "The Wiflfen Inn," Malpas, a small 
village about a mile off the main road to Whitchurch, 
Distance to-day 55^ miles. 

July 13th. Ran into Whitchurch, and having walked 
the paved streets we started for Shrewsbury, vid Wem. 
The road was very rough the whole way. At Wem we 
took the longer of the two roads, as we were told it was the 



better. Having dined at " The Raven/' we went to see 
the " Quarry," which is the Shrewsbury recreation ground. 
The Severn runs round it, and the avenues of trees are 
splendid. From here we bad a beautiful run through the 
Stretton Hills to Ludlow. Distance to-day 56 miles. We 
stayed here with friends five dajrs, and much enjoyed the 
beauties of the place and its surroundings. Ludlow Castle 
is one of the finest ruined castles in the country. 

July 19th. Left. Ludlow at 6 o'clock and rode over a 
level but rough road to Tenbury. The next 10 miles had 
a better surface, but were very hilly, and continued the 
same into Worcester (" Hop Pole "). We paid a hurried 
visit to the cathedral and left for Tewkesbury : road level, 
but rough and very dusty. At Tewkesbury we enjoyed a 
bathe in the Avon, and dined at " The Swan." As it was 
excessively hot, we remained here till late in the afternoon, 
and then ran over a level road to Cheltenham. After 
seeing the promenade, we left the town and commenced the 
ascent of the Cotswolds. It is gradual, but rather a long 
pull ; followed by a slightly falling road to NorthbacL 
near which place is the Gloucester County Prison, a for- 
midable looking building. It got quite dark before we 
reached Burford, which lies in a hollow oS the main road, 
and we were not sorry to arrive at " The Bull" Distance 
78| miles. 

July 20. I cannot advise anybody to stay at this hotel ; 
the accommodation and the charges not being in fair pro- 
portion. We soon passed Witney, where quantities of 
blankets were to be seen bleaching in the fields, and reached 
Oxford. The road was not good. At Nnneham Courtenay 
and I left Toung, as he preferred to take it easy and reach 
home next day. The roads were now first-class, and I was 
soon ascending the Chiltems to Nettlebed. From here to 
Henley it is nearly all down hill. Having crossed the 
river, I walked up White Hill and rode to Maidenhead, 
where I stopped for tea at the " White Hart" Prom here 
to Windsor and Egham I found the roads extremely loose 
and sandy, and they were very little better through Staines. 
It got quite dark before reaching Kingston, but knowing 
the road perfectly well, I soon landed myself at Norwood. 
Distance, 86| miles. I enjoyed the trip immensely, having 
had fine weather during the whole three weeks, and I did 
not meet with a single accident. I was riding fifteen days 
and the distance covA*ed was 910 miles. My expenses, 
without any attempt at " screwing," amounted to just over 

ten guineas. Abthue Hsrbbbt. 

' '■ .— « 

RACING FIXTURES. 

Sept. 7th. — ^Windsor Bicycle Club, Windsor. 

Sept. 14th. — Civil Service Bicycle Club Race Meetin^r^ 
Stamford Bridga 

Sept. 28th. — ^Beckenham Bicycle Club, Beckenham Cricket 
Ground — a spWdid crass course. Two miles 
Open Handicap. M. D. Riicker, Jan., 
Handicapper. Further particulars later on. 



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FROM CAEN TO AVRANCHES. 

Nine o'clock on Wednesday morning found us leaving 
Caen. We began by rather a long walk along the Rue St. 
Pierre and Rue de Guillaume Oonquerant, as both these 
streets were roughly paved. The road ascends gradually 
for two miles and then bears to the right, leaving on the 
left the direct road to St. Lo. The country is not very 
interesting between here and Bayeux, and, with the excep- 
tion of one or two pitches, there are no hills, and the whole 
distance can be easily ridden. We arrived at Bayeux, 16 
miles from Caen, at a quarter to eleven, and had our lunch 
at the " Grand Hotel," after which we explored the town. 
The cathedral has a fine western front, but the whole effect 
is spoilt by a central cupola in the semi-Grecian style. 
We had some difficulty in finding the museum where the 
celebrated tapestxy was to be seen, and we did not consider 
that our pains were justly rewarded when we did find it, 
though horses of various and resplendent hues, wifch tails 
sprouting from the centre of their backs, spoke well for the 
originality of the design. 

We left Bayeux at two o'clock, under a broiling sun, and 
did not find the first five miles, which were all up hill, at 
all invigorating. After descending for a mile and crossing 
La Drome Riviere we had another ascent which brought us 
into Vaubaudon, and soon after we entered the Forest of 
Cerisy. The road was nearly level, and perfectly straight 
for 3 miles, but on leaving the forest there were two or 
three slight hills, the last of which brought us to a post 
inn on the right hand (15 miles from Bayeux and 7 from 
St. Lo). We were not sorry to hear that it was all 
down hill into St. Lo. The Hotel du Soleil Levant proved 
very moderate and comfortable, and had a pretty garden 
at the back commanding a fine view of the town. 

A sharp shower greeted us as we were starting next 
morning. The hill out of the town was about *1| miles 
long, and after a corresponding descent, though somewhat 
steeper, we crossed the river, and bearing to the left, 
ascended a small valley, for 3 miles. The country was 
more like England than any we had pa^d through, but 
the roads were fast deteriorating as we advanced westward. 
After encountering a series of hills as far as Ville Vaudon, 
we had a long descent into Percy, a pretty little village, 
and the reputed cradle of the house of Northumberland ; 
and after another stiff ascent, which is just rideable, the road 
descends gradually for 2| miles into Villedieu (20 miles). 

It was in descending this hill that the most startling 
incident of our journey occurred. We were riding down 
^* legs up," and had just passed through a small handet, 
when we perceived a horse and cart, containing a man 
and two huge barrels of cider, ascending the hill. 
The horse stopped and began to rear and back as we 
approached, so we dismounted immediately, and at the 
same time an intelligent native ran to the head of the 
horse. We were wheeling our bicycles past, congratulating 



ourselves on having avoided an accident, when the intelli- 
gent native let go his hold of the horse, and the animal, 
not having regained his equanimity, turned half round and 
bolted through the hedge down a steep embankment ; the 
cart stuck fast between two trees, but the horse, man, and 
casks of cider all disappeared into the field below. For- 
tunately neither man nor horse was hurt ; but we were 
rather surprised to see the whole village come shrieking 
and rushing down the road. We thought that they were 
making straight for us, but, without appearing even to 
notice us, they swarmed down the embankment and were 
soon engaged in wordy warfare with the driver of the cart ; 
and judging from the animated sound of their patois, the 
unfortunate man was getting it very hot for trespassing on 
other people's property. Seeing that we could do nothing 
towards lifting the cider barrels or settling their dispute, 
we rode on into Villedieu and had lunch at the post inn, 
rather a primitive establishment. 

There is a long winding hill out of Villedieu which 
crosses the railway, and, after a gradual descent, another 
hill about a mile in length. At the top we overtook a 
certain Aubergiste, of Avranches, who prided himself on 
his fast-trotting horse. Though the road was rough and 
hilly we managed to show him our heels for the next five 
miles, which brought us to the half-way house. Five 
miles— nearly all down hill — and we came to the river, 
which runs at the foot of the hill upon which Avranches 
stands. Our friend the Aubergiste, whose house stood close 
to the bridge, insisted on our trying some of his ale, and 
afterwards took us across the river in his boat, and we had 
a most refreshing bathe in quite deep water. A long hill 
of about two miles took us up into Avranches, and we 
arrived at the " Hotel du Londres " just in time for 
taUe d'hote. 

We stayed here two days, but were anything but satisfied 
with our bill, though it has since been pronounced as not 
extravagant. R. G. F&akgis. 

(To be continued,) 



NOTES ON ROADS IN EAST HANTS. 
fioute 16. — ^Basingstoke to Fareham via Farleigh Hill, 
Nutleigh, Preston and Brown Candovers, Alresford, Bram- 
dean Common, Brookwood, and Warneford, about 37 miles. 
From Basingstoke to Cliddesdeu the road is level, and bears 
to the right at the fork just outside the town ; at Cliddes- 
den (2^ miles) the ascent of Farleigh Hill commences, but 
for more than a mile, it is only a gentle rise. (This hill 
itself is excessively steep and very dangerous to ride down ; 
it is usually loose.) From the top a very splendid view 
may be had. There is then a good run down, with a 
rather sharp turn at the bottom requiring care, and good 
surface all the way to NutleigL There is another sharp 
rise and fall in the road to Axford. At Preston Candover 
(7^ miles) keep to the right (the other road will be 



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described hereafter), and a good level road runs through 
Chilton and Brown Candover (10} miles) to the gates of 
the Grange Park (Lord Asliburton's). Bicyclists may ride 
through this park. Leaving the park gates on the right, 
keep up the incline on the left, and the summit of 
Abbotson Downs is reached. (Those who like pretty 
scenery may like to take a ride round the racecourse on 
the grass.) From the top of the Downs there is a magni- 
ficent run down into Old Alresford (15 miles), the road 
bearing to the right At the end of the village there is an 
ascent to the church, and then it falls gradually over the 
causeway at Alresford Pond. (Bathing may be had here, 
or at Stratton Hatches). There is a slight ascent into 
Alresford ; turn to the left, towards Alton, and (2 miles 
from Alresford) at Judd's Farm turn to the right — there 
are two stiff hills to be ridden or walked, as the case may 
be, here, the second leads out on to Bramdean Common ; 
bear to the left, and after a slight fall there is another 
ascent, then keep to the right down a lane, which leads to 
Bramdean Bottom. Turn to the left, and, about 300 yards 
on, a road is seen on the right hand. It is the road to 
Brookwood, and a very stiff hill has to be climbed, then 
there is a good run for a mile or so, and a nice run down, 
at the foot of which a lane (with good surface) inclines all 
the way to Warneford (25 miles), thence by direct route 
from Alton to Fareham. 

Route 17, — Basingstoke to Winchester, via Candover 
and Northington, about 19} miles. — From Basingstoke to 
Brown Candover, as per Route 16 ; then either keep 
straight on to the turn for Northington, and up a very bad 
hill, or keep to the right along the meadows to Totford. 
From this point is another equally bad hill to mount. 
The road then skirts the northern side of the Grange, and 
is of an undulating character all the way to the old Aoman 
road called Popham Lane, which it joins at the '' New Inn." 
This route is an agreeable change to the direct one, and 
also avoids the exceedingly dangerous grip in Popham 
Lane, which has smashed up so many bicyclists this year. 

Route i^.— Preston Candover to Ahresford, vid Weald 
and Lanham, about 7 miles. — Instead of turning to the 
right to Brown Candover, as per Route 16, take the narrow 
road which faces you on entering Preston ; it is then a good 
steady grind of 2j miles up to Weald, a most Primitive 
village (celebrated for its Mormon proclivities). After 
passing a pond with a large oak tree in its centre, take the 
right-hand road, and bear again to the right at another 
pond (Newmer's) ; there is then one of the finest runs 
down, right from the top of Fox Oak, past Armsworth 
Manor House (where the writer of these Notes spent a con- 
siderable part of his childhood's days), to Lanham Farm. 
The impetus gained by the run down will carry you up the 
incline at Godsfield, and, turning to the right, it is all 
slightly down hill to Old Alresford. This last four miles is 
really a treat. 



Route 19. — Chilton Candover to Alresford via Bugmore 
Hill, about 5 miles. After riding through Preston, about 
one mile further on, some new farm buildings, with circular 
zinc roo£3, will be seen. Just opposite the entrance to the 
farm is tf gate leading to the " Yew Tree Drive" (the finest 
in England) ; a good road runs right through for nearly a 
mile, a bit against the collar, it then bears to the right, and 
ascends (crossing the downs) to the top of Bugmore Hill, 
there is then a good run down to the junction of the 
Alresford and Abbotson road. Charming views from both 
sides of Bugmore Hill. 

Route 20. — Alresford to Cheriton vid Titchboume, about 
3 miles. Turn to the left at the bottom of Pound Hill, 
Alresford (under the railway arch), and a stiff hill rises to 
the top of the downs above the town, then there is a nice 
run down to the foot of Titchboume Downs. To the gates 
of Titchboume Park there is another stiff piece to ride up, 
and the road then falls all the way to Cheriton ; from this 
village the beautiful road to West Meon vid Bramdean 
Bottom, or that to Winchester via Avington Downs, may 
be taken up. N.B. — ^A road which passes over Eilmiston 
Downs, and another which is carried over Beacon Hill, 
may be both obliterated as unrideable. 

There is also a road which goes straight across from 
Cheriton to Bishop's Waltham vid Beauworth (pronounced 
Beworth), Milbarrow (a tumulus and small inn), and 
Steven's Castle Down, but it is very trying, and although I 
rode and walked over it, I don't think it will bear repeti- 
tion, except for the views, which are very fine. 

Total distance ridden in this trip 455 miles. 

W. A. Smith. 

CLAPTON TO FOLKESTONE. 

Acting upon the advice recently given in the LB.C. 
Gazette by the worthy "Baron Stein," I "sent my friends 
down to tlie seaside," and started last Saturday momiug 
with the intention of "following them by road" to Folke- 
stone. For the benefit of any northem men who may wish 
to ride down any of the Kentish roads I will give a short 
description of the route I took to avoid passing through the 
City and over London Bridge, or else "training" it — ^both 
plans equally undesirable. I left Hackney Downs about 
6.30 a.m. and proceeded down the Lea Bridge Road, which, 
as many N.E. members know, is not to be described trath- 
fully as good. It is bad, but is soon over and fairly good 
roads encountered by way of Leyton, along Whip's Cross 
Road to the "Green Man," Leytonstone, thence straight 
on to the gates of Alderman Finnis's Park ; turn to the 
right, across Wanstead Flats, to Forest Gate ; cross the 
Ilford Road, and proceed by the " Spotted Dog," past West 
Ham Park, to Upton Shmbbery ; here tum to the left and 
follow the road to East Ham ; turn to the right in the 
middle of the village, cross the Barking Road, and all is 
plain sailing to North Woolwich (12 miles from Clapton). 



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The roads are good from Leyton till the new Victoria Docks 
Extension Works are reached, about half a mile from North 
Woolwich. This gigantic undertaking is well worth a visit, 
the Dock Company having contracted for a new opening to 
their docks below Woolwich, thus making them vastly 
more convenient for vessels of large tonnage. Skirt the 
gardens of " Holland ** and you come to the 6. £. Bailway 
Pier at North Woolwich, whence boats cross to South 
Woolwich at frequent intervals ; fare 2d. return for man 
and ditto for beast, no single tickets issued. On landing 
turn to the left up the hill, past the Arsenal gates, on to 
Woolwich Common, where good roads commence and con- 
tinue right away to Eltham. Here the main Folkestone 
Road is reached, but as I was detained for about an hour 
and a half by a considerable amount of very heavy rain my 
idea of the roads afterwards may hardly be the correct one 
for ordinary weather ; besides, the road has been described 
in print numbers of times, notably in the " Bicycle Annual " 
for 1878, which I used and found very useful. While 
waiting under a gateway in Eltham a member of "the 
force" joined me, and in the course of conversation remarked 
in a friendly manner that though the roads were in a fearful 
state, I should find — so soon as I got clear of the village — 
excellent asphalte paths at the side of the road for a long 
distance, which he should strongly advise me to use as I 
'' should not meet any policemen down there, as they had 
not enough men to keep them so far out." I will draw a 
veil over my actions after I got clear of the village, merely 
remarking that the road was a running stream of gravelly 
water, and that human nature is weak. Passing through 
Sidcup I heard a ''cooey," and, dismounting, made the 
acquaintance of R Scott (L.B.C.), who took me in and fed 
and dried me — ^to a certain extent — ^until after about two 
hours of thunder, lightning, etc., it rained only in an 
ordinary manner, and we started, he on a new 56-inch 
bright Stanley which he was anxious to test, and it got 
tested, too, before he reached home again. 

I should recommend any members who wish to get from 
N.E. to S.E. to try this route. 

F. Jolly. 

N.W. District. 

NoncB. — The photographs of the N.W. group are now 
ready, and if those members who took the trouble to re- 
spond to the District Captain's call, and turned up on the 
13th ult., will please call at Oak Hill House any evening 
qfter Monday neart, between 7 and 10*p.m., they can have 
their copies. I am sorry to have been unable to get them 
printed before, but the bad weather we have had lately, 
and the small amount of time at my disposal, must be my 
excuse. Will those members who would like their copies 
mounted kindly send me a post-card at once to that 
effect? 

Norman B. Morris. 



EAST GRINSTEAD TO EASTBOURNE. 

I hope to be able to ride down to Eastbourne at the end 
of next week, and should be glad of some information 
respecting the route beyond East Grinstead. Is there a 
fair road from Uckfield through Hailsham, or would it 
be better to go round by Lewes? J. W. L. 

September 2nd, 1878. 



Knowing the road very well, and seeing that one member 
at least is unacquainted with it, we publish an account in 
hope that it may be useful to others, as so many are this 
year visiting this watering place. The choice of route 
beyond !^ast Grinstead should depend upon the weather and 
wind. If the wind is easterly it is far better to go f^ia 
Lewes;, and also if dry weather has prevailed for a fortnight ; 
the reason being that from East Hoathly to Hailsham you 
run dead east over a sandy plain, which becomes very rotten 
with dry weather. This year, however, the roads are not 
likely to be bad. The Lewes route is the longer, a little ; 
but, in our opinion, far prettier. The first few miles to 
Wych Cross will be slow. There is a run down out of East 
Grinstead ; then a stiffish bit up, and then a long and care- 
needing decline to Forest Row. Here commences the well- 
known drag of 1| miles to Wych Cross, up hill every inch 
of the way, and decidedly lumpy in parts exposed to 
weather action. The scenery, however, should well repay 
the toil. At Wych Cross take the road slightly to the 
right, across what used to be a part of Ashdown Forest — 
now waste land — ^to Dane Hill, a moderate sized village. 
The road thus far is of ironstone, and not as good as 
Surrey men are accustomed to, but still a fair road. 
At Dane Hill, bear to left for Sheffield Green. From this 
last, through Chaily and Cook's Bridge to Lewes, the road 
is simply perfect. In Lewes, do not turn to right after 
crossing over the railway, but rather bear to left and 
inquire. To strangers we recommend a dismount, as the 
turnings are awkward, and there are pome steep bits. 
Lewes to Eastbourne is 16 miles of undulating road, and 
good when once up the first hill. The other route joins 
this at Polegate, 4 miles from Eastbourne. Before entering 
the town the Cemetery is passed on the right, and here 
caution is necessary. Do not go down the hill into the 
old town ; but, half way down, at the first corner, cross 
into a new road on the left. This leads straight into the 
new town, and will in a year or so be the recognised road, 
as it avoids all hills. From Wych Cross to Lewes and 
Eastbourne every hill may be flown, except those into the 
two towns. 

East Grinstead to Eastbourne vid Uckfield and Hailsham. 
Same as before to Wych Cross ; here bear to left, still up 
hill for the most part of a mile. Then there is a miserably 
tantalizing slope across the waste land, smooth and yet very 
lumpy, and no one who respects his machine should fly it, 
good as it looks. The ironstone continues to Maresfield, 



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and from there to IJckfield the road is first class, and " give 
and take '' all the way as far as hills are concerned. At 
the top of the hill out of Uckfield, take the left-hand road 
to East Hoatlily, and then turn sharp to right. From this 
point the road is uninteresting, slightly undulating but 
devoid of point. At Horsebridge turn to right. In Hail- 
sham follow the telegraph, which will bring you to Polegate, 
where the other route is joined. We should pronounce either 
road hilly^ but every hill can be ridden either going or 
coming, W. 



ODE TO A BICYCLE. 



When funds are low and times are bad, 
And all my thoughts but dull, or sad. 
Whose bright looks still can make me glad ? 

My bicycle. 
Or, when I'm ill, and it may hap 
About my food care not a rap. 
Who takes me on a loving lap ? 

My bicycle. 
And gently carries me, with ease. 
Away from things that fret and teaze 
Into the balmy, healthful breeze ? 

My bicycle. 
In rain or sunshine, frost or snow, 
Who goes with me where'er I go. 
And helps me seeds of health to sow ? 

My bicycle. 
When country clowns encounter me 
With looks I do not love to see. 
Who bears me off triumphantly ? 

My bicycle. 
And once, when chased by angry cow, 
That swung along with angry brow. 
Who saved me, though I scarce know how ? 

My bicycle. 
Who preaches " idleness is sin," 
And urges me to race and win. 
Maybe, a pot worth lots of tin ? 

My bicycle. 
How often, when the moon is bright. 
We go for splendid runs at night, 
Betuming with the morning light ! 

My bicycle. 
Oh ! if thy worth the world but knew, 
Thy usefulness, thy beauty too. 
There would be justice done to you. 

My bicycle. 
They could not thee a " nuisance " call, 
Or sum thy virtues up as small. 
My friend, my best-beloved, my aU, 

My bicycle. 



MORE HANTS ROADS. 

It will be better perhaps to begin by saying that the 
distances I give are derived, not from a distance recorder, 
but from local report and calculation on the map, and can 
therefore not to be taken as very reliable. 

1. Beginning at Beaulieu, and taking a line running about 
north-west to Sherborne, 60 miles. Beaulieu West, a hill 
decidedly steeper, rougher, and shorter than the one east 
of the village, has to be mounted, and a very short level 
bit leads to Hatch Pond, just through the gate. Here 
three roads fork, the middle one running south-west is tiie 
direct route to Lymington (8), and goes straight across 
the open forest. It is a level road, but a decidedly 
loose and rough surface as far as Wallhampton, where 
the park may be ridden through, and a fairly steep 
and loose hill brings one to the shore of the Lymington 
river and the bridge across it. After passing over 
this and the level crossing, a sharp turn to the left 
brings one into the town. If not intending to make a 
stop, the rider should keep straight on, cutting across the 
bottom of the steep High Street past the grocer's shop, 
and then keeping round to the right-hand side an easy 
slope puts one into the main road again, thus avoiding an 
otherwise inevitable dismount. The " Bugle," in the High 
Street, may be recommended for moderate prices. Pro- 
ceeding westwards the Lyndhurst Road, round to the right, 
is taken; and then the next turning, sharp to the left, 
leads to Christchurch (20 miles). This is on the whole 
level, with a very good surface, and many windings. About 
a mile from Lymington is a rather sharp dip over the Avon 
Water. From this the road goes through Evelton ; when 
just through this latter the road straight ahead must be 
kept to, though the right-hand turning is broader and looks 
a better road. Another dip, with a winding descent, is passed 
just before Ashley is reached. This is the neighbourhood 
of the Shakers, whose past patron, Hon. Auberon Herbert, 
was at one time to be reckoned among distinguished bicyclists. 
From here the road gets narrow, the surface still good through 
Milton and Chewton. Just after the latter pUce is a sharp 
turn to the right, and this almost hides an awkward water- 
splash that requires caution, and I should imagine a dismount, 
even on the part of the most enterprising rider. Both sides 
are loose and rongh ; the bottom I have not tried. This 
passed, it is easy running into Christchurch, the road falling 
on a gradual incline most of the way. Here there must, I 
am afraid, be a break in my account, as I don't thbk I took 
the right route for getting into the Wimbome road. I 
picked it up, however, at Iford Bridge, I think, and found 
thence a beautiful road quite easily, followed along the 
south side of the Stour to Wimbome (29). From Wim- 
bome to Blandford, entered, I fancy, into a recent account 
in the Gazette, but it was not mentioned which side of the 
river your correspondents took. I see the map gives a 
turnpike road on both sides ; the southern was my choice. 



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168 



as I saw it ran nearer to the stream, and I thought it 
would be consequently less hilly. As I found it agree 
with what was said by P. D., it is, I suppose, the route he 
took. Blandford really seems a highly educated place, for, 
on my catching sight of it, I asked a wayfarer, " Is this 
Blandford?" (112) and was told, with almost scientific 
precision, " It soon would be ! " The north side of the 
river is here taken, the levels very fair for about 2| miles, 
till a point is reached where the road forks. Turn down 
across the river for Durweston. The turning to the right, 
climbing up the side of the hill with alarming energy, leads 
to Shaftesbury, about 10 miles off. From Durweston 
forward the road deteriorates, soon leaving the chalk 
downs behind. (A fine view may be obtained firom Okeford 
Hill, on the left, which I enjoyed by leaving my machine, 
letter-locked, behind a hedge below. Hamilton Hill, on 
the right, commands, I believe, a better one, being higher, 
and standing out from the line of downs.) The route con- 
tinues over oolite, with inclines, but no serious hills, 
past Sturminster and through Stalbridge to Henstridge Ash. 
(The chief inn at Sturminster, I forget the name, but it is 
close to the post office, should be avoided, it is very dear.) 
At Henstridge Ash the road round to the left at right 
angles leads over a rather worse surface, and one or two 
long but not very steep hills, to Sherborne, passing Milbome 
Port on the way. 

2. Returning to Beaulieu, or rather Hatch Pond, a better 
road to Lymington may be had by taking the most southerly 
of the tluree roads before-mentioned (past the B.ed House). 
This has a much harder and smoother surface, and though, 
of course, further round, it was usually my choice. On 
approaching the chapel, about a mile from the pond, turn 
sharp to the right, and thence the road runs straight till a 
small pond is passed on the right. Directly after this is a 
gate on a downward slope ; one has, therefore, to be careful 
to see that the gate is open before preparing for a rush at 
the ascent beyond. This surmounted, it is easy going into 
Lymmgton, bearing round to the right at the first turn ; 
and thence is all plain sailing till Lymington Bridge is 
again reached. 

3. Again starting from Hatch Pond, the third road 
(or that which runs along by the north side of the water) 
leads to Brockenhurst (7 miles). This seems the least 
inviting but is really the prettiest, leading through some 
pleasant wooded peeps. It is, frankly, deeply rutted at 
first for half a mile, but then improves to a very good 
surface, with the exception of one rough downhill '* a mile 
above the town,'' or, perhaps, pretty village of Brockenhurst. 

4. A pleasant deviation from the Lymington and Christ- 
church road would be effected by turning off just before 
Evelton village to the left for Milford (3), good surface and 
level, pass through the village, making for Bockcliff, and 
hence the surface is certainly rougher than the main road, 
but the route passes almost at the edge of the cliff here, 



300 feet high (rather more than the average of this coast). 
A fine view may be obtained across the Needles (especiaUy 
good by moonlight) with the revolving light, showing its 
red, and the lights seen along the curving coast in the 
direction of Purbeck. From this, with, undulations both 
up and down, and from side to side, the road runs into 
Milton (joining No. 1). 

5. Christchurch to Hythe, to Ringwood (9). Along the 
east side of the river is a very level road, with, on the 
whole, a very nice surface, which continues to Fording- 
bridge (15), and perhaps rather deteriorates to Downton (20), 
the river having been crossed at the former place. Turn 
to the right and go through Downton, and, on going under 
the railway arch, a long and steep hill has to be walked up. 
From the top of this it is chiefly down hiU to Landford, 
where the turn to the left, and then again to the right, puts 
one into the road for Ower. This bit is not such a good 
surface as the other, and is rather monotonous, being quite 
straight, with a succession of ups and dovms. At Ower, to 
the right, and then left, and over a level road, Totion is 
reached. Hence progress is made over a continually im- 
proving surface, with three or four sharp rises, past Marsh- 
wood Church to Hythe. Perhaps I might mention that 
from extended personal experience I can quite endorse the 
indirect commendation given to Lane, of Dibden, Hythe. 
He is very handy at repairs, and also moderate. I cannot 
say as much for the ''Drummond Arms," but then it is a 
monopolist. Owbn Rob. 

SATURDAY MEETS.— S.E Dismcr. 

SSPTBMBSB 7th. 

Croydon Division. — Central Croj^on Station, 40 p.m., 
for Seal Meet Blackheath Division at Famborough. 

Blackheath Division. — Foot of College Park Hill, 
Lewisham, at 3.45, for Seal Meet Croydon Division at 
Famborough. 

Sbptembbb 14th. 

Croydon Division. — Central Croydon Station, 4.0 p.m., 
for Leatherhead. 

Blackheath Division. — ^Foot of College Park Hill, 
Lewisham, 3.30 p.m., for Westerham. 

EXCHANGE LIST. 
(Two Insertions, not exceeding three lines, for Is,) 

For Sale. — ^57-inch new racing " Humber," £12 ; also 
56-inch semi-racer " Humber," £10.— Address, Gilbert F. 
Beck, Chislehurst. 

54-inch '' Stassen," all latest improvements, price £ll. 
Any fellow wanting a good machine cheaply had better 
have a look at this one. — ^H. V. Cleaver, 20, Ladbroke 
Road, W. 

My 56-in. Norwood, new last month. Too large ; am pur- 
chasing smaller of same maker. Weight 46ll». complete. 
Perfectly sound in every respect. Price f 12. — ^A. Ogier 
Ward. 

W. A. Smith should have been credited with last week's 
'* Buried Londoners." 



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G- O 

BICYCLE OUTFIHER, CLUB UNIFORMS, 

AND SUNDRIES. 

PURCHASE 

TOUB 

BICYCLE 

ON 

GOV'S NEW PLAN. 

All the Best Makes at Manufacturer's Prices. 
By arrangement with the Manufacturers orders have the same 
attention as if forwarded direct to the Works, thus saving the buyer 
a deal of trouble. 

IMMEDIATE DELIVERY. 
Write for PartictUars and Price Lists. 



TRICYCLES for Ladies or Gentlemen. 
YOUTHS' BICYCLE S. 

GOV'S CLUB ROOM, 



MOST CIKTRALLT SITUATED. 



Offered FREE to Officers of all Clubs to arrange Matches, 
Committee Meetings, &c. 



CK)T,{^',^^SMJrlSr'*'}I'Ondon, B.O. 

A BSAL BOOV TO BICTCUaXS. 

PHIVER'S EXQUISITE MANUS ALBA, 

(KBGXBTERID) 

FOR THE HANDS AND FEET. 
SnciAL Nones.— >(hr1ng to the great demand, ftitore prices will be 6d., la., li. 6d., Sk 
andSi.6d. By Poet, 8d., It. Sd., It. 8d., 8i. ad. and Si. 9d. BoU WhtM»aU Agtni, 
J.MA80K, 120, Ooldhawk Boad, Shepherd's Bnah, London, W. 
AaBifTa.->OoT, SI, Leadenhall-etreet. B.C.; Crooke li Co., 87, Praed-etreet, W. ; 
HUl Sl Son. 4, Haymarket. 8.W. ; A. If^rkham, 340, Edgvare-road, W. ; J. Butler, 
6.1, Qiieen'i.road, St. John'e-wood; Barrow A Co., High-etreet, Keneington ; 
Howard A Co.. Charlea-etreet, Hatton-gardeo, E.C. ; T. Clare. 70, Fenchvrch- 
, E.C. ; ThiellaT'e ToUct Club, Cbarins^roM Station j at all the MetropoUtaa 
ray LaTatoriee ; of meet Chemirta. AGENTS WANTED. 



BaUw 



A BOON TO BICYCLISTS. 



BICYCLE RIDINC TAUGHT PERFECTLY 

AT TRB 

O JL ' i. ' Y BIOTTOIiE! S0B:00X. -, 

The largest in London. 

Single Lesson, Is. 6d. Perfect Bidiner sroaranteed, 10s, 

Address—OHEQUBR YARD, 
OPPOSITE ALDGATE METROPOLITAN STATION, 

ALDGATE HIGH STREET. 

TEAOHER-PROFE880R T. QUINTON. 

CHAMPION ORyAMgyTAL BIDBB. 

THE EMPRESS 

Is acknowledged as the^ best Roadster. Strong, durable, and easy run- 
ning. Always giTes satisfaction. Strongly recommended by members 
of London Bicycle and other Clubs. 

Sole Agent : T. A. 8M ILY, DA ISTOg JUN CTIOK, E. 

THE NORWOOD. 

A newly-designed light Roadster. A very elegant machine. 11^^11 
stand plenty of work. Weight of 62-inch, 40 lb. City Agent : — 

g f 21, LEADENHALL STREET, 1 t-hdok EC 
g t 64, LIME STREET, / ^»»o». ^C 

W. KUKH, EmpreHBieycle Works, Norwood Jnnetion, 8.E. 
Price Lists, One Stamp. 



THE BICYCLE OF THE DAY FOR 1878 IS J. STASSErS " NONPAREIL" 

The only machine fitted with Screwless Spokes, warranted not to break 
or loosen ; patent eccentric brake easily applied and wonderfully effective ; 
new patent double-coned adjustable steering gear ; best red rubber tyres, 
frictionless bearings, and all latest improvements. Every bicyclist ought 
to possess our Patent Circular-wheel Valise. These machines are made 
for work, and are the best and cheapest machines, as they require no 
repairs uid never get out of order, and are strongly leoommended by 
Members of the London Bicycle Club, and by all who have used them. 
Weight of machine, from 40 lb. or from 1 lb. per inch. 

««*«^ij7^A8r«>it%«)T, 21. leadenhall Street. 
FEAKES, Princes S treet, Leieegter Square, London, W. 

Protwctm 1(L, with Photo. 8d. All «be« kept in »tock read y for deUvery. 

T. A. 8MILY, DALSTON JUNCTION, LONDON, 

BICYCLB AGENT, AND 

MANUFACTURER OF THE "TRAVEUER" AND "TOURIST" BICYCLES, 

Specially adai>ted for Travellen (commercial and others) and Tourists. 

Price Lists of these and other Bicycles, post free. 
Photos of "Traveller " No. 1 Bicycle, and of John Keen, post free on 
application. 

THE ALERT BICYCLE FOR 1878. 

The only Bicyde that is fitted with an Adjustable Keller Bearing, every 

roller of which is warranted to tighten eoually towards the centre. 

For further particulars apply to the Manufacturer, 

B. C^A1V]>£R, Bnrlneer, AI.JBRT Ifr^RKS, 

LITTLE GOWER PLACE. HUSTON ROAD. N.W. 

(One minute's walk from Qower Street Station.) 

BicycUt of aU kinds Mepaired on the ahortut notice, 

IMPORTANT TO ALL. 
EABJaiSOK'S ANTI-COEBOSITE PASTE, 

for Preventing Rust, 6d., Is., and Is. 9d. 

HABRISOK'S POLISHIITG POWDER 

mstantly removes Rust and Corrosion from Metals, and for Polishing 

Glass, 6d., Is., and Is. 9d. (see advertisement in " Bicycling Times.") 

Free by post for 8, 14, and 24 stampp, of 

gmETCLiry dt CO., ee, Ooldhawk Boad, Shepherds Bush, London, W. 

THE 

GREAT WESTERN BICYCLE DEPOT, 

87, PRAED STREET, 

PADDINGTON, W. 

(Three minutes' walk from Great Western and Praed Street 

Jiailwatf Btations.) 

Propristobb : 

CROOKE & CO., 

AGENTS FOB ALL FIBST-CLASS BICYCLES 
AND TBICYCLES. 



BICYCLES BOUGHT, SOLD, OR EXCHANGED. 

BICYCLES LET ON HIRE. 

Repairs promptly executed by competent Workmen. 

CHARGES MODERATE. 

BICYCLE SUNDRIES OF EVERY DESCRIPTION. 



Price Lists on Application. 

Within three minutes' walk oj Edgware Boad, Praed Street 

(Metropolitan), and Great Western Bailuay Stations, 
London, 1878. 



Printed for the Proprietors by Dahliko k Son, at the Minerva Steim 
Printing Oflfice, 86, Eastcheap, London, E.C.— Sept 6, 1878. 



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FOR PRIVATE OIROULATION ONLY. 



' T engage done tons cL fwter dans Uurs ecrits toute personnalit^, toute allusion dSpassant les limites de la discussion la 

plus sincere et la plus eourtoise" — ^Labotjlbenb. 



Vol. L No. 25.] 



Edited by A. 0. WARD & J. S. STOKES. [Thubjsdat, Sept. 12, 1878. 



CONTENTS. 



PAOB 

Notice of Rengnationof Hon. Sec 169 

Housing of Bicydes during the Winter 169 

Committee 169 

Cambridge University Bicycle Club v. London Bicycle Club 170 

The Kingrton By-Uw 170 

Saturday Buns 170 

Addenda to " London and Dartmouth " 171 

More Hants Roads 171 



From Avranches to St. Malo 

A Week in Dorsetshire— London to Salisbury.. 

Bambles from Wimbome Minster 

Badng Fixtures 

Saturday Meets 

Correspondence 

Answers to Correspondents 



PAOB 

.. 172 

.. 178 

.. 178 

.. 175 

.. 176 

.. 176 

.. 176 



NOTICE. 

It is with much regret that we have to announce that 
Mr. C. R. HuTGHiNGS has resigned the Secretaryship of our 
Club. We are quite certain of representing the general 
feeling of the members in tendering to Mr. Hutchings our 
sincere thanks for all the patient and zealous work he has 
done for us. We had occasion quite lately to point to the 
energy and professional skill he devoted to the cause of the 
Bicycling Union, and, indeed, of bicycling generally ; but 
those only who saw him then at work can fairly estimate the 
tact needed and shown at those critical times, and the 
skilful, unassuming labour of our Secretary. We venture 
to express a hope that, though his home is no longer in 
London, he will still find it possible to remain a member of 
the Club which owes so much to him. 



HOUSING OP BICYCLES DURING THE WINTER. 

Mr. Erwin, the landlord of the " Coach and Horses '" 
Hotel (the Club Depdt) at Kew Green, has very handsomely 
offered the Committee the use of the room now rented by 
the Club GRATIS during the winter months. Members 
who ride regularly throughout the year will no doubt 
appreciate his kindness. Of course, if washing and dressing 
accommodation is required, it must be at the rider's 
expense. 



COMMITTEE. 

At the meeting of the Committee held on Monday, the 
9th inst., the following gentlemen were elected members : — 

SeoondAT. 



P. Byers 
7. Godlee 
E. H.Ca]T 



Nam* and addivu. 
Houldsworth, J. B., 19, 

Coleman Street Merchant D. J. Bnssell 

Weir, Archibald A., 

Gothic Hall, Enfield... Gentleman C. Pocwra 
Herbert, Alfred, South Member of 

Norwood Park Stock Exch. Arthur Herbert 

Webster, Herbert Ca^ley, 

The Firs, Waltham 

Abbey Clerk 



J. B. Bogen B. Newman 



Cut Head Quaetebs. 

The Sub-Committee reported that they were still engaged 
in a search for a suitable room, but that they had not yet 
been able to meet with one. 

Besiqnation of thb Hon. Sbg. 

The Chairman read a letter from Mr. Hutchings in- 
forming the Committee that, being on the point of entermg 
a business in the country, he was compelled to resign the 
office of Hon. Sec. 

It was then proposed by Mr. Riicker, seconded by Mr. 
Trollope; and resolved unanimously, that Mr. Hutchings's 
resignation be accepted as from the 14th inst., with the 
cordial thanks of the Committee for the time and trouble 
expended by him in the service of the Club. 

Until a new Hon. Sec. is appointed, the Captain has 
most kindly undertaken to dischaige the duties of that 
office. 



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LONDON BICYCLE CLUB GAZETTE. 



Club Minutb-Book. 
It was proposed by Mr. Ward, seconded by Mr. A. W. 
Barrett, and resolved uiianimoasly, " That an index of the 
minutes from the commencement of the Club be prepared, 
and that the kind offer of Mr. W. A. Smith, to prepare the 
same, be accepted/' 

EvEiaNa Ragb MsETiNa. 

Mr. Riicker put in the account showing the financial 
result of the meeting, which account was passed unani- 
mously. 

Ebw Qbeen Clubboom. 

Mr. Smith stated that Mr. Erwin, of the " Coach and 
Horses," Kew Green, had asked him to make known to the 
Committee that he (Mr. Erwin) felt under an obligation to 
the Club for establishing the Clubroom at his hotel, and 
should be pleased to extend the accommodation for 
members and their machines through the winter, without 
further payment. 

It was then proposed by Mr. Smith, seconded by Mr. 
Turner, and resolved unanimously, " That the very hand- 
some offer of Mr. Erwin be accepted, with the best thanks 
of the Committee." 

Match with Cambbidqb UNivBBsrrT. 
It was decided to fix Saturday the 26th October for this 
event. Full particulars of the terms agreed upon will be 
found below. 

C. R. HuTOHiNas, Hon. Sec. 



CAMBRIDGE UNIVERSITY BICYCLE CLUB v. 
LONDON BICYCLE CLUB. 

In No. 13 of our Gazbtte there appeared a challenge 
from the C.U.Bi.C., and a match has been arranged to take 
place on the Cambridge Ground on Saturday, October 26th. 
The following are the terms agreed upon : — 

That the contest coBsist of three eventB — one, four, and fifteen mUei; 
the Clab winning two oat of the three to be considered the winners. 

The third event to be contested in any case, no matter what the retplt 
of the other two. 

A dead heat to count as a tie, and not to be contested again. 

Both Clubs to be represented by three competitors in each race. The 
mile to be run off in three separate matches^ the Club winning two out 
of three to be considered the winners of the event, and the other two 
events each to be run in one heat. 

Those who are members of both Clubs to be barred. 

It is hoped that our best riders will go into strict training, 
and do their utmost to uphold the prestige of the Club. 

Those who would like to ride in either of the matches, 
and are prepared to train, should send in their names to 
me. K more than three of our men enter for either event 
a trial race will be run on October 22nd, should it be con- 
sidered necessary, in order to ascertain the best men. 

The number of our members who are racing this year is 
not large, and we cannot expect the three best to compete 
in all the eyents. A different course of training would be 



required for each distance, and we should, if possible, have 
three separate teams. Practice and training work wonders, 
and were some who occasionally ride in handicaps and 
receive long starts now to make up their minds to uphold 
the honour of the Club, by October 26th we should have 
three good teams without any long tails. 

A General Meet will in all probability be arranged for 
those who care to ride down to witness our first Inter-Club 
races. 

An early start will be necessary, but with this long notice 
it is hoped that members will be able to take a holiday on 
that day. 

M. D. BtJOKEB, Jun., Captain. 



THE KINGSTON BY-LAW. 
Inquiries made on behalf of the Union reveal the fact 
that this by-law has yet to be advertised at the Town Hall 
for six weeks, and to be confirmed by the Home Secretary, 
before it comes into force. The district affected will be 
the borough of Kingston, not the district of the Surbiton 
Improvement Commissioners or the Kingston Highway 
Board. It would not appear that the Corporation is actu- 
ated by any anti-bicycling prejudice, for they have volun- 
tarily given the town Club various facilities for meeting, etc 
The Union has, however, evidently plenty to do in seeing 
that local authorities keep within their powers, and do not 
injure bicycling by their by-laws, and riders will give great 
help to the *good cause by sending timely notice of any 
new by-laws proposed to the Hon. Sec. Bicycle Union, 3, 
Lombaoxl Street, E.C. 

. SATURDAY RUNS. 

N.W. DiSTEIOT. 

September 7th, — ^The month of September is, without 
doubt, the best time of year for thoroughly exhilarating 
rides, and those who are able to take fiill advantage of the 
beautiful autumn weather may say that their lines are 
fallen in very pleasant places. We may expect to hear of 
some very long night rides this week, induced by the 
splendid harvest moon (one would shrink from insinuating 
any connection between these and the mysterious mental 
influence which our satellite is said to possess). Pleasant 
recollections will be retained of last Saturday's run, in 
which seven members took part. Biding vid Temple 
Fortune and Hendon, we were agreeably surprised to find 
Colin Deep Bridge convalescent, the stratum of rocks on 
the surface being partially pulverised. Having passed 
Edgware, we turned aside in order to afford certain indi- 
viduals, rather addicted to exploring, an opportunity of 
satisfying themselves as to the existence of a lane whidi 
(they said) ran parallel to the main road to the foot of 
Brockley HilL Having looked at the beginning of it, the 
majority elected to proceed by the road, leaving three ad- 
venturers to penetrate the trackless waste. Newman 



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171 



returned home at Ed^are. The pioneers overtook the 
others at Aldenham, and, as there was difficulty in getting 
tea, we ran on to the bathing-place at Watford, and after- 
wards adjourned to the '' Essex Arms/' where a good 
tea (2s.) was fully appreciated. The return journey was 
made by nearly all md St. Albans for the sake of a good 
moonlight run. Bacon and Freeth rode Holywell Hill in 
that city. Distance, 44 miles. Present : Alison, Bacon, 
Freeth, Newman, Powell and brother, Sewell, and 
Tegetmeier. 

J. W. Alison, District Captain. 



S.E. DiSTMCT. 



The members of this district have been indulging in 
holidays and racing to a great extent lately, and Club runs 
on Saturday afternoons have been almost, if not altogether, 
neglected ; but Saturday last saw some of its members 
returned, and a most enjoyable run was made to Seal, in 
Kent. The Croydon and Blackheath Divisions met at 
Famborough and rode via Green Street Green and River- 
head to Seal* The surface of the roads being now in 
splendid condition, Polhill was ridden at a pace, and then 
came the well-earned ''fly away" down to Riverhead. 
Tea at 2s. 3d. a head was served at " The Teoman," at 
Seal, which was plentiful and good, and a place where all 
'cyclists are welcome. Two members, whose energies can 
never be satiated, determined to ride home ma Wrotham 
and Gravesend, the others returned home the direct road. 
Present : H. 0. Bishop, R H. Carr, Herbert, Barrett, 
Dicker, Potter, Scott, Turner. N.B. — It is much to be 
regretted that some members of this District have, up to 
the present time, not attended a single Club Meet ; they 
are earnestly requested to put in an appearance before the 
close of the season. 

Ctril J. Turner, District Captain. 



ADDENDA TO "LONDON AND DARTMOUTH." 

Should any member be in want of repairs at Bridport, 
young Barker, South Street, will be found a very competent 
man (from personal experience). I have been surprised at 
not seeing anywhere of a deviation attempted through 
Ottery to avoid (between Honiton and Exeter) the fearful 
bit of road that lies beyond "Fair Mile Inn." From 
Exeter the towing-path of the Ship Canal may be ridden 
for about two miles. It is not very grand /running, but 
better than the road, and of course quite level. By turning 
through a back gate, on the left-hand side of the road 
about 1} miles from Exminster, easier gradients and better 
surface may be found to Starcross. The road runs through 
Powderham Park, and when approaching the little village of 
that name bear round to the left, then past the church, the 
side of the railway is followed, a view of the castle being had 
on the right. Is not the " steep hill " mentioned actually 



" in " more than " into " Dawlish ? If so, it may, I think, 
be described as short, steep, and with two turns, as it were, 
past the post office ; as it cuts abruptly into the main 
street, care is certainly required. About half way between 
Dawlish and Teignmouth (just before the two worst hills), 
where the road crosses a stream by an embankment, and a 
lodge is seen on the road side, turn down the uninviting 
lane to the left, and in 100 yards the sea wall of Teign- 
mouth may be reached. Along the unfrequented end there 
is magnificent running for half a mile, and of course dead 
level, which is a pleasant variety, even if one remains un- 
mounted. " W. R S." omits to mention that from Torquay 
to Newton may be called level for the district, and will 

perhaps excuse 

Owen Roe. 



MORE HANTS ROADS. 

From Ower to Romsey (3 miles) undulating, with fair sur- 
face ; thence beautiful surface and level up the valley of the 
Test ; the east bank is taken, and, running along by the 
side of the railway, there is a fairly steep hill near Compton 
Ho. Directly after this the first turn to the left should 
be taken ; surface not so good to Horsebridge Station. 
Here, crossing the railway, and soon after the river, the 
west bank is kept to through Houghton, to Stockbridge (13). 
Here the river is recrossed, and a back road through Leck- 
ford leads over a good surface to Fullerton Bridge, where 
the Anton joins the Test. Turn to the left, over the rail- 
way, and soon again to the right, thence, as far as I 
remember, the surface is not quite so good, and there are 
one or two short hills, to Andover (21). I have been par- 
ticular in saying which side of the valley should be taken, 
as the natives would direct one through King's Sombome, 
and, again, Longstock, both of which should be avoided by 
those who do not care for frequent and rough hills of flint. 
My destination being in the neighbourhood of Haydon Hill, 
I again ran into the Test valley at Hurstboume Tarrant. 
The fearful hill (very rough and steep, but short) approach- 
ing this place from the south requires, I think, a word of 
warning. It is close after the turnpike. From Hurstboume 
to Okenwood (33), quite a bye-road, is very level, but 
rough. 

I should be obliged if any member could give me particu- 
lars as to surface, etc. from Fullerton Bridge through Whit- 
church to Overton and Basingstoke. Would not this be a 
pleasanter route as between Romsey and Basingstoke than 
that through Winchester ? 

Totton to Lyndhurst has been described in the Gazette. 
Beyond here on to Brockenhurst is a very pretty bit of 
road— a couple of rideable hills, and then a long slope 
down to Brockenhurst (3j). Due south leads over the 
railway to Lymington, surface still good or better, but 
rather hilly, though all rideable (8j). 

I mention this last, as from Imowing the mainland part 



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LONDON BICYCLE CLUB GAZETTR 



of it, I should imagine a very pleasant oircolar ran could 
be made, starting (say) from Southampton, thence through 
Lyndhurst to Lymington, here crossing to Yarmouth, south 
west having been " done," cross again (say) by Byde to 
Stokes Bay, and thence, at least from Titchfield, good 
surfaces complete the round. The distance (a minimum, 
I suppose, of 60 miles) could, of course, be extended, (1) 
Downton, Christchurch, eta, (2) Bomsey, Ower, Lynd- 
hurst, etc. 

Of roads to be avoided, not so much for hills as bad 
surface, I might mention — 

Beaulieu to Lyndhurst (8). The first mile of this to 
Gulverley Gate is level, and good surface thence through 
the open forest, with ruts and rough short hills, and 
occasional soft places. About Gulverley Ghite some very 
pretty and varied scenery may be found. I have often 
hidden my bicycle in some nook, and rambled about here. 
For any one passing through, say, from Hythe to Christ- 
church, it might be worth while to diverge a couple of 
miles, as otherwise nothing of the woodland of the forest 
would be seen. 

Beaulieu to Marshwood (6) can also not be recommended ; 
it is rough, and somewhat soft as a whole, though with 
about a mile of good hard surface at each end. 

Lyndhurst to Bolderwood is a pleasant bit (4 or 5) for 
views, but is rather rough and decidedly hilly, running into 
the Stoney Cross and Bingwood road. 

At Southampton, Cheetham (St. Mary's Street) is quite 
a useful man at repairs, and at the " Sun," members who, 
like myself, don't desire always to patronise the largest 
hotel, will find very fair quarters. It is just opposite the 
Hythe Pier. 

Perhaps I might mention that here, as in other districts, 
I have used W. H. Smith & Sons' maps (4 miles to 1 inch), 
and, besides being extremely convenient for the pocket, 
find them very accurate. The route I have attempted to 
sketch up the Test, is one of the few instances in which I 
have found them misleading. 

Owen Bob. 



FBOM AVBANCHES TO ST. MALO. 

We left the "Hotel de Londres," at Avranches, a little 
after 10 a.m., under a very threatening sky, which, how- 
ever, cleared up as the day advanced. The first object that 
met our view was a bicyclist — the only one by the way that 
we saw in France. His dress was decidedly unique : a 
large rush hat ornamented with red braid almost extin- 
guished his head. He wore a loose blue tunic and brown 
fustian trowseis, and a pair of top boots completed his 
attire. He had not much breath to spare for the salutation, 
" Bon voyage mes camarades," but somehow we did not 
feel proud of the connection. After descending a long 
winding hill down from the town and riding for about three 
miles diorxg a moderately level road, we crossed the river 



Selune at Pont-au-Baud, and ascended a V-shaped hill 
commanding a lovely view of Mont St Michel and the Bay 
of Cancale. From here to Pontorson the road is nearly 
straight, and passes through a well-wooded country and 
over a succession of easy hiUs. About half-way we crossed 
the railway from Avranches to Dol still in course of con- 
struction, and arrived at Pontorson, 15 miles from Avranches, 
at half-past eleven. Pontorson is not a particulariy attrac- 
tive place, and consists of one long broad street, the dull- 
ness of which is enlivened by innumerable barking curs : of 
course they did not let us pass without a regular ovation. 
There is a macadamised road from here to Mont St Michel 
about 5 miles distant 

Leaving Pontorson we crossed the river Gorresnon, the 
boundary between Brittany and Normandy, and had a very 
indi£ferent road through a fertile district with pretty 
scenery for seven miles, with no hills of any moment. The 
road improves at the foot of a long ascent of two miles, 
from the top of which we had our last glimpse of Mont 
St Michel, and then a long run down the road, rising 
slightly on entering Dol (12 miles). The road from here 
to Dinau if fairly level for the first four miles, and then 
after a long gradual rise to Plerguer, hilly all the way to 
Dinau. Some of the pitches are steep, and the whole road 
is not unlike the one from Godstone to Biverhead, but has 
not so good a surface. At Vieubourg we crossed the main 
road from St Male to Bennes, and after riding over a 
magnificent stone viaduct we entered Dinau (17 miles), 
and put up at the " Hotel du Commerce," which we can 
recommend as good and very cheap. 

We spent the evening and next morning exploring the 
town. The rain fell heavily all night, and the morning 
was also very moist. At 12 o'clock it cleared up ; so, as 
we wished to catch the boat from St Male, and as the 
times of the steamers which ran down the river did not 
serve, we were obliged to give up the beauties of the 
Banche, and adopt what proved the rather unpleasant 
alternative of riding to Dinard. The road begins by 
descending a long wooded hill out of Dinau, and is thea 
moderately hilly to Dinard The surfiice had been fearfully 
cut up by the heavy rain, and was in an execrable state, 
being composed chiefly of macadam, with occasional patches 
of lumpy chalk. To make matters worse, it was market 
day somewhere in the neighbourhood, and all the peasants 
were conducting their animals to the market Our bellsi 
though supplemented with yells, were not of the least use 
in clearing the road. The aborigines trudged stolidly 
along in the middle of the road, and would scarcely 
give us room to pass, and now and again we were treated 
to some choice piece of rustic witticism which we took to 
be French for " Tour wheel's agoing round ! " Here and 
there was an individual on one side of the road with his 
pig on the other, and the two connected " hand and foot " 
with a cord. To cross over the road would have seemed 



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the shortest way oat of the difficulty, bat the Breton miiid« 
as obtusely obstinate as the very swine, thought otherwise, 
and endeavoured to bring Mr. Pig to its way of thinking 
by sundry but futile haulings. It was with feelings of 
devout thankfulness that we first caught sight of Dinard, 
which appeared to us the perfection of sea-side places. It 
stands on a point jutting out into the bay of St. Malo, 
with a lovely view, on one side, of the mouth of the Ranche, 
with the trees creeping down to the water's edge, and on 
the other looking out towards the open sea, while near the 
shore the deep-blue water is studded with rocky islets. 

We had dinner at a small hotel just above the landing 
stage, and then crossed by steamer to St. Male. The 
captain, a select specimen of French politeness, started the 
vessel at a moment's notice before some English ladies and 
the luggi^e were embarked. However, they hired^a sailing 
vessel and brought themselves and the luggage over in 
time for the Southampton boat. We paid only 3s. apiece 
for our bicycles from St. Male to London. The unpleasant 
weather that welcomed us on our return to English shores, 
compelled us to abandon the idea of riding from South- 
ampton. B. Q. F&ANOis. 



A WEEK IN DORSETSHIRR— LONDON TO 
SALISBURY. 

My destination was Wimbome, at which place I was 
going to spend a week with Keynes ; our intention was to 
thoroughly hunt up the surrounding country per bicycle. 
How we succeeded will be seen presently, at any rate we 
saw quite enough during our week to make us wish for 
more time to carry our explorations farther. 

The afternoon of Friday, the 16th of August, was not 
exactly the time one would choose to commence a bicycle 
expedition. The weather was the sample August weafcher 
of 1878. Rain had fallen heavily during the morning, only 
to be succeeded in the afternoon by sullen thunder-showers. 

I left Tufnell Park about 2 o'clock, and skirting the 
north-west of London by way of Chalk Farm, Swiss Cot- 
tage, and Willesden, in due time arrived at Acton. 
Gunnersbury Lane being up for sewage works, a somewhat 
lengthy detour had to be made through Ealing. The 
Brentford macadam surpassed itself, and it was with a 
sigh of relief that I turned off into the Staines Road ; but 
loose wet sand, with a head wind, did not constitute any 
great improvement. At Egham Hill I made my first dis- 
mount, and after walking up the hill, procured a passable 
tea at a little inn on the right. 

The monotony of the route as far as this had only been 
relieved by the frequent showers, but now ever3rthing was 
changed, the country was no longer flat and uninteresting, 
and I bid good-bye to Jupiter Pluvius after a winding-up 
streamer at Virginia Water. The roads now ran much 
better, for, although very wet, there was a good hard surface 
underneath the mud. 



Soon after passing Bagshot, the hill up to the "Jolly 
Farmer " is encountered, a mountain to look at, but not so 
bad to ride when you know the trick of it. The hill 
defeated, the view from the top was very fine. The setting 
sun combined with a cloudy sky caused the high range of 
Hampshire Downs to stand out grandly on the left horizon, 
whilst conspicuous by their fantastic forms the Devil's 
Jumps and Pepperharrow Beacon could be clearly discerned. 

Riding up a hill near Hartford Bridge I heard a snorting 
and clanking on ahead, and soon discovered a couple of 
lights. Half a minute more, and I came across a man with 
a flag. *' Traction engine," thought I. In answer to a 
blast on the bugle the steamer drew over to its proper side 
of the roadway and passed on, making hubbub enough to 
frighten all the horses in the neighbourhood. 

Aided by the light of the rising moon I soon reached 
Basingstoke, where I put up for the night at the " Red 
Lion" (comfortable, but expensive). The next morning 
I started soon after 7 o'clock. The roads were in grand 
order, but the wind was against me still, and much stronger 
than the preceding day ; however, as I Iiad plenty of time, 
it did not matter much. A restless horse soon caused a 
dismount ; the groom was very polite, and thanked me for 
my trouble. He told me that the horse took fright at a 
bicycle some days back, and ran over a fabulous number of 
fields before it could be stopped. , 

Overton and Whitchurch being passed, I presently 
arrived at Andover, where I was not sorry to get some 
breakfast. From here to Salisbury, through the Wallops, 
the road becomes decidedly hilly, but the surface is first- 
rate. The view of the road, running on ahead over the 
downs in snake-like jumps, is not encouraging when the 
wind is against you. I was to meet Keynes in the market- 
place, and, by a curious coincidence, he from Wimborne, 
and I from London, both rode into it at the same instant. 

And here my narrative ends, as Ke3mes has undertaken 
to send in an account of our joint adventures. The run 
down to Salisbury, though devoid of the exciting incidents 
which one often reads of in bicycle tours, was much enjoyed, 
the scenery being very pretty and the roads good. 

Akthur E. Buokleb. 



RAMBLES FROM WIMBORNE MINSTER 
As it is more than likely that the above-named important 
place may be unknown to some of my readers, I will begin 
by stating that it is situated in south-eastern Dorsetshire^ 
on the Weymouth line of the London and South Western 
Railway. The neighbourhood is pretty, and the roads, 
though sometimes hilly, are good. The town boasts a fine 
old Norman minster, and a handsome grammar school, 
where education used to be served out to the youth of the 
neighbourhood at the rate of £3 3s. per annum, but I 
believe the price of the article has been raised of late years. 
Of the local magistracy, one member, at least, is possessed 



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LONDON BICYCLE CLUB GAZETTE- 



by a deeply-rooted aversion to bicycles, while the chief 
constable is an officious and self-important personage, whose 
idea of the speed at which our unfortunate steeds should 
be driven through the streets is four miles per hour. 
Verbum sap. 

Arriving here on Tuesday, 13th August,'' having no 
distance competition to sit behind me, like black Care, I 
followed my inclination, and dawdled lazily about for two 
or three days. On reaching home on Thursday evening, I 
was informed that an L.B.C. man had been seen in the town^ 
and next morning had the pleasure of encountering Law, 
and riding with him as far as Wareham, on his road to 
Weymouth. Having arranged to meet Buckler at Salisbury, 
I started for that city shortly after breakfast on Saturday, 
17th August, not without sundry anxious glances at an 
ominously black mass of cloud which hung apparently 
motionless on the left-hand horizon. tThe wind being fair, 
I determined to try the hilly but direct route via Cran- 
bome. This road for some miles follows the course of the 
little river Allan, and for some inscrutable reason has, 
instead of being taken along the valley, been carried over 
the spurs of the low hills which bound the valley, the 
result being a very up-and-down condition of things. The 
surface (gravel) was a little sticky after the heavy showers 
of the day before, but the morning was delightful, and, 
with wind astern, I was soon past the little village of 
Stanbridge, the pretty church of which was struck by 
lightning on the following Saturday. 

Between the seventh and eighth milestones from Wim- 
bome is the entrance to St. Giles' Park (Lord Shaftesbury's), 
and finding the gate open, figuratively and literally, I left 
the Cranbome Road, which here turns sharply to the right, 
and resolved to cut across the country by another route 
which I had heard highly spoken of. After a pleasant run 
of nearly a mile across the park — the house being on my 
left — I came to another entrance, where a little iron erection 
does duty as a lodge. Then turning to the right I rode up 
a lane for about a mile to a cross road, learning from some 
masons as I went that it was ''better than 12 mile" to 
Salisbury, the value of which information will be sub- 
sequently apparent. At the cross a sign-post directed me 
to take the left-hand road for Woodyates and Salisbury," 
which I accordingly did, and shortly, to my great satis- 
faction, emerged on the open Downs. 

The ominous cloud was now crossing my path far ahead, 
and in a fair way to trouble me no longer ; the air was full 
of the scent of clover and wild thyme ; the wind, though 
now slightly against me, delicious and invigorating, and the 
surface (chalk and flint until close to Salisbury) excellent. 
After a while I passed a gamekeeper who told me it was 
" sixteen mile " to Salisbury, and that after I had heard 
two miles back it was twelve ! Soon after parting with this 
worthy I came to a road cutting mine at right angles, and 
was puzzled for a minute or so, as there was no sign-post 



at the comer, and the last had distinctly stated that I was 
right for "Woodyates and Salisbury." I made up my 
mind, however, to try, and, turning the comer, was soon 
flying down a long and tolerably steep descent with the 
wind behind me. A youngster at the side of the road set 
my doubts at rest, and I found by the milestones that I 
had stmck the Blandford and Salisbury road at about 12} 
miles firom the latter place. I had been over the same road 
many years ago, by coach, and it was strange how some 
parts that I afterwards came to seemed to have been 
photographed on my memory. 

Had I followed my former course, I should have crossed 
Cranbome Chase, and eventually arrived at Shaftesbury- 
The Chase is, I believe, well worth a visit, though suffi- 
ciently hilly ; indeed, I heard something about a " zigzag" 
on the other side of it. " Woodyates Inn," an important 
place in coaching days, has lately [been made into a private 
house, but I got a glass of milk in the village, and resumed 
my journey. Before long a clump of trees, out of which 
peeped a church spire, came into sight about two miles 
to the right of the road, and I suddenly remembered that 
the village was Marten, an old acquaintance of mine, and 
a place I can confidently recommend to the notice of any 
one who wishes to retire from the world. In my boyish 
days, a stream used to flow down the main street, and on 
Sundays, service was performed in the church with the 
aid of a fine specimen of the village band. The road- 
way has been improved, I hear, and I dare say the 
band has been abolished, but as an agricultural village 
pure and simple, I will back Marten against most, 
and since the discontinuance of coaching it must be more 
out of the world than ever. The road still rose and dipped, 
but the main set of the country was always uphill, until at 
last Salisbury spire came in sight. The view, which had 
been expanding as I rose, was superb when I topped this 
highest ridge, between the sixth and fifth milestones from 
Salisbury. In front, the eye overleaped the city and river 
valley, and ranged far into the Plain and Hampshire Downs. 
On the right hand the Isle of Wight (though close upon 30 
miles distant) and ChriBtchurch'^^Church seemed near at 
hand, further to the right came Wallacedown Church, near 
Bournemouth, then the Purbeck Hills, even the top of the 
cliff in which they break off seawards being visible. Behind 
me lay the hills towards Dorchester, and nearer at hand, 
on the left, the great rolling ridge which bounds to the 
north-west the elevated district through which I was passing. 
Biding on I came, at the fifth milestone from Salisbury, to 
a winding hollow in the Downs, which the road descends ; 
and my recollections being to the effect that the hill was 
steep and long, I applied my eccentric and began with 
becoming caution. The descent was not so bad as I 
thought, but rather loose, and as the road twists a good 
deal, a little caxe will not be misplaced on it. I had again 
to notice what I had remarked years ago. At the top of 



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the ridge before spoken of, Salisbury seem^ close to you ; 
you descend the hill, the road shoots off in a different 
direction, and you seem -as far from your destination as 
ever. Jos. C. Eetnes. 

(To be continued.) 

SITTINGBOURNE ACCIDENT. 
We are glad to hear a somewhat more favourable account 
of the condition of Mr. Whitehead, who was, as our readers 
probably know, one of the sufferers in the above accident. 

RACING FIXTURES. 

Sept. lith. — Civil Service Bicycle Club. Stamford Bridge. 
Two Miles Handicap (Open). Racing to 
commence at 2.30 p.m. Tickets at half-price 
can] be procured from the Captain or Hon. 
Sec. 

Sept. 38th. — ^Beckenham Bicycle Club, Beckenham Cricket 
Ground — splendid grass course. Two miles 
Open Handicap. M. D. Rucker, Jun., Handi- 
capper. Entries (28. 6d.) close Wednesday, 
September 18th, to C. F. Maltby, Clarence 
House, Coper's Cope Road, Beckeuham. 

Sept. 28tL — Surrey Bicycle Club. Eennington Oval. 
Two Miles Handicap and Ten Miles Level 
Race. Entries (2& 6d. each event) close 
Saturday morning, September 2l8t, to T. C. 
Budd, 2, The Terrace, Barnes. Racing to 
commence at 3 p.m. 

Sept. 23rd. — Amateur Handicap. Lillie Bridge. Entries 
(2s. 6d.) close September 15th, to the pro- 
moter, John Keen, Bicycle Works, Clapham 
Junction. 

Oct. 26th.— Inter-Club Races C.U.Bi.a v. L.B.C. One, 
four, and fifteen miles. Cambridge Ground. 

SATURDAY MEETS.— S.E. Disteict. 
Septehbeb 14th. 
(Troydon Division.— Central Croydon Station, 4.0 p.m.| 
for Leatherhead. 

Blackheath Division.— Foot of College Park Hill, 
Lewiaham, 3.30 p.m., for Westerham. 
Seftbmber 2 1 ST. 
Croydon Division. — Central Croydon Station, 3.45 p.m., 
for Famingham. Meet Blackheath Division at "Bell," 
Bromley. 

Blackheath Division. — Foot of GoU^e Park Hill, 
Lewisham, at 3.45 p.m., for Famingham. Meet Croydon 
Division at " BeU," Bromley. 

Seftembeb 28th. 
Croydon Division.— Central Croydon Station, at 8.45 
p.m., for Godstone. Meet Blackheath Division. 

Blackheath Division. —Foot of College Park Hill, Lewis- 
ham, at 3.30 p.m., for Godstone. Meet Croydon Division. 



Western District Ruks for Sefteicbxr. 
14th— Weybridge, vid Moulsey and Walton. 
2l5t — Mickleham, vid Leatherhead. 
28th — Black Park, Langley, vid Drajrton Green. 
On October 12th (full moon) a party will ride to Peters- 
field (for Stonor Hill) by the direct Portsmouth road, over 
Hind Head, etc., returning over splendid roads the following 
day. I shall be glad to receive names of members wishing 
to join tiie trip. 

W. A. Smith, District Gaptam* 

THE CAMBRIDGE CHALLENGE. 
We understand that some of the members intend to 
ride to Cambridge on the morning of the 26th October. 

(!EorreBjr0nbtttce. 

STOCKING SUSPENDERS. 
To the Editors of the London Bicycle Club Gazette. 
Dear Sirs, — Aa the result of a letter which appeared 
under the above heading in No. 23 of our Gazbttb, several 
members have inquired where the articles can be obtained. 
Messrs. Goy have, with their usual enterprise, procured a 
stock for bicyclists. Those with the waistbelts are sold at 
3s. per pair, and those to fasten on to a button attached to 
the breeches, which are quite as good, are only Is. 6d. 
This is slightly more than the cost of garters, but the 
increase of comfort, to say nothing of appearance, is well 
worth paying for. When others have tried them they 
might give their opinions, which I feel sure would be in 
£Bkvour of Suspenders. 

ANSWERS TO CORRESPONDENTS. 

ZoE. — ^Ladies' Challenge Prize. Tour suggestion has 
been forwarded to the proper official quarter. 

L. — Certainly not. 

SiOMA.— We must again regret our Gazette is so small 
that we have no room for such dangerous e2[plo8ive8 as 
petty personal attacks. 

0. P.— Next week. 

X T Z. — ^Pray send the account of your tour as you 
suggest. 

Our readers will notice that Mr. W. A. Smith has under- 
taken the considerable labour of indexing the Club minute 
book, which by this time is rather a formidable voluma 
This instance of Mr. Smith's goodwill increases our regret 
that a somewhat weak and silly efifusion should have found 
its way into our columns a few weeks back. Any man 
with a moderate talent in spelling can write flippant attacks 
on public characters, but it is not everyone who would 
receive them in the same generous spirit as the above- 
named gentleman. 

Ode to a Biotclb.— For "angiy" substitute "threatening" 
in sixth stanza. 



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TRICYCLES for Ladies or Gentlemen. 
YOUTHS' BICYCLE S. 

GOY'S CLUB ROOM, 

HOST CENTBALLT SirUATID. 

Offered FREE to Officers of all Clubs to arrange Matches, 
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A KEAL BOOH TO BICTCLI8T8. 

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CHAMPlOy OByAMENTAL BIDBB. ^__ 

THE EMPRESS 

Is acknowledged as the best Roadster. Strong, durable, and easy run- 
ning. Always gives satisfaction. Strongly recommended by members 
of London Bicycle and other Clubs. 

Sole Agent: T. A. 8M ILY, DA ISTOH JTJirCTIOV, E. 

THE NORWOOD. 

A newly-designed light Roadster. A very elegant machine. Will 
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§{ 54, LIME STREET , | London, B.t. 

W.KEEQf, EmpreMBicyole Works, Korwood Junction, S.E. 
Price Lists, One Stamp. 



THE BICYCLE OF THE DAY FOR 1878 IS J. STASSEN'S " NONPAREIL" 

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repairs and never get out of order, and are strongly recommended by 
Members of the London Bicycle Club, and by all who have used them. 
Weight of machine, from 40 lb. or from 1 lb. per inch. 

City Agent: GOT, 21. leadenliall Street. 
PEAKES, Pnnees S treet, Leicester Sqnare, London, W. 

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Faotobt EKTBAifoB : BEAUMONT PLACE. 
Prospectus Id., with Photo. 3d. All sizes kept in stock ready for delivery. 

T. A. 8MILY, DALSTON JUNCTION, LONDON, 

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Specially adai)ted for Travellers (commercial and others) and Touriste. 

Price lists of these and other Bicycles, post free. 

Photos of "Traveller ** No. 1 Bicycle, and of John Keen, poet free on 

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roller of which is warranted to tighten equally towuds the centre. 

For further particulars apply to tne Manufacturer, 

B. C^A1V]>£R, Bnrlneer, AI.BRT IfTORKS, 

LITTLE GOWER PLACE, HUSTON ROAD, N.W. 

(One minute's walk from Gower Street Station.) 

Biqfda of all lands JUpaired on the thorUst notice, 

IMPORTANT TO ALL. 
EABJLISOir'S AETI-COKKOSITE PASTE, 

for Preventing Rust, 6d., Is., and Is. 9d. 

HAB&ISOK'S P0LI8HIHG POWBEB 

instantly removes Rust and Corrosion from Metals, and for Polishing 
Glassy 6d., Is., and Is. 9d. (see advertisement in "Bicycling Times.'*) 

Free by poet for 8, 14, and 24 stamps, of 

BHIETCLiyF k CO., 66, Qoldhawk Boad, ghgpheraa Bnih, London, W. 

THE 

GREAT WESTERN BICYCLE DEPOT, 

87, PEAED STREET, 

PADDINGTON, W. 

( Three minutes' walk from Great Western and Praed Street 
Railway Stations,) 

PBOFBISrOBS : 

CROOKE & CO., 

AGENTS FOB ALL FIBST-CLASS BICYCLES 
AND TBICYCLES. 



BICYCLES BOUGHT, SOLD, OR EXCHANGED. 

BICYCLES LET ON HIRE. 

Repairs promptly executed by competent Workmen. 

CHAHGES MODEBATE. 

BICYCLE SUNDRIES OF EVERY DESCRIPTION. 



Price Lists on Application. 

Within three minutes* walk oj Edgware Poad, Praed Street 

(Metropolitan), and Great Western Railway Stations, 
London, 1878. 



Printed for the Proprietors by Babliko & Son, at the Minerva Steam 
Printing Office, 36, Eastcheap, London, E.C.— Sept 12, 1878. 



Coogte" 



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' T engage done torn d, foiter dans leur$ ecriis taute personnalit^, taute allusion d^ssant lee Umites de la discussion la 

plus sindre et la plus courtoise" — ^Laboulbbne. 



Vol. I. No. 26.] 



Edited by A. 0. WARD & J. S. STOKES. [Thumdat, Sept. 19, 1878. 



CONTENTS. 



Saturday Runs 176 

Mr. Thom'a Bide to the North 177 

Chatham to Margate 178 

Ealing to Chippenham 178 

An Enjoyable Ride 179 

A Vifidt to Nottingham 179 

Rambles from Wimbome Minster (Concluded) 180 



PAOB 

Ealing to Frithsden -- 180 

XJpchurch Marsh 181 

Civil Service Bicycle Club Handicaps 1^1 

London to Bath and Back 181 

Swimmins; 182 

Saturday Meets 182 

Racing Fixtures 182 



Members will have learned, we are sure with regret, of 
Mr. Hutchings's resignation. At present the office of 
Secretary is vacant, but Mr. Riicker has most generously 
added its duties to his already heavily burdened shoulders. 
We, therefore, take this opportunity of asking members to 
remember that Mr. Kiicker has his regular business to 
attend to as well as Club matters, and to refrain from con- 
stantly calling to see him upon matters, often very trivial, 
at all hours of the day. Mr. Hutchings, having resigned, 
expressed his opinion that, for an amateur club devoted to 
athletics, there was far too much correspondence with the 
Secretary. The post of Honorary Secretary to any club is 
sure to be a tax upon a man's time, and members should 
bear this in mind, and only write upon really necessary 
matters. Half the questions which Mr. Riicker and the 
Secretary are called upon to reply to are such as have been 
already answered to other members ; and if men would 
only write to the Gazette they would both themselves be 
answered officially, by our reference to the Captain or 
Secretary, and, by the reply appearing in the Club paper, 
very probably solve the doubts of a score of their fellow 
members. 



Castle" and "Princess Alice," at Stamford Bridge or 
Kennington Oval, on the first available Saturday afternoon. 
The programme to include a One and a Three Miles 
Handicap, and a Five Miles Scratch Race. Thiee small 
medals to be given in each handicap, and one in the scratch 
race. Entrance fee 2s. 6d. each event. A band will be in 
attendance. Mr. Rucker will act as handicapper. All 
further particulars will appear in our next issue. 

It is hoped, when all the arrangements are made, every 
member will do all in his power to further the success of 
such a laudable object, which cannot fail to raise bicyclists 
in the estimation of the outside public. 



A committee, composed chiefly of racing members be- 
longing to the principal Metropolitan Clubs, has been 
formed, and a meeting was held on Tuesday evening, the 
chair being occupied by Mr. Rucker. 

It was resolved to hold a race meeting in aid of the 
sufferers by the late fearful collision between the "By well 



SATURDAY RUNS. 
N.W. District. 
It says something for the regularity with which our 
District Captain performs his duties, that those members 
who met at "Jack Straw's Castle " should wait half an 
hour in expectation of seeing his well-known form ascending 
the hill, for, argued they, " He is sure to come." And so 
he did, but being late he came by the shorter route over 
Highgate Hill, and arrived at Tally Ho five minutes before 
the main body. It was a goodly muster which hove in 
sight, headed by McCullum's "renegade," and the total 
muster amounted to twelve with the addition of a visitor, 
who was awaiting us at Shenley. The roads were generally 
in good order, although some of the hiUs were a little loose. 
Tea was obtained at the " Black Lion." Present : Messrs. 



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Alison^ Bacon, Butler, Freetli, Marchant, N. B. Morrig, 
Newman, Sewell, Sharp, Tegetmeier, and two visitors. 

K Teoetmbibb. 

P.S. — ^The run next Saturday is to Little Berkhampstead. 



N.E. District. 



One member rode to the meeting place, and, having given 
twenty minutes' grace, started down the Lea Bridge Road ; 
he met another member at Sybom's Corner, and they took 
a short ride together. Coming up to Whip's Cross, they 
went througl) Suaresbrook and along the Chigwell Road, 
and made a round by Chigwell, and back to tea at 
Woodford with some mutual friends. The roads were in 
first-rate condition, and it seems a pity so many who used 
to ride with us last season have so much deserted their 
bicycles or their district meets. I have not had reports 
of runs for the past three weeks, when I was away, and 
know, for three or four weeks before that, that no members 
came to the runs. If the destination for next Saturday is 
not published in the Gazette, I hope members will turn up 
at 3.30, and we can then decide where to ride. Present 
on Saturday : Theo. Godlee, and Francis Godlee, District 
Captain. 



Western District. 



This run failed to induce anyone to turn up at Eew 
Green, the District Captain, tlierefore, religiously went 
over the course to Weybridge, etc., solus, afterwards riding 
on to Ripley and back. Distance 46| miles. 

W. A. Smith, Dist. Capt. 

A member of this Division rode 242f miles last week, 
and commenced the present one with 120| miles, the latter 
distance being covered (including stoppages for refresh- 
ment) under 10^ hours. What distance have Messrs. 
Freetli and Bacon accomplished during the same time I 



S.E. DisTRioT— Crotdon Division. 

Three members only were at head-quarters at four 
on Saturday. They waited till 4.12, and then started 
for Leatherhead. At Waddon they passed Potter going 
in an opposite direction. The roads were in a very 
enjoyable state, and on arriving at Leatherhead, as no one 
was to be seen, it was decided to run on to Ockham, which 
place was reached at 6.15. Having visited the country 
seat of two well-known members, they went to the 
" Hautboy," where, disposing of tea, they started at 
8 p.m., arriving at Croydon, after a splendid moonlight 
run, at 9.15. Present: A. Bishop, 0. H. Bishop, F. M. 
Williams. 



MR. THORN'S RffiE TO THE NORTH. 
Mr. Thorn started for Scotland on Saturday last. He 
mounted as the clock chimed midnight, and was accom- 
panied by Mr. Cleaver as far as Finchley Road. 

Mr. Thorn seemed very fit. He carried with him a.heavy 
M.LP. We leave him to tell his tale in his own words : — 

Doncaster, Sept. 16th. 

After I left Cleaver I put on the pace, and arrived at 
Baruet (11 miles) at quarter to one; did not stop, but 
pushed on to Hatfield (20) just as the clock struck two. 
I dismounted on railway bridge outside town to oil up 
(four minutes), and then on again to Welwyn (25), 
2.30 a.m. ; beautiful roads, but moon did not come out 
much. Arrived at Stennage 3.10, and rode straight on 
through Baldock to Biggleswade (45). At 4.13 I stopped 
to look at maps, etc., and oil on railway bridge (ten 
minutes). Mounted, and through Sandy Tempsford to 
Eaton Socon, and here I saw an old man who told me 
where I was, as I had quite lost my reckoning (55 miles, 
5 a.m.) Still on, through Little Paxton, Buckden, 
Alcronbury, and Stilton (75 miles, 6.40.) No place open, 
so rode straight on without dismounting to Water Newton, 
where I had two glasses of milk given me (seven minutes 
stop), and then rode into Wandsford, and on to Stamford 
(89), 8.15 a.m. Had a good breakfast, and started again, 
nine o'clock, through Clipsham, and did the 100 miles in 
9 hours 45 minutes. (Road from Stamford to Toxford 
frightful, being very loose, and great boulders sticking up, 
the previous rains having washed the roads down to the 
foundation.) 

Wind got up about 10 a.m. from W. and S.W., and 
increased all day, mostly blowing sideways. Then rode on 
to Grantham down very steep hill (110), 10.15 ; had 
another breakfast, and started at 11 ; rode up stiff hill out 
of other side of town. The only hill I did not ride was 
one through Stamford (89), as I had dismounted for first 
breakfast. On to Newark at 12.10 (124 miles) ; started at 
12.30 ; had a good drink, and on to Tuxford (137 miles), 
1.30 ; roads better ; wind blowing a storm sideways. Had 
dinner with a friend at Tuxford (Bruce's brother-in-law), 
and started again at 3 p.m. Rode through Retford (3.30), 
Bawtry (153), 4.20; had a drink, and on to Doncaster 
(162), 5.10 p.m. 

Had got three miles out of town, feeling very well, and in 
good time for the last 35 miles (for wbicli I felt very fit, 
and confident I could do it), when the felloe of bicycle 
broke in half, and I had to walk back to Doncaster. 

Booked machine to Humber s, and telegraphed for 
another. 

13hrs.30mins.riding | i .^ . .. « ., 

3,. 40 „ stoppages /-="^"^l«°^^f°'^«5""'^^'- 

I expect a bicycle by 12 noon to-day. 

If machine comes soon, I shall try and get on to Durham 
to-day. 



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178 



CHATHAM TO MARGATE. 

On Friday afternoon, the 26th July, I took train from 
Victoria to Chatham, and, after walking up the most 
stupendous hill in Kent, I bicycled to Paversham, where, 
thanks to the recommendation of a local bicyclist, I stayed 
for the night at the " Dolphin," and there had an excellent 
tea and a bed for 3s., exclusive of a trifle for boots. 

Leaving Paversham at seven the next morning, I pushed 
on to Canterbury ; but the hills, somehow or another, at 
this part seemed much more steep than when I went over 
them three years ago. The views about here are surpassingly 
beautiful, and, although the roads were heavily laden with 
dust, and the heat was intense, I found the ride an enjoy- 
able one. Arriving at Canterbury, I discussed a substantial 
breakfast at the *' Fleur-de-Lis," and, having strolled about 
the city for an hour or so, set out for the remainder of my 
journey. The road from Canterbury to Margate being, 
with tlie exception of one short steep hill, as good as a 
bicyclist can wish for, I soon reached my destination, and 
in a few minutes afterwards was revelling in the enjoyment 
of a delicious plunge into the bosom of the mighty deep. 

On Bank Holiday I rode over to Canterbury, intending 
to take part in the parade of Kentish and other bicycle 
clubs, but unfortunately reached the place too late to join 
the procession ; so I betook myself to the Cricket Ground, 
and there, in the match between Kent and All England, 
saw some of the finest fielding ever witnessed. In returning 
to Margate I had to face an adverse wind, which tried my 
strength to the utmost. H. J. H. 



EALING TO CHIPPENHAM. 
I left home on the morning of the 2nd September with 
the intention of going to Bath. As I was alone, and am 
usually rather a dawdler on the road when unstimulated 
by the presence of a friend, I decided to go only as far as 
}f ewbury on the first day. The weather was fine, and I 
\et out with a light heart, driving through Hanwell, which 
ust now has the reputation of possessing the worst turnpike 
•oad within 20 miles of London. Passing the asylum, I 
iirned off from the main road, through Norwood and 
leston, which, as most of our Western men are aware, 
.ffords a capital run to Cranford Bridge. I pulled up at 
Jolubrook to get some lemonade ; and happening to men- 
ion to a friendly and intelligent, but extremely loquacious 
tomersetshire labourer, that I waa bound for Bath, he at 
nee favoured me with an, in more senses than one, exhaus- 
ive description of the various routes, recommending the 
devizes road above all others. I patiently bore with his 
I terminable harangue until I could stand it no longer, 
len, mounting my Stassen, hurried off, leaving him 
inning on like an old Dutch clock, quite unable to stop 
is tongue when once it had been set going upon a favourite 
leme. Between Cranford and Maidenhead the roads 
ere^ after the then recent rain, anything but good ; in some 



spots I had to pick my way with a caution that rendered 
swift riding an impossibility. From Maidenhead to New- 
bury the roads are in splendid condition ; indeed I never 
wish to meet with anything better. When near Theale I 
was fortunate enough to meet with a bicyclist residing in 
that district ; and as he was good enough to .accompany 
me for about 10 miles, I found his intelligent conversation 
made a pleasant break in a rather. monotonous journey. 

Acting upon the suggestion of a local policeman, I put 
up at a second-rate hotel at Newbury, where I was so 
worried with fleas during the night that I could obtain 
scarcely a wink of sleep. Lord Beaconsfield once said that 
our National Debt was *' onlif a fleabite." I confess I 
cannot regard with quite so much complacency the appli- 
cation of the suctorial beak of this diminutive tormentor. 

I bathed both night and morning in a stream from the 
Rennet, which is fenced in, its depth graduated, and made 
perfectly safe by the Corporation of Newbury. It would 
be well if other local bodies were equally considerate of 
the health and enjoyment of those who are fond of a good 
swim. The loss of 630 poor souls from the "Princess 
Alice " ought to rouse the nation to the necessity of giving 
all classes the opportunity of learning the art of natation. 
The universal knowledge of swimming would have rendered 
such a dire calamity almost impossible. 

I attended the Monday evening service in the recently 
restored parish church of St. Nicholas, Newbury ; and on 
expressing my admiration of the rich, yet ch^te and 
subdued painting of the chancel walls, was informed that 
the colours were believed to be exactly similar to those 
which had been employed in beautifying the church several 
centuries ago. 

Leaving Newbury about 8.30 the next morning, I bent 
my way to Hungerford, Marlboro', and Chippenham, and 
was somewhat surprised to find that so many stiff hills had 
to be surmounted, London to Bath being popularly regarded 
as rather a level ride. Tho harvest operations were in full 
swing, and, so far as I can form an opinion upon agricultural 
matters, I am inclined to think tliat scientific farming, 
with the use of all the latest appliances, obtains to a much 
greater extent in Somersetshire than in the home counties. 
I arrived at Chippenham in time to return to London by 
the afternoon express. As I had strained a tendon in my 
right leg I thought it prudent to give the limb a day's 
rest, so I returned home for that purpose. 

It is customary to regard the bugle with scornful derision. 
Now I have, tried bells and gongs, and the shrillest of 
whistles to clear the road ; but I find from experience that 
there is nothing like a musical blast from a military bugle 
to rouse the attention of sleepy drivers who are blocking 
up the best part of the road. Herds of cattle and flocks 
of sheep can often be passed without the bicyclist being 
under the necessity of dismounting, if a timely turn is given 
on the bugle for the edification of the drovers. H. J. H. 



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LONDON BICYCLE CLUB GAZETTE. 



AN ENJOYABLE RIDE. 

With Salter, of the Stanley B.C., I left Chalk Farm, on 
Wednesday, September 11th, 6.0 a.m., for a ride to Cam- 
bridge and back. 

In splendid weather we jogged along merrily through 
Bamet, Hatfield, Welwyn (turning off to the right here), 
Stevenage, Baldock, Royston, Trumpington, arriving in 
Cambridge at 12.30 p.m. Dined at the " Bull," very good, 
but expensive. Hemounting at 2.30, we decided to return 
via the Essex route, through Stapleford, Great Chesterford, 
Newport, Hockeril, Sawbridgeworth, Harlow, Epping, and 
Woodford. Prom here we had to walk through a heavy 
mist nearly to the ferry boat at Tottenham, thence by 
Seven Sisters' Road, arriving home safely at 12 p.m. 
Every hill was ridden bar one outside Welwyn, the surface 
being too loose to be safe. On the whole the roads were 
excellent, and should anyone be desirous of a long and 
pleasant ride, I can safely recommend this journey. Dis- 
tance 118 miles. 

W. Btobotjghs. 



A VISIT TO NOTTINGHAM. 

No doubt but few of our members have ever seen 
an important Amateur Bicycle Handicap far north of 
London. Until the last few days I myself was amongst 
the number, but having received a pressing invitation 
from the Captain of the Nottingham Amateur Bicycle 
Club, I determined to remain in ignorance no longer. I 
arrived in Nottingham on Friday night, but, as my friend 
was in training for the race, saw nothing of the town until 
the following day. The morning was principally spent in 
Messrs. Humberts and Carver's factories, and those who have 
a taste for engineering, and wish to go through the various 
shops, must be prepared to devote at least one morning to 
this object. Humber's was the first inspected. There you 
could follow a machine from the forging of the rough steel 
and iron through every stage, to the burnishing or the 
japanning room. The machinery used is most perfect, the 
whole being driven by a steam-engine built by Humber 
himself Each man has his distinct part of a bicycle to 
make, one doing nothing but turn balls for the bearings, 
another making the fork, another the spokes, others trueing 
the wheel, and so on. In this way perfect order is preserved 
in the shop. I saw there a new tricycle propelled by 
treadles rotating in the same way as those of a bicycle, 
which are connected with the axle of two 60-inch wheels 
by means of chains and cogwheels, and wonderful things are 
expected to be done with it. I heard afterwards that 
F. T. East, of the Surrey, was going to ride one in Keen's 
tricycle race in October. 

Messrs. Carver's premises cover an immense area of 
ground, and there would be ample room for the whole 
bicycling trade of England to be conducted there were the 
whole of the premises to be used for this purpose. 



By far the largest part, however, is used in the manu- 
facture of lace-making machinery. We were shown round 
the shops by Mr. Caifver, Mr. Law, his manager, and Golland, 
the professional rider, and foreman of the bicycle branch. 
No pains were spared by either in explaining every detail, 
and upon my inquiring what would be the result of a hollow 
spoke wheel buckling, the affable proprietor volunteered to 
buckle one so that I could see for myself. Upon my 
objecting to his running the risk of spoiling the wheel, he 
replied, " Oh, there are plenty more outside," whereupon 
one edge of the rim was placed on a bench, the other 
resting on the ground ; two men then jumped on the centre 
but could not succeed in buckling it ; the services of a third 
were called, and their united weight at last had the desired 
effect, but the force required was so great that two of the 
spokes were drawn from the rim. It was at once proposed 
to try another, but this we would not allow. Another 
curious tricycle was also seen here, which can be worked by 
hands and feet and is steered by the back. This also 
will be ridden at Lillie Bridge, I believe. 

After receiving an invitation from Mr. Carver to stay and 
go for a few days' shooting over his land, we left highly 
pleased with our visit. 

The whole afternoon was spent in witnessing the prelimi- 
nary heats of the handicap, but as few of the riders have 
ever competed down south, a detailed account would not 
interest our readers. East was the only competitor from 
London, and he, with 30 yards start from an imaginary 
scratch man, was put out in the first round by my friend 
Mr. S. H. Lambert, the Nottingham Captain, who rode in 
excellent form and very gamely. East, of whom great 
things were expected by the Northerners, was unfortunately 
not in form, and could not, with his start, do better than 
3 mins. 2f sees. 

It is strange that riders with great reputation in the 
North seldom do well in London, and the London cracks 
are almost invariably defeated in the country. The class 
of amateurs who competed could scarcely be termed select 
The majority were working men, and a gentleman was an 
exception. On Monday, when the finals were run, there 
was plenty of betting going on, and one unfortunate 
incident was attributed by some to its evil influence. In 
the final heat, as the men were turning into the straight, a 
man deliberately ran across the course, by which act the 
second man narrowly escaped a spill, and the third man 
coming into contact with him, was thrown with great force. 
The man was not hurt by being run into, but he was very 
roughly handled by the spectators, who could discern 
between a premeditated act and an accident. The result 
of the final proves that there are men in the North who 
could make the Southerners run, if they could be persuaded 
to ride for the honour of winning the amateur champion- 
ships, but I fear that, for the majority, valuable pots have a 
greater attraction. 



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180 



T. Chambers, of Lincoln, with 120 yards, came in first, 
in 2 mins. 54 sees. ; W. Wood, of Whitwick, 110, second, 
ten yards behind ; G. A. Mitcheson, of Stoke, 85, third ; 
G. Radford, of Mansfield, 160, fourth, and 0. G. Goodman, 
of Birmingham, 105, thrown. 

Nottingham is at any time well worth a visit, and I have 
been authorised by my friend to state that he will be glad 
to meet any L.B.G. man visiting the town, and to show him 
the various places of interest in the neighbourhood. I can 
affirm, from experience, that anyone so doing will be right 
well received. The remarks above; as to the class of 
amateurs who competed in the handicap, do not apply to 
the members of the Club of which Mr. Lambert is captain. 
They are most careful to keep their Club select. 

I hope that other L.B.C. men staying in the town may 
have as pleasant recollections of the place and inhabitants 
as I have. M. D. Euceer, Jun. 



RAMBLES FROM WIMBORNE MINSTER. 
(Concluded). 
Passing through the pretty village of Combe Bisset, 
I took the right hand turning at the turnpike, and was 
soon in sight of what must have been intended for a 
practical joke on the part of the planner of the road, 
viz., a climb up, frightful to look at (Harnham Hill), 
followed, I knew, by a worse descent on the other side. 
Some wiser individual, however, subsequently conceived 
the bright idea of carrying the road round the hill instead 
of over it, and so I was spared the trouble of pushing my 
machine up one precipice for the sake of pulling it back on 
another. As it is, the gradient past the Union is quite 
steep enough, and the surface being good would afford a 
magnificent run down but for its winding too much, and 
for the fact that a right angle to the left must be turned 
into the Ringwood Road at the bottom. I greatly feared 
I had kept poor dear Buckler running up his distance in 
the market place ; however, as I arrived there from one 
street he rode in from another, having come from Basing- 
stoke that morning. We greeted one another fraternally, 
greatly edifying a few bystanders, and at once proceeded 
to cement our friendship and order lunch. The dis- 
tance from Wimborne was, as nearly as I could make 
it, 25 miles, and the ride altogether most enjoyable and 
interesting, but I should recommend no one to try it 
with a foul wind, or in bad weather, as shelter is scarce. 
Having ordered our lunch, we visited the cathedral, which 
was new to Buckler. The frescoes, pavement, and some* 
what gaudy screen of the choir seem to me hardly in 
keeping with the unadorned beauty of the architecture. 
The paintings also, in my opinion, diminish the apparent 
height of the roof. If you criticise, the verger tells you 
that frescoes were used originally, but I cannot help think- 
ing the effect unsatisfactory. Having had a good and 
reasonably- priced meal at the shop of Ward the pastrycook 



(he calls his place the "Cathedral Private Hotel"), we 
started for Ringwood (18), via Downton and Fordingbridge- 
This route, though pretty enough, is rather tame after 
what I had passed over in the morning. The road is after 
about four miles very good going, and almost a dead level, 
following the Avon valley the whole distance. Ringwood 
reached, we had to ride into the eye of a tolerably 
strong wind, 9^ miles to Wimborne. Surface sand and 
gravel, good for about 4 miles, then rather loose for 3}, 
then first-rate into Wimborne, several inclines, but no hills 
worth troubling about. This tract of country, generally 
tame and dull, derives at this season a peculiar beauty from 
the heather, which I do not remember ever to have seen so 
richly in bloom. The sides of the shallow cuttings through 
which the road occasionally passes are lined with it, and 
the pine woods on either hand carpeted with its bright 
purple. Anyone who wants a cheap house might, I should 
think, get one of two that some lunatic has built in the 
heath, halfway between the two towns, at a very low figure. 
I don't fancy anyone has "resided" in them since their 
erection. When I passed that way between 10 and 11 p.m. 
at Whitsuntide, there was a light in one winddw that 
strongly suggested ghosts, but I afterwards learnt that one 
house was used as a laundry, so my romantic ideas were 
somewhat rudely dispelled. Reaching Wimborne in safety, 
we finished the day's proceedings in a highly satisfactory 
manner. 

Jos. C. Eetnes. 



EALING TO PRITHSDEN. 

On Thursday, the 5th September, I left Castle Hill, and 
wended my* way up Hanger Hill, through Sudbury, past 
Harrow Station, and on to Watford, where I rested for an 
hour at the " Essex Arms," to read the papers, discuss a 
sandwich, and quaff some lemonade and water (alcohol I 
invariably shun) ; thence to Berkhampstead, where I turned 
off from the main road, and, crossing the Common, found 
myself at Frithsden — as charming and romantic a spot as 
the lovers of rural beauty can desire to see. After taking 
dinner and tea with some hospitable friends, I left Frithsden 
at 5.30, and returned to Watford via Hemel Hempstead — 
a down hill run of about 11 miles. From Watford to Ealing 
my journey was anything but pleasant : I had no lamp ; 
my bell got unfixed ; and, although the moon, " the incon- 
stant moon," as fair Juliet described it, was good enough 
to light me on the road for a mile or so, it suddenly went 
behind some thick clouds, and for the rest of my journey I 
was almost in total darkness. Not being used to night- 
riding, and having neither companion nor lamp, I certainly 
was very glad to reach Ealing in safety. Riding by moon- 
light is, I believe, infinitely preferable to day-riding ; as a 
bicyclist scarcely feels any sense of fatigue at night, when 
the air is cool and refreshing, and the roads are free from 
traffic ; but a companion is indispensable to one's comfort. 



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LONDON BICYCLE CLUB GAZETTE. 



unless the rider is thoroughly acquainted with the roads, 
and can see well before him. 

Your readers will observe that I have not noted the time 
taken to ride from one place to another. At my best I go 
about 12 miles an hour ; but then I am fond of loitering at 
any pleasant village green, or other attractive spot, and 
consequently rarely cover more than 60 or 70 miles in a 
day; while more than one L.B.C. would double that 

distance with scarcely an effort. 

H. J. H. 



UPCHURCH MARSH. 



With a very etiflf wind behind us — or on the starboard 
quarter rather — Turner, Kinder, and myself made, a few 
days ago, an expedition to the above. From Lewisham the 
distance is not great, about 35 miles, but the hilly roads 
and loose surface take a good deal out of a rider. I, at 
any rate, felt rather punished on reaching our destination. 
The spirited condition to which my District Captain has 
been brought by his recent course of high training led him 
to scorn hills, and while he was playfully trotting up those 
of Dartford, Northfleet, and Chatham, his companion toiled 
painfully in his rear. At Rainham, five miles beyond 
Chatham, we dined, then rode into the Marsh, where, to 
my great joy, a very good specimen of the Roman Upchurch 
ware was picked up, for a trifle, from a labourer who had 
found it on the side of one of the Medway creeks. We 
heard of other relics also, but did not see more. By dint 
of cunning lashing I succeeded, under cover of darkness, 
in safely carrying home my pot. Strapped firmly behind 
my left shoulder, there it rode very quietly, and seemed 
none the worse for its novel journey. The wind and dust 
had greatly increased ; the former was so high that, at times, 
we almost failed to make any progress against it, and 
Kinder, on his new machine, came, on several occasions, 
very near being driven off the road into the lee ditch. 
From Mr. Hogden, who has a small public near the 
Gibraltar, in Chatham, Turner experienced much civility, 
and obtained a saddle, having broken his own. 

Ashley Baerett. 



CIVIL SERVICE BICYCLE CLUB HANDICAPS. 



T. J. D'Olier 
E. A. Runtz 
J. P. Brittan 
W. P. English 

A. A. Weir 

C. J. Turner 
RG.Trollope 

J. Drin^ 

T. W. Howard ... 
W. T. Thorn, Jun.... 

A. P. Shaw 

E. W. P. Cambridge 

E. H. Carr 

G. R. Oxx 



1877. 


1878. 


210 


190 


260 


130 


300 


200 


240 


210 


60 


20 


235 


130 


150 


100 


210 


160 


260 


200 


230 


70 


160 


200 


220 


60 


230 


190 


230 


230 



LONDON TO BATH AND BACK 

225 MILES IK 29^ HOVBS. 

The following particulars may be interesting. I hear, 
however, that from the Marble Arch to Bath and back 
has been accomplished in 23 hours, 50 minutes; if this 
be so, it is truly a wonderful feat : — 
Our Run. 

5.45 p.m At St. Jolin's Wood, the start. 

7.85 M To Longford 1 hr. 50 mina... 



9.40 II To Beading 2 

10. M At do 

11.80 n ToNewbuiy 1 

12.15 a.m At do. 



3.40 
8.50 
5. 
5.25 
7.10 



.ToCalne 8 

..At do 

..To Ford 1 

..At do 

.To Bath 1 



5 
20 
80 
45 
25 
10 
10 
25 
45 



..18 miles 1*^ fan. 
.24 1. 4-< 



...17 .. 1-* 

!'.!81 N 

."!!lO M 5-« 

'.'.'. 9 t. 7« 



13 hrs. 25 mins. Ill miles 4'* fan. 

(Return journey over the L.B.C. Whit-Monday Course.) 

8.80 a.m. At Bath 1 hr. 20mins.... — miles — furs. 

9.80 ToTopof BoxHiU ...1 .1 n ...7 •• 4 n 

10.45 ti At do. (8eeNote7)l 11 15 n ...— — 

(The following refers to my own journey only.) 

1. 5p.m To Marlborough 2 hrs. 20 mini.... 28 miles 0** furs. 

1.45 ti At do II 40 M ... — II — 

8.25 II To Newbury 1 n 40 .• ...18 u l-« h 

4. I. At do M 85 11 ...— — 

6.85 II ToBeading In 35 u ...17 i. 1-* „ 

6.45 •• At do II 10 II ...— — - 



(The 24 hpurs journey) 

8.15 p.m To Longford 

9.15 II At do 

11.0 II To St. John's Wood 



24 hrs. Omins. 182 miles 3** fun. 
..2 I, 80 „ ...24 „ 1-* „ 

..1 II n ... — ft — 

..1 .1 45 11 ...18 ,, 8-« M 



To Bath and back... 29 hrs. 15 mins. 225 milee 0** fun^ 

Notes upon the above. 

1. Mr. Bacon and myself left St. John's Wood punctually 
at 5.45 p.m. on Tuesday evening, the 10th inst., to run to 
Bath and back as quickly as we were able, with the above 
result. The route to Longford was via West End, Warm 
Lane, Harlesden Green, Acton, Gunnersbury, Little Ealing, 
Hanwell, Heston Cranford, Harlington,andHarmondsworth. 
The main road was joined shortly before Longford, where 
a halt was made to light lamps (a shade under 10 miles per 
hour). The moonlight was magnificent the whole journey. 

2. To Reading (just upon 12 miles per hour), and there, 
whilst imbibing some cups of tea, twenty minutes slipped 
past in " no time at all." 

3. To Newbury (over 11 miles per hour), twice stopped 
by closed turnpike gates. Here, through Mr. Bacon's 
foresight, we found plenty, yet not too much, of beef tea 
ready, but we could not resist the temptation of something 
mare ; we also attended to the wants of our fiery steeds I ! 

4. To Calne (just over 9 miles per hour). Between 
Hungerford and a little past Beckhampton Corner, a 
distance of 17 miles, the hills are most decidedly against 
the rider going to Bath. Shortly after Beckhampton there 
seemed to be some magnificent down-hills to Calne and 
farther, but owing to our not knowing the roads we did 



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182 



not, I fancy, make the best use of them. They twist and 
turn a good deal, and it would have been folly to "fly 
them" in the precarious light we then had. They also 
have an unpleasant habit of ending in the towns and 
villages ; even as it was, anything in the way would have 
been far from agreeable. At Calne there is not only a good 
pump, but also a good signpost; we made use of both with 
much effect. 

5. To Ford village or hamlet (just 9 miles per hour), 
here we found we had blundered. As we left Chippenham 
(without dismounting), it struck us both at the time, 
though neither spoke, that it was curious that we should 
pass under the railway arch at the end of the town, and 
continue at right angles to the line of rail, but there was 
no one to ask the way of, no sign-post visible, and, above 
all, apparently no prominent road on our left, so we continued 
straightforward, alongside of our old friends the telegraph 
wires. Now Pickwick, where we ought to have joined the 
Corsham road, is only four miles from Chippenham, and 
when we had covered about that distance, over the by no 
means soft oolite, our thoughts almost simult-aneously 
found vent in speech, to the effect that " we believed we 
were astray." Whilst discussing this point, we discovered 
an early bird in a field close at hand, Mr. Bacon heroically 
gave chase (on foot, of course), and the result was we 
were told to take the first turn to the left, as the early 
bird feared that a track across the fields, which he pointed 
out, might be just a little too rough for us-— the cheek of 
these natives is something wonderful. A furlong farther 
brought us to Ford, a cluster of cottages, upon the direct 
Chippenham and Bristol road, and to the cross-road itself, 
a sight that filled us with dismay, so much so, that we 
gravely debated whether to proceed on to Bristol or to 
return at once ; at all events we would give no credit to 
this direction until another inquiry had been made, so 
Mr. Bacon tried to batter in a cottage door, simply because 
smoke was issuing from the chimney, but alas, in spite of 
repeated attempts, with no result. We stared at each 
other blankly and blandly, but all at once our hearts were 
rejoiced by the twittering (a fact, gentle readers) of another 
early bird, who set all our doubts at rest, and we resolved 
to make a final effort, Bath being but 10 miles off. 
(To be continued.) 

SWIMMING. 

Messrs. Cleaver, Newman, Sewell, and A. P. Stokes 
took part in the Otter S.C. 100 yards hurdle race, on 
Friday evening last. 

Sewell and Cleaver, who are both getting into their old 
form again, managed to win their heats, but Stokes and 
Newman were not so successful, although, had the former 
cleared the first hurdle instead of plunging under it, the 
result would certainly have been different. 

In the final, Sewell made a desperate race of it for 
second place, but lost by a yard, Cleaver close up. 



The Otter Swimming Club Annual Entertainment is 
fixed for October 11th, in the Marylebone Baths. Messrs. 
Cleaver, Marchant, McMillan, Newman, Riicker, Sewell, 
A. P. Stokes, Thorn, and F. M. Williams will swim v in 
the various events. 

As some of the best swimmers in London will also 
compete, the programme is sure to be an interesting one, 
and a large contingent of L.B.C. men is expected. 

Racing will commence at 7 p.m. 

SATURDAY MEETS. 
S.E. District. — Sbptembee 21st. 
Croydon Division. — Central Croydon Station, 3.45 p.m., 
for Farningham. Meet Blackheath Division at "Bell," 
Bromley. 

Blackheath Division. — Foot of College Park Hill, 
Lewisham, at 3.45 p.m., for Farningham. Meet Croydon 
Division at " Bell," Bromley. 

September 28th. 

Croydon Division.— Central Croydon Station, at 3.45 
p.m., for Godstone. Meet Blackheath Division. 

Blackheath Division. —Foot of College Park Hill, Lewis- 
ham, at 3.30 p.m., for Godstone. Meet Croydon Division. 

N.E. District. — September 21st. 
Top of Lea Bridge Road, 3.30 p.m., for Chingford. 

September 28th. 
Top of Lea Bridge Road, 3.30 p.m., for Abridge. 

Western District Runs for September. 
21st — To Little Berkhampstead, with N. W. 
28th — Black Park, Langley, via Drayton Green. 
On October 12th (full moon) a party will ride to Peters- 
field (for Stonor Hill) by the direct Portsmouth road, over 
Hind Head, etc., returning over splendid roads the following 
da3r. I shall be glad to receive names of members wishing 
to join the trip. W. A. Smith, District Captain. 

RACING FIXTURES. 

Sept. 28th. — Beckenham Bicycle Club, Beckenham Cricket 
Ground — splendid grass course. Two miles 
Open Handicap. M. D. Riicker, Jun., Haudi- 
capper. Entnes (2s. 6d.) close Wednesday, 
September 18th, to C. F. Maltby, Clarence 
House, Coper's Cope Road, Beckenham. 

Sept. 28th. — Surrey Bicycle Club. Kennington Oval. 
Two Miles Handicap and Ten Miles Level 
Race. Entries (2s. 6d. each event) close 
Saturday morning, September 21st, to T. C. 
Budd, 2, The Terrace, Barnes. Racing to 
commence at 3 p.m. 

Sept. 23rd. — ^Amateur Handicap. Lillie Bridge. Entries 
(2s. 6d.) close September 15th, to the pro- 
moter, John Keen, Bicycle Works, Clapham 
Junction. 

Oct. 5th. — One Mile Handicap, Lillie Bridge. First 
prize, New Bicycle. Entries f2s. 6d.) to be 
made before September 28tn to Messrs. 
Humber, Marriott, and Cooper, the pro- 
moters. Handicapper — Mr. M. D. Riicker, 
Jun. 

Oct. 26th.— Inter-Club Races C.U.Bi.C. v, L.B.C. One, 
four, and fifteen miles. Cambridge Ground. 



IF 



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LONDON BICYCLE CLUB GAZETTE. 



Gh O 

BICYCLE OUTFIHER, CLUB UNIFORMS, 

AND SUNDRIES. 

PU RC H AS E 

YOCB 

BICYCLE 

ON 

GOV'S NEW PLAN. 

All the Best Makes at Manufactorer's Prices. 
By arrangement with the Manufactorera orders have the same 
attention as if forwarded direct to the Works, thus saving the buyer 
a deal of trouble. 

IMMEDIATE DELIVERY. 
Write for Particulars and Price Lists. 



TRICYCLES for Ladies or Gentlemen. 
YOUTHS' BICYCLE S. 

GOV'S CLUB ROOM, 

MOST CBNTRALLT BITUATBD. 

Offered FREE to Officers of all Clubs to arrange Matches, 
Committee Meetings, &c. 




GK)T,{2i'^eg»'^4Sr*'}London, B.O. 

A SEAL BOOH TO BICYCLISTS. 

PHIVER*S EXQUISITE MANUS ALBA, 

(RSGISTKRin) 

FOR THE HANDS AND FEET. 

SraciAX. NoncB.— Owing to the grMt demand, ftiture pricee will be 6d., It., !•. 6d., Ss. 

and 21. 6d. By PMt, 8d., It. Sd.. It. 8d., Si. 3d. and Si. 9d. Sole WhoUtale Affmt, 

J, MASOir, 120. Ooldhawk Soad, Shepherd's Bush, London, W. 

' ' ' ' 1 Crooke * Co., 87, Praed-elreet, W. ; 

.; J. Bntler, 

JCeniington ; 
. FenchuTch- 

■ITVei, r..\j. ; AIIIVIISJB A0U*« vmo, v^uariiiK^^vao otouwu f m* sua wmJ Metropolitan 

lUUwajr twntorl mi of mMt ChwBliti. AOENTS WtNTBD. 

A BOON TO BICYCLISTS. 

BICYCLE RIDING TAUGHT PERFECTLY 

AT THB 

±'±' 3d BIOTOIiE SOI^OOXi . 

The largest in London. 

Sinffle Lesson, Is. 6d. Perfect Ridincr guaranteed, lOs. 

Address-CHEQUER TABD, 
OPPOSITE ALDGATE METROPOLITAN STATION, 

'ALDGATE HIGH STREET. 
Teacher-Professor T. QUINTON. 

CHAMPION OBNAMENTAL BIDSR. 

THE EMPRESS 

Is acknowledged as the best Roadster. Strong^ durable, rod easy run- 
ning. Always gives satisfaction. Strongly reconunended by members 
of London Bicycle and other Clubs. 

Sole Agent: T. A. SM ILY, DA L8T0H JUHCTIOH, E. 

THE NORWOOD. 

A newly-designed light Roadster. A very elegant machine. Will 
stand plenty of work. Weight of 62-inch, 40 lb. City Agent : 



V 



g/ 21, LEADENHALL STREET, \ r.^^„ ^r 
§t 54, LIME STREET, / liONDON, E.C. 



;.KEBH, EmpressBioyole Works, HorwoodJimction, S.E. 
Price Littt, One Stamp. 



THE BICYCLE OF THE DAY FOR 1878 IS J. STASSEN'S " NONPAREIL" 

The only machine fitted with Screwless Spokes, warranted not to break 
or loosen ; patent eccentric brake easily applied and wonderfully effective ; 
new patent double-coned adjustable steering gear ; best red rubber tyres, 
f ricUonless bearings, and all latest improvements. Every bicyclist ought 
to possess our Patent Circular-wheel VaUse. These machines are made 
for work, and are the best and cheapest machines, as they require no 
repairs and never get out of order, and are strongly recommended by 
Members of the London Bicycle Club, and by all who have used them. 
Weight of machine, from 40 lb. or from 1 lb. per inch. 

City Agent: GOT, 21. Leadenhall Street. 
PEAXES, Princes S treet, Leicester Square, London, W. 

J. STASSEN&SON, 251, EUSTON ROAD, N.W. 

Factort Entranck : BEAUMONT PLACE. ' 
Prospectus 1 d., with Photo. 3d. All sizes kept in stock ready for delivery. 

T. A. SMILY, DALSTON JUNCTION, LONDON, 

BICYCIiB AQENT, AND 

MANUFACTURER OF THE "TRAVELLER" AND "TOURIST" BICYCLES, 

Specially adapted for Travellers (commercial and others) and Tourists. 

Price Lists of these and other Bicycles, post free. 

Photos of ** Traveller " No. 1 Bicycle, and of John Keen, post free on 

application* 

THE ALERT BICYCLE FOR 1878. 

The only Bicycle that is fitted with an Adjustable Koller Bearing, every 

roller of which is warranted to tighten equally towards the centre. 

For further particulars apply to the Manufacturer, 

K« «A1«JI»JBR, C:n«rln««r. AliKAT IfTORKS, 

LITTLE COWER PLACE, EUSTON ROAD, N.W. 
(One minute's walk from Cower Street Station.) 
Bitydes of all kinds Repaired on the shortest notice 

IMPORTANT TO ALL. 
HAKBIBON'S AKTLCOBBOSIYE PASTE, 

for Preventing Rust, 6d., Is., and Is. 9d. 

HABBISON'S POLISHING POWDEB 

' instantly removes Rust and Corrosion from Metals, and for PoliBhing 
Glass, €d.. Is., and Is. 9d. (see advertisement in ** Bicycling Time«.") 

Free by post for 8, 14, and 24 stamps, of 

SHIBTCIiIFF k CO., 66, Goldhawk Boad, Shepherds Bush, london, V. 

THF 

GREAT WESTERN BICYCLE DEPOT, 

87, PEAED STEEET, 

PADDINGTON, W. 

(Three minutes* walk from Great Western and Praed Street 
Railway Stations ) 

PROPBIETOBS : 

CROOKE & CO., 

AGENTS FOB ALL FIBST-CLASS BICYCLES 
AND TBICTCLES. 



BICYCLES BOUGHT, SOLD, OR EXCHANGED. 

BICYCLES LET ON HIRE. 

Bepairs promptly executed by competent Workmen. 

GHAHGE8 MODEBATE. 

BICYCLE SUNDRIES OF EVERY DESCRIPTION. 



Price Lists on Application. 

Within three minutes walk oj Edgware Boad, Praed Street 

(Metropolitan), and Great Western liailway Stations. 
London, 1878. 



Printed for the Proprietors by Bablikg & SoK, at the Minerva Stesm 
Printing Office, 85, Eastcheap, London, £.C.— Sept 19, 1878. 



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" X engage done tous cL fmter dam leurs ecriis toute personnalit^, toute alltmon dSpassant les limites de la discussion la 

plus sindre et la plus courtoise" — Laboulbene. 



Vol. I. No. 27.] 



Edited by A. 0. WARD & J. S. STOKES. [Thursday, Sept. 26, 1878. 



CONTENTS. 



FAGS 

Manrion Honse Belief Fund 183 

John Keen's Amateur Baee Meeting 184 

Swimming 184 

Saturday Buns 185 

A Circular Tour 186 

Double Acroetics 186, 189 



FAOK 

London to Bath and Back {Oonduded) 187 

London to Southampton, St. Malo, Dinan, Mauron, Eedon, 

Nantes, St. Nazaire, Derval, Kennes, SU Malo 188 

Racing Fixtures 18J> 

Saturday Meets ^.... 189 

Exchange List 189 



MANSION HOUSE RELIEF FUND. 

Particulars have already appeared in the bicycling papers 
of a meeting attended by prominent members of most 
of the principal Metropolitan Clubs, convened for the 
purpose of organising a race meeting in aid of the sufferers 
by the wreck of the " Princess Alice." At that meeting the 
probability of the fund for this particular charity being 
sufficiently large to meet all demands before the race 
meeting could be held, was fully discussed, and it was 
proposed to hand over the proceeds to the Abercarne 
Relief Fund. A majority, however, were in favour of 
adhering to the original proposal, as the collision, happening, 
so to speak^ at our own doors, had a prior claim on our 
sympathies, and in the event of this fund being closed 
before the races were held, it was always open for them to 
transfer the proceeds to the Colliery Fund. 

The subscription list for the " Princess Alice " catastrophe 
had grown to such a large sum before the second meeting 
that it was at once decided, before taking any further 
steps, to communicate with the Lord Mayor, and the 
following is a copy of the reply to a letter written by the 
Chairman of Committee : — 

Mansion House, London, E.C., Sept. 23rd, 1878. 

DSAR Sib, — I am directed by the Lord Mayor to acknowledge the 
receipt of your letter of the 21st inst.^ and to ask you to express to your 
brother bicyclists, and to accept yourself, his cordial thanks for the 
very kind offer they and you make, to airange a race meeting in aid of 
the " Princess Alice " Fund. Seeing, however, that you cannot get the 
ground until the end of October, when, as the Lord Mayor and 
Committee hope, that ftmd will have been closed and distributed, the 
Lord Mayor requests me to suggest to you that the proceeds of your 



meeting should be devoted to the relief of the sufferers by the colliery 
accident in South Wales, the relief fund in that case being yet likely to 
remain open for some time to come. — ^Believe me, dear Sir, yours very 
faithfully, William J. Soulbby. 

M. D. Rtlcker, Esq., Jun. 

I have much pleasure in stating that my application to 
the Committee of the Surrey County Cricket Club for the 
loan of their ground — the Kennington Oval — for October 
19th has been most graciously acceded to, and it now 
remains, not only for the Committee, but for individual 
bicyclists, to do all in their power to ensure the success of 
the meeting, and, by sending a handsome sum to such a 
deserving fund, prove that bicyclists are not the selfish pot- 
hunting class that they are sometimes accused of being. 
Entries for the One Mile and Three Miles Handicaps, and 
Five Miles Scratch Race may be made to any of the fol- 
lowing gentlemen, members of the Committee :— 



Coppin ... 


... West Kent B.C. 


Cortis 


... Wanderers B.C. 


Bring 


... Stanley B.C. 


East 


... Surrey B.C. 


Etherington 


... Temple B.C. 


Goodman... 


... Surrey B.C. 


Quirk 


••• Kingston B.C. 


Rishworth 


... . Civil Service B.C. 


Riicker ... 


... London B.C. 


Runtz 


... Pickwick B.C. 


W. Waddell 


... London A.C. 



or C. J. Fox, Jun., Hon. Sec, East Temple Chambers, 
Whitefriars Street, E.C. 



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LONDON BICYCLE CLUB GAZETTE. 



As no expense will be incurred which can possibly be 
avoided, it is probable that no entrance forms will be 
printed. All that is necessary is to send full name, with 
name of Club (if any), profession or occupation, and address, 
with 2s. 6d. entrance fee for each race. The meeting will 
be held under the Union rules. All Clubmen who are 
willing to take admission tickets to sell to their friends can 
have some, as soon as they are printed, on application to 
the Hon. Sec. 

The entries will, it is hoped, be very numerous, and it 
would considerably assist the handicapper if competitors 
would state the two last races run in, at the time of 
entering. No entry can be received after October 12th. 

Further particulars will be sent from time to time to 
each of the bicycling papers. 

M. D. RucEER, Jun.y 

Chairman of the Committee. 

25th September, 1878. 



JOHN KEEN'S AMATEim RACE MEETING. 

The Four-Miles Handicap, for which John Keen had 
offered one of his patent " Eclipse " bicycles as first prize, 
was held on Monday afternoon at Lillie Bridge. The 
attendance was small, but the racing was first-class. Our 
space will allow only the bare results of the preliminary 
heats. ' 

Heat 1 : A. Tarling, Pickwick B.C., 180 yards, 1 ; W. 
Quirk, K.B.C., scratch, 2. Time, 13 mins. 9 sees. . 

Heat 2 : H. L. Cortis, Wanderers B.C., 80 yards, 1 ; 
0. Dodsworth, Goole B.C., 400 yards, 2. Time, 12 mins. 
43 sees. 

Heat 3 : F. T. East, Surrey B.C., scratch, 1 ; J. F. 
Griffith, Surrey B.C., 300, 2. Time, 12 mins. 55 sees. 

Heat 4 : W. Wyndham, L.B.C., 90, 1 ; C. H, Hart, 
Eastbourne B.C., 300,. 2. Time, 12 mius. 38 sees. 

Heat 5 : T. Derkinderen, Tower Hamlets B.C., 40 yards, 
1 ; T. M. Kemp, Kent B.C., 300, 2. Time 12 mins. 35 sees. 

Heat 6 : E. W. P. Cambridge, I Zingari B.C., 190 yards, 
1 ; J. Griffits, Univ. Coll. B.C., 250, gave up, leaving Cam- 
bridge to walk over. 

Heat 7 : J. Horn, Pickwick B.C., 320 yards, 1 ; J. Dring, 
Stanley B.C., 310, 2. Time 12 mins. 51 sees. 

Heat 8 : S. Kemp, Pickwick B.C., 270 yards, 1 ; J. W. 
Sharpe, Croydon Ramblers B.C., 210, 2. Time 12 mins. 
46 sees. 

The final produced a grand race, and great excitement 
was evinced amongst the spectators throughout. The first 
mile was completed in the following order — Horn, Tarling, 
Kemp, Cambridge, Wyndham, Cortis, East, and Derkin- 
deren. Thus early in the race East had made up so much 
graund that he was made a strong favourite amongst the 
bookmakers, a little nest of whom, we were sorry to see, 
assembled in firont of the grand stand, and whose " two to 



one bar one," became most monotonous. At the end of the 
second mile East had passed all but Kemp, Tarling, aud 
Horn, who led by the post in the order named. The pace 
was terrific, and the riders were in a line all close together. 
In the next lap, the first of the third mile. East took the 
lead and he was considered certain of the first prize, but 
the others would not let him get away, Derkinderen hanging 
on at his back wheel, followed closely by Cambridge, Tar- 
ling, Kemp, Wyndham, and Cortis. In the next lap 
Wyndham put on a spurt and ran into third place, which 
he held until the first lap of the last mile, when, in addition 
to East and Derkinderen, Cambridge took a place before 
him, in fact it was not until the last lap that he looked at all 
dangerous, and then the excitementwas intense when, putting 
on one of his fine spurts, which last year we saw so often but 
have this year been seldom favoured with, he rushed up level 
with East at the bottom comer of the railway stretch, and, 
without slackening, passed on the outside and came into 
the straight for home two yards ahead, and despite East's 
most strenuous efforts he ran home a winner by four yards, 
Derkinderen coming in third, two yards only behind East. 
East's times for each mile were — 1st mile 3 mins. 2^ sec, 
2nd 6 mins. 8 sec, 3rd 9 mins. 13 sec, and 4th 12 mins. 
17^ sec, the fastest time on record. East had passed 
Wyndham, to whom he conceded 90 yards start, in the 
first lap of the second mile, so it is evident, from the way 
in which Wyndham stuck when led at such a pace by such 
a rider, that his old form is returning. 



SWIMMING. 



Of L.B.C. men Messrs. H. V. Cleaver and A. P. Stokes 
competed for the Otter S. C. 500 yards gold badge, on 
Friday last, the 20th, the time given beiug 8 minutes. 
Cleaver secured the honour, with 3 seconds to spare, but 
Stokes was 10 seconds to the bad. He turned badly or 
would probably have succeeded. 

At the Cadogan Swimming Entertainment, held on 
Saturday last, the 21st, Messrs. Cleaver, Scott, and Sewell 
represented the L.B.C., though swimming, of course, as 
members of Swimming Clubs. Stokes (8 yards) and Sewell 
(14 yards) were knocked out of it in the first round, but 
Cleaver (7 yards) only lost his second round by 2 yards, 
limit man winning with' 30 yards start. 

Tickets for the Otter S. C. Entertainment, announced to 
come off on the 11th prax., are now out, and as the number 
is limited, early application is necessary. Messrs. Cleaver 
and Newman will be happy to supply members upon appli- 
cation.- Price 28. each. 

I shall be much obliged to any member who can inform 
me where I can keep a machine at Bamet through the 
winter at a moderate cost ; perhaps others will also be glad 
to know the same thing.— Yours truly, A. N. Otheb. 



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SATURDAY RUNS. 
N.E. District. 
There was a muster of four in the N.E. on Saturday. 
They made their way to Chingford, which was the adver- 
tised destination^ although we waited nearly half an hour 
for a distinguished member who had promised to come and 
bring a large band of followers, but who did not appear 
before the expiry of the above-mentioned time. We reached 
Chingford so early that we did not even trouble to look for 
a halting place suitable for our requirements (it is more 
than doubtful if such a thing could be found), but rode on 
by Chingford station and Queen Elizabeth's lodge, and so 
up to Woodford, where one of us went home and the other 
three rode down Buckhurst Hill, which (though rather 
rough for a nervous member of the party who had great 
recollections of his last ride half way down the hill) was 
safely accomplished by all ; thence through Loughton and 
along to the Chigwell Lane Station over good roads, except 
on the steep hill which was more conveniently walked than 
ridden, we came on to the Chigwell and Abridge road 
about half a mile from Chigwell. As one of us lived at 
Ongar and two at Walthamstow, another division was 
deemed advisable, and the larger party returned over very 
good roads, reaching home at 6.30. Present : Christie, 
T. Godlee, Keynes. 

Francis Godlbe, District Captain. 

Members will kindly note that the roads to Abridge are 
now in good condition, and the chancas are very much in 
favour of their being so on Saturday, when our run takes 
us in that direction. 



N.W. DiSTRICJT. 



SeptemberSUt. Little Berkhampstead. Whether it was the 
roads or the temperature that proved tempting is doubtful, 
but certainly the meet of Saturday last was attended in force 
creditable even for the N. W. Six or eight members met at 
"Jack Straw's," a considerable addition being made onreach- 
ing Golder's Green. In the absence of the District Captain, 
Tegetmeier assumed the duties appertaining to that post 
after Smith had declined, on the plea that he was " only a 
visitor *' (!). The speed of a few runaways having been 
checked, a steady pace was maintained to Barnet, where 
Clarke left us, McMillan and Newman following suit at 
Potter's Bar. Taking the right-hand road here, but avoid- 
ing Northaw, a very pretty lane was followed to Carbon 
Hill, the descent of which was accomplished on foot by 
several. After passing Newgate Street the wheel of 
Marchant's brake fixed, and gave him an opportunity of 
dismounting over the handles. Arrived at Berkliampstead, 
a consultation took place, when it was decided to go on to 
Essendon to tea at the ** Salisbury Crest," in order that 
the stony piece pf road intervening might be covered in 
daylight. Essendon was reached at 6.40 p.m., and after a 
good tea at Is. 6d., a start was effected at 8^20 p.m. The 



array of lamps caused quite an illumination, and proved 
very useful as the night was rather dark. Present : Bacon, 
Buckler, Burroughs, Clarke, Cook, Preeth, Koch, McMillan, 
Marchant, Newman, Powell, Sharp, W. A. Smith, Teget- 
meier, Visick, and one visitor. 

E. Tegetmbieb. 
P.S. — Saturday next, Essendon by a new route. 



Western District. 



The run to Little Berkhampstead was only attended by 
three members, one rode straight from the City to the 
N. W. rendezvous at "Jack Straw's Castle," and two more 
were found awaiting us at Golder's Green. The surface as 
far as Barnet was a sad contrast to the usual excellence of 
the roads, which the Western men enjoy in their own 
district, but after Barnet it was very good, and the scenery 
between Potter's Bar and Newgate Street was charming. 
Carbone Hill is nasty, long, and steep, and not worth the 
risk of riding, the corresponding ascent is too rough to ride, 
so there was more walking than was pleasant. We took 
the vote as to staying at Berkhampstead or going to Essen- 
don to tea, and the latter carried the day. After a cosy 
tea we set out for home, warmed by the good cheer of 
" The Salisbury Crest," and our darkness made light by 
the rays of the Salisbury lamps, and taking the shortest 
way to the main Hatfield road, did not part from our 
friends of the N. W. until Finchley was reached, thence 
we rode via Hendon, Neusdon, etc., home. Distance about 
50 miles. Present : J. P. Marchant, E. C. Koch, and . 
W. A. Smith, District Captain. 



A CIRCULAR TOUR. 



Two members of the L.B.C. having finally arranged a 
trip into Hampshire,, which had been postponed, owing to 
the recent wet weather, started for 'their run on Saturday, 
the 6th inst. "60-Inch" rode down by the well-known 
route through Ripley, Guildford, and the " Hog's Back, to 
Farnham, where he was joined at 2.30 p.m. by " 53-Inch," 
who had trained from town ; thence they proceeded without 
a dismount to Petersfield by the picturesque road over 
Woolmer Forest, passing for several miles through heather 
in full bloom. At Petersfield it was determined to leave 
the direct road in order to explore the scenery about Stonor 
Hill, with its magnificent wooded glen, little visited, but 
scarcely to be matched elsewhere. The road, which 
winds round the hill, ascends for about two miles, and 
is, no doubt, a stiff pull, but the surface is good, and 
the engineering has been so cleverly managed that a great 
elevation is gradually attained without any appreciable 
expenditure of strength. At the top the right-hand road 
was taken, gradually descending to the main road from 
Alton. Turning here to the left the ride was continued, 
without dismounting, to West Meon, where milk may 



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always be obtained at a white farm-house which stands on 
a slight elevation up a lane facing the main 'road. No 
further stoppage till Droxford was reached, where " 60-Inch " 
put up for the night at a small inn called the "White 
Horse " (Collins). The bill of this establishment, unique in 
its moderation, deserves to be chronicled : good tea, bed 
and breakfast, 3s. in all ! ! Travellers, however, will do 
well to note that if they want a really well-aired bed they 
must stipulate for sheets " hot from the fire," which are 
supposed to cost 6d. extra. The accommodation, though 
homely, is comfortable and satisfactory. First day's ride, 
69| miles. Next morning a start was made at 10.30 for 
London, passing through Brookwood, Bramdean, Cheriton, 
Hockley, Ovington, TOchbome, and Alresford ; roads nearly 
level, with good surface, and running through a pretty 
sylvan district. The ancestral demesne of the Tichbornes 
looked sadly neglected, and naturally brought to mind the 
strange story of the "Claimant" and his doings. From 
Alresford, via Abbotson Downs and Bugmore Hill, to the 
celebrated "yew-tree drive," in order to visit which the 
'cyclists deviated some two miles from their way. This 
avenue runs for a mile between a double row of immense 
yew trees, at least 600 years old, and formed, in olden 
time; the approach to a castle (now in ruins) on a neigh- 
bouring eminence. 

The long and smooth run down from Bugmore Hill was 
duly enjoyed, "legs over handles," by "53- Inch," followed, 
at a more moderate pace, by " 60-Inch," who kept to his " 
treadles in orthodox fashion. At a village a little further 
on, milk was offered and supplied gratis by a kindly young 
farmer, a rare instance of rural benevolence. Whilst the 
" stealthy bicycles " were descending the yew-tree drive a 
fine missel thrush was dropped close to the riders by a 
hawk, which had just killed it, and which, doubtless, must 
have shared Justice Lusk's ideas as to their startling ap- 
proach. Three miles more, and the dangerous hill of 
Farleigh is met with. This steep and loose descent had 
been ridden down on a previous occasion by " 5S-Inch," 
who was then ignorant of its nature, and who just escaped 
a catastrophe, owing to his powerful brake and dexterous 
riding. " 60-Inch," who viewed it for the first time, de- 
clared it to be a worthy double of the far-famed Bury Hill, 
near Arundel, where so many imprudent bicyclists have 
been seriously injured. At Basingstoke a stop was made 
at the " Red Lion Hotel," where a sum of 4s. 6d. each was 
charged for a plain dinner, consisting of leg of mutton, 
beans, potatoes, and two bottles of Bass; no cheese or 
sweets. Verb. sap. 

The homeward route was then resumed at a rattling 
pace along the fine road to Bagshot, and thence, more 
slowly, to Egham, where rain had made the running rather 
heavy. Milk may be always had at Leggatt's, immediately 
at the foot of the hill descending into the town. The 
journey was concluded along the tame and monotonous 



road, vid Staines and Hounslow, to Eew Bridge. Distance, 
78^ miles, or 148^ in the two days. Those who wish for a 
pleasant trip over good roads, and through interesting and 
varied scenery, may safely follow in the tracks of 

"Two Vetkrahs." 



1. 

2. 

3. 

4. 

5. 

6. 

7. 

8. 

9. 
10. 
11. 
12. 
13. 
14. 
15. 
16. 
17. 

ih. 

19. 
20. 



DOUBLE ACROSTIC. 
True, faithful service we applaud 
And give my first as the reward. 
A frSigrant weed which bears the name 
Of Cuban city, whence it came. 
A warlike king, who mourned the loss 
Of his dear queen with many a cross. 
Lazy and begging see them lie 
In Naples* streets 'neath burning sky. 
A wicked island where they ate. 
One fitted well to navigate. 
In pubUc, if you've aught to do. 
You sometimes feel a little so. 
The ancients had a game, I trow. 
In which this thing they used to throw. 
In court, if you a witness be, 
And testify, you first take me. 
Beware of taking cold, 'twill seize 
And torture, leaving you no ease. 
Don't ride without me, or yom may 
Meet active Robert one fine day. 
In every name, whate'er it be, 
I'm the first letter you will see. 
Last year I went a mile at Ryde 
In one of these against the tide. 
I fear that e'er you have half done 
This rigmarole, you will give one. 
The name for a rough point of rock. 
The Land o'<]lakes has a good stock. 
People agree to call me blind ; 
Quite a mistake, I've eyes you'll find. 
A Grecian slave who fables wrote, 
I use no diphthong, please to note. 
A quick upset and heavy fall 
By this name riders sometimes call. 
The group of little isles which lie 
Just to the north of Sicily. 
Discover this, and you have named 
The land of one for patience famed. 
A glorious run and bathe had we. 
My last then called us in to tea. 

Those of my first, my whole who guess, 
I trust will wish my last success. 



M. 



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187 



LONDON TO BATH AND BACK. 

225 MILES IN 29} HOUBS. 

(Concluded,) 

6. To Bath (not 6 miles per hour). By walking on foot 
for the first mile or two, then enduring some excruciating 
bumps over a very rough road, and again walking down a 
very dangerous descent, we eventually joined the main 
road, that so many of us know full well, at Bath Easton, 
about 2j miles from the " White Lion Hotel," which we 
soon reached (7.10 a.m.), and where they had a capital 
breakfast for us, which we thoroughly appreciated. N.B. — 
The " boots " thought it rather a sell to have been kept up 
all night expecting us, and I think so too ; however, a dose 
of our patent medicine speedily cured him. We here 
resolved to return by the L.B.C. last Whit-Monday Road 
Trial Course. 

7. To the top of Box Hill (7i miles per hour). On 
arriving at the summit I dismounted and looked back to 
see how Mr. Bacon was getting on ; as for myself I was my 
own shower-bath, the heat being then very great. After 
15 minutes I began to grow impatient, and sent messages 
by every vehicle or pedestrian (few and far between) going 
down the hill, and importuned for news everyone who 
ascended from below, but all in vain. I grew more and 
more impatient, and relieved myself by whistling furiously 
and giving sundry kicks to terra Jirma, greatly to the 
astonishment of the occupants of the lodge close by, and 
after 1^ hours I gave up waiting, knowing well that some 
news would have come to me by that time had there been 
any accident, and half fearing what had really occurred, 
which was this : Mr. Bacon had unhappily forgotten Box 
Hill, and had taken, at the village of Box, a road leading 
direct to Shaw Church, saving thereby about 2 J miles, but 
unfortunately causing this terrible loss of time to me. 
Those who know Box Hill will perfectly understand why I 
did not run down it to see what had become of my com- 
panion, those who do not know it are advised to try it 
when they are quite fresh, and they will be able to imagine 
it after 115 miles. 

8. To Marlborough (12 miles per hour), a magnificent 
spin of 28 miles, via Corsham, Melksham, and Devizes, 
including two dismounts, the first causing a halt of 
fifteen minutes, owing to the break-pin (that weak point of 
the ''-Club" machine) falling out, the handle immediately 
becoming vieoct to useless, and I was threatened with a 
sudden termination to my journey (just suppose this had 
occurred in the night, ay, and while I was flying down 
Marlborough Hill in the dark) ; as it was, I was lucky 
enough to find it after a diligent search, and soon fixed it 
in again, and proceeded ; the second dismount was but for 
a moment, to fix a strap that had become unfastened. At 
Marlboro' I waited in the hope that Mr. Bacon might yet 
turn up, and lost another half-hour for my pains. 

9. To Newbury (nearly 11 miles per hour). I here 



learnt that Mr. Bacon was ahead about half an hour, but 
as I halted for the welcome '' beef tea" once more, he had 
a clear hour's start. I nevertheless determined to give 
chase. 

10. To Beading (nearly 11 miles per hour). I here 
found that it wanted only ten minutes to the twenty-four 
hours, so I took the distance, viz., 182 miles 3 furlongs, 
and enjoyed some tea till the time was up. 

11. To Longford (over 9 J miles per hour). Shortly after 
Twyford I caught Mr. Bacon, which caused a dismount, 
and, as he seemed rather done up (to use his own words), I 
obtained leave to push on, and I did so as far as Longford, 
where / also thought some rest advisable, ten minutes at 
Beading, and not more than five with Mr. Bacon, being the 
only halts since Newbury. Here — at Longford — I confess 
I consulted the G. W.B,. time tables, but a little Dutch courage 
infused into me, a cosy chat with a Cornishman, and an 
hour's rest worked wonders, and at 9.15 p.m. I commenced 
the last stretch. 

12. To St. John's Wood (lOJ miles per hour), which I 
reached at 11 p.m. exactly — this I consider an extraordi- 
nary little spurt after such a journey. It is curious to note 
also that it took five minutes less time to do this than it 
had taken the previous evening when the start was made ; 
and again, that another five minutes is included, caused by 
a forced dismount at the canal bridge near Holsdon Green, 
which tempted me to indulge in a glass of ale, there having 
been no dismount on the outward journey. 

13. My condition on reaching home appeared to be no 
worse than after a long day's ride, except that I was rather 
excited. I think that had I found, on my return, some 
energetic member of the L.B.C, who would have insisted 
upon another 25 miles, it would not have been impossible, 
instead of which I partook of a light supper, and at mid- 
night was asleep "like a top!" I covered the whole 
distance, 225 miles, in the saddle, except the unrideable 
parts of the cross-road between Ford and Bath, and Marl- 
borough Hill coming back. 

14. Mr. Bacon's return journey. I gather from him the 
following : He only made one principal halt (viz. New- 
bury) between Box and Twyford, where I came up with 
him ; Marlborough Hill proved too much for him, as it was 
for me. At the end of twenty-four hours he reckons he 
had covered 185 miles. After I had passed him near 
Twyford, he very pluckily held on as far as Kew Bridge 
(11 p.m.) 214 miles, where, in spite of the efforts of a well- 
known member of the Club (who even offered to run 
alongside of him on foot some ten miles or so), to induce 
him to finish the journey, he had the good sense to take 
train home, and arrive there safely at midnight. 

15. Final Note. I don't know what you will think of 
me, Messieurs the Editors, but, doubtless, with your expe- 
rience, you will at once see through my little game in 
spinning out this account to such an interminable length ; 



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yet I can boldly ask you to receive the next few lines. I 
have re-written this paper so many times that I cannot 
place them in their proper place, but return with me to 
Melksham. As I passed through that comfortable little 
town I slackened speed, and looked (alas ! in vain) for Mr. 
Hutchings and his watch. He was not there, of course ; 
indeed, the very ground on which he had stood was up 
with main drainage works. I confess I felt something 
missing, a small presentiment, truly, yet I little thought 
tbat the very next day or so all of us would experience the 
same feeling, still I cannot help hoping that the next time 
we pass in any great numbers through Melksham we shall 
not fail to receive a word of recognition from the same 
friendly voice that we heard there last Whit Monday. 
That is all. H. C. Feebth. 

LONDON TO SOUTHAMPTON, ST. MALO, DINAN, 
MAURON, REDON, NANTES, ST. NAZAIRE, 
DERVAL, RENNES, ST. MALO. 

To those who intend visiting Brittany on some future 
occasion, the following short account of some of the roads 
and scenery, as traversed this summer by Wilson and 
m3rself» may be useful. 

We left Waterloo Station on Friday, August 9th, by the 
nine o'clock train for Southampton, which gave us plenty 
of time at that place to get our bicycles comfortably stowed 
away on board the *^ Guernsey," in which boat they and 
your humble servjants were subsequently transported to 
St. Malo. We reached that town of awful smells at two 
o'clock in the morning on Saturday, after a moderately 
calm passage, and as we had met several friends on board, 
we thoroughly enjoyed ourselves. 

We did not land until six o'clock, and we no sooner got 
our machines on shore than they were seized by two 
officials and hurried off to the Custom House. After satis- 
fying them that we had no contraband, and that we did 
* not intend to pay any more ^or our bicycles, they let us 
go. By-the-bye, I may mention we only paid three shil- 
lings and sixpence for them from London, which I thought 
extremely moderate. At the advice of an 'Englishman on 
the boat, we rode off to the " Hotel Franklin," which is by 
far the best in St. Malo. It was as well we hurried, for 
we had no sooner got under shelter than it began to rain 
the proverbial " cats and dogs." This efifectually put a 
stop to our starting away that morning, so, after having 
some breakfast, we donned our waterproof capes and turned 
out to see the town. We came across an English gentle- 
man painting in the market-place ; his picture seemed to 
amuse the populace immensely. He had sketched an old 
fruit woman in the act of swearing at her neighbour until 
she was very red in the face. On finding herself transferred 
to paper in this state, she seemed rather proud than other- 
wise. At two o'clock the rain stopped, and we made a 
start for Dinan, but had not got far before we had to dis- 
mount for a heavy shower. All the way to Dinan, over a 



beastly road, we had continually to repeat this exercise, as 
we preferred getting under shelter to getting wet We 
went through Chateauneuf, as it saves crossing the water, 
but it makes one's road several miles longer. We entered 
Dinan over a magnificent bridge which here crosses the 
river, and rode to the " Hotel de Commerce," but as they 
had no room, went on to the " Hotel de Bretagne," which 
we found afterwards was the best. Distance 21 miles. 

Sunday. Started at half-past twelve, after being very 
comfortable at this hotel, which we can recommend. We 
intended reaching Ploermel that evening, but as an old 
proverb has it, " Man proposes," etc. To St. Jouan the 
road is very rough and hilly, and we had to travel against 
a strong head wind. After some slight refreshment here, 
we mounted again and trundled away, as we fondly thought, 
for Ploermel. After going for about five miles, I suggested 
referring to the map, when to our horror we found we were 
travelling due north instead of due south. After a good 
deal of walking, and, I am sorry to say, anything but good 
language, we struck the main road again, after having 
made a circle of just twelve miles. Riding over a dread- 
fully bad and hilly road, we reached St. M^n. From that 
place to Mauron, where we decided to stop, the road 
improved a little, but the wind still made it hard riding. 
We found the " Hotel de France" after some trouble, 
although it was the only one in the town, and managed, 
notwithstanding our exertions, to make a good supper. 
Distance 47 miles. 

Monday. Got up at 8.30 a.m., and found it raining 
and blowing hard. Anyhow, after breakfast we got our 
customary stroll round the town, and I managed to get a 
sketch of the cathedral, noted, according to our idea, for its 
dirt. Still, one gets used to that in the French churches. 
The rain having stopped, we made a start at 12 o'clock 
for Redon. The road to Ploermel was very rough and 
hilly, but with fine scenery all round, which made up a 
little for our hard work ; a strong wind from the S.W. 
did not, however, allow us any rest, although we had 
several very nice pieces of down hill. We stopped at this 
town for some wine and fruit, and then trundled on again 
down a very steep hill, out of the town to Malestroit 
Had some more wine here, and then our pleasures com- 
menced. To the left, over the bridge out of the town, 
and along by the river it was splendid " going," perfectly 
level, with delightful views on each side ; and as we were 
travelling S.E. we got the wind with us a little for a 
change. The sun was just setting in a magnificent bank 
of clouds on our right, and this fact, coupled with Wilson's 
watch pointing to six o'clock, warned us that we had no 
time to spare if we wished to finish our journey by daylight 
The road, however, took it into its head to incline down- 
wards, a most unusual occurrence as far as our experience 
went; so we were soon safely housed at Redon in the 
" Hotel de France," which did not strike us at the time as 



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being very clean, and we found by experience tbat our 
first impression was correct. After a very good supper we 
turned into bed at ten o'clock, and enjoyed our well-earned 
rest. Distance 44 miles. 

Tuesday. — ^Rose at 9 o'clock, and were again disappointed 
to find it raining hard, but as we had before decided on 
stopping the morning here and doing some sketching, we 
were in hopes it might clear up by the time we wished to 
start. I got a very fine view of the cathedral from the 
road, Wilson doing the same, but from our bedroom window; 
he has accordingly preserved a fine study of chimney-pots. 
At three o'clock we started and, as usual, rode over hilly 
and bad roads to Blain. After some light refreshment here, 
we went on to Heric, the road being decently level, and 
continued so until we had left that town ten miles in our 
rear, when the long hills began again, and continued right 
into Nantes. To make matters worse it began to rain 
hard, so, dismounting, we donned our waterproof capes, 
light the SaUsburys, and went into the town in style (?) 
We rode to the " Hotel de Bretagne," in the upper part of 
the town, but finding it fiill, had a weary tramp of fully 
a mile to the " Hotel de France," where luckily we found 
room. As this was the most southerly town we intended 
visiting, we had decided to stop the next day and see the 
place thoroughly. Consequently, with the anticipation of 2^ 
lazy day for the morrow, we turned in and slept as sound 
as the proverbial " top." Distance 45 miles. 

Wednesday. Got up at half-past nine, had coffee in our 
room, and then sallied out to the post-office for letters ; 
then to the river for a swim. • Next on to the Cathedral, 
where we heard some fine music and singing, and then on 
again to several of the show places, which Black describes 
much better than I can do, so I won't attempt it ; suffice it 
to say we managed to pass the time away until 12 o'clock, 
when we had breakfast, and not before wo walited it. We 
passed the afternoon in much the same way, and in the 
evening visited a caf^ and heard some good songs, if one 
may judge by the applause they excited. We turned in at 
half-past ten, having decided on St. Nazaire as our desti- 
nation next day. 

(To be continued.) 

DOUBLE ACROSTIC. 

1. My first in Somerset is founds 
In cities also does abound. 

2. Take you my next, to find me out 
You must in China search about. 

3. On boating trips my third, you'll find. 
You can't with comfort leave behind. 

4. The Eastern sage my pa^es reads. 
And finds advice for all his needs. 

5. The pick of all the clubs, you see, 
You will allow my fifth to be. 

6. The Grecian used my next to make 
Their phalanx difficult to break. 

My whole ; two names you will agree, 

Are welcome to the L.B.C. Sibti.. 



RACING FIXTURES. 

Sept. 28th. — Beckenham Bicycle Club, Beckenham Cricket 
Ground — splendid grass course. Two miles 
Open Handicap. M. D. RUcker, Jun., Handi- 
capper. Entnes (28. 6dL) close Wednesday, 
September 18th, to C. r. Maltby, Clarence 
House, Coper's Cope Road, Beckenham. 

Sept. 28th. — Surrey Bicycle Club. Kennington Oval. 
Two Miles Handicap and Ten Miles Level 
Race. Entries (2s. 6d. each event) close 
Saturday morning, September 21st, ta T. C. 
Budd, 2, The Terrace, Barnes. Racing to 
commence at 3 p.m. 

Oct. 5th. — One MUe Handicap, LiUie Bridge. First 
prize, New Bicycle. Entries r2s. 6d.) to be 
made before September 28tn to Messrs. 
Humber, Marriott, and Cooper, the pro- 
moters. Handicapper — Mr. M. D. RtLcKer, 
Jun. 

Oct. 12th. — ^Brighton Athletic Club. Sussex County 
Cricket Ground. Two Miles Handicap. 
Handicapper, M. D. Rticker, Jun. Entries 
(2s. 6d.) close on October 4th, to J. Saunders, 
Jun., 2, Montpelier Street, Brighton. 

Oct. 12th. — Clapham Bicycle Club. Stamford Bridge. 
One Mile Handicap. Handicapper, M. J). 
Riicker, Jun. ' Entries (2s. 6d.) to be sent to 
Mr. L. M. MacGan, 157, Brixton Road, 
S.W., before 5th October. 

Oct. 19th. ^Race Meeting at Kennington Oval, in aid of 
the Sufferers by the Abercame Colliery Ex- 
plosion. One and Three Miles Handicaps 
fHandicapper, M. D. Riicker, Jun.), and Five 
Miles Scratch Rac6. Entries (28. 6d. each 
event) can be sent to M. D. Mcker, Jun., 
• before October 12th. 

Oct. 26th.— Inter-Club Races C.U.Bi.C. v. L.B.C. One, 
four, and fifteen miles. Cambridge Ground. 



S.E. 



SATURDAY MEETS. 
District. — Sbptbmber 28th. 



Croydon Division.— Central Croydon Station, at 3.45 
p.m., for Godstone. Meet Blackheath Division. 

Blackheath Division. —Foot of College Park Hill, Lewis- 
ham, at 3.30 p.m., for Godstone. Meet Croydon Division. 
N.E. District. — Sbptbmbbr 28th. 
Top of Lea Bridge Road, 3.30 p.m., for Abridge. 
Western District Runs for Septembjsr. 
28th— To Essendon, with N.W. 
On October 12th (full moonj a party will ride to Peters- 
field (for Stonor Hill) by the direct Portsmouth road, oyer 
Hind Head, etc.,. returning over splendid roads the following 
da^. I shall be glad to receive names of members wishing 
to join the trip. W. A. Smith, District Captain. 

EXCHANGE LIST. 
62-inch " Norwood," half-bright, in splendid condition, 
good as new. Roller and cone bearings. Front lever brake. 
RAt-trap pedals. £12.— V. D. F., 41, Finborough Road, 
West Brompton, London, S.W. 

Mr. Thorn's Ride to the North. — Mr. W. T. Thorn- 
has, we learn, been compelled to abandon the idea of doing 
fast times, owing to the roads the other side of York being 
in very bad condition. 



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BICYCLE OUTFIHER, CLUB UNIFORMS, 

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GOY'S NEW PLAN. 

All the Best Makes at Mannfaetnrer's Prices. 
By arrangement with the Mannfactorers orders have the same 
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a deal of trouble. 

IMMEDIATE DELIVERY. 
Write for Particulars and Price Lists, 



TRICYCLES for Ladies or Gentlemen. 
YOUTHS' BICYCLE S. 

GOY'S CLUB ROOM, 

HOST CENTRALLY SITUATED. 

Ofifered FREE to Officers of all Clubs to arrange Matches, 
Committee Meetings, &c. 



(K)T,{'»^'^C5SSXI2r:}London, B.O. 

A SEAL BOOH TO BICfTCIISTS. 

PHIVER*S EXQUISITE MAIMUS ALBA, 

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FOR THE HANDS AND FEET. 
8PKCIAL Nonoc— Owing to the great demand, fntare pricea will be 6d., li., le. 6d., Sk 
and H. 6d. Bj Poet, 8d., le. Sd., le. 8d., 9b. 3d. and 2i. 9d. SoU WhoU$aU Agent, 

J. M ASOir, 120. Goldhawk Soad, Shepherd's Bush, London, W. 

AoBifTs.— Got, 21, Leadenhall-etrect. E.C; Crooke * Co., 87, Praed-etrect, W.; 
Hill & Son, 4, HaTmarket. S.W. : A. Markbam, 345, Edgware-road, W. ; J. Butler, 
63, Qneen'e-road, St. John'e-wood; Barrow h Co., High-itreet, Kensington; 
Howard ± Co., Charlee^treet, Hatton-garden, B.C. ; T. Clare, 70, Fenchnrch- 
street, E.C. ; Thiel lay's Toilet Clnb. Charii<g-crott Station j at all the Metropolitan 
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A BOON TO BICYCLISTS. 

BICYCLE RIDING TAUGHT PERFECTLY 

AT THB 

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The largest in London. 

Single Lesson, Is. 6d. Perfect Riding gruaranteed, 10s« 

Address— CHEQUER YARD, 
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Teacher— Professor T. QUINTON. 

CHAMPION OBNAMENTAL BIDER. 

THE EMPRESS 

Is acknowledged as the best Roadster. Strong, durable, and easy run- 
ning. Always gives satisfaction. Strongly recommended by members 
of London Bicycle and other Clubs. 

Sole Agent: T. A. SM ILY, DA L8T0H JtrHCTIOH, E. 

THE NORWOOD. 

A newly-designed light Roadster. A very elegant machine. Will 
stand plenty of work. Weight of 62-inch', 40 lb. City Agent :— 

g r 21. LEADENHALL STREET, ) r.-...^ ^^ 
gi 54, LIME STREET, | London, KG. 

W. KEEV, Empress Bieyele Works, Horwood Junction, S.E. 
Price Lists, One Stamp, 



THE BICYCLE OF THE DAY FOR 1878 IS J. STASSEN'S " NONPAREIL" 

The only machine fitted with Screwless Spokes, warranted not to break 
or loosen ; patent eccentric brake easily applied and wonderfully effective ; 
new patent double-coned adjustable steering gear ; beet red rubber tyres, 
f rictionless bearings, and all latest impioyements. Every bicyclist ought 
to possess our Patent Circular-wheel Valise. These machines are made 
for work, and are the best and cheapest machines, as they require no 
repairs and never get out of order, and are strongly rec(»nmended by 
Members of the London Bicycle Club, and by all who have uaed them. 
Weight of machine, from 40 lb. or from 1 lb. per inch. 

City Agent: GOT, 21. Leadenhall Street. 
PEASES, Pnnoes S treet, Leicerter Square, London, W. 

J. STASSEN & SON, 251. EUSTON ROAD, N.W. 

Faotobt Ehtbancb : BEAUMONT PLACE. 
Prospectus Id., with Photo. Sd. All sizes kept in stock ready for delivery. 

T. A. SMILY, DALSTON JUNCTION, LONDON, 

BICYCLE AGENT, AND 

MANUFACTURER OF THE "TRAVELLER" AND "TOURIST" BICYCLES, 

Specially adapted for Travellers (commercial and others) and Tourists.. 



Price Lists of these and other Bicycles, post free. 
""" " " *' 1. Bicycle, and of T 
appucation. 



Photos of ''Traveller '* No. 1 Bicycle, and of John Keen, post free on 



THE ALERT BICYCLE FOR 1878. 

The only Bicycle that is fitted with an Adjustable BoUer Bearing, eveiy 

roller of which is warranted to tighten equally towards the centre. 

For further particulars apply to tne Manufacturer, 

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LITTLE GOWER PLACE, HUSTON ROAD, N.W. 
(One minute's walk from Gower Street Station.) 
BieycUs oj all hinds itepatred on the shortest notice, 

IMPORTANT TO ALL. 
HAELBISON'S AKTI-COKKOSIYE PASTE, 

for Preventing Rust, 6d., Is., and Is. 9d. 

HABBISON'S POLISHINO POWDEB 

instantly removes Rust and Corrosion from Metals, and for Polishing 
Glass, 6d., Is., and Is. 9d. (see advertisement in ** Bicycling Times.*') 

Free by post for 8, 14, and 24 stamps, of 

SHIBTCLIFy k CO., 66, Goldhawk Boad, Shepherds Bush, london, V. 

T.HF 

GREATWE8TERN BICYCLE DEPOT, 

87, PEAED STEEET, 

PADDINGTON, W. 

(Three minutes* walk from Great Western and Praed Street 

Railway Stations ) 

Pbopbibtobs : 

CROOKE & CO., 

AGENTS FOB ALL FIBST-CLASS BICYCLES 
AND TBICYCLES. 



BICYCLES BOUGHT, SOLD, OR EXCHANGED. 

BICYCLES LET ON HIRE. 

tlepairs promptly executed by competent Workmen. 

CHABGE8 MODEBATE. 

BICYCLE SUNDRIES OF EVERY DESCRIPTION. 



Price Lists on Application. 

Within three minutes* walk oj Edgware Soad, Praed Street 
(Metropolitan), and Great Western Bailway Stations, 

London, 1878. 



Printed for the Proprietors by Dakling & Son, at the Minerva Steam 
Printing Office, 35, Eastcheap, London, E.C— Sept 26, 1878. 



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' JTengage done tous d ^ter dans leurs eariis taute personnalit^, toute allusion dipassant les limites de la discussion la 

plus sincire et la plus courtoiseJ^ — ^Laboulbenb. 



Vol. I. No. 28-] 



Edited by A. 0. WAKD & J. S. STOKES. [Thursday, Oct. 3, 1878. 



CONTENTS. 



Race Meeting in aid of tb^ Sufferers by the Abercame Colliery 

Explosion 190 

Club Runs 190 

llie Posting of Candidates for Election 190 

Ladies' Challenge Prize 191 

Beckenham Bicycle Club Race Meeting 191 

Saturday Runs 192 

London to Torquay and Back 192 

Surrey Bicycle Meeting at the Oval 198 



FAOK 

Thorn's Ride to the North 194 

London to Southampton, St. Malo, Dinan, Manron, Redon, 

Nantes, St. Nasaire, Derval, Rennes, St. Malo 195 

Answer to Double Acrostic 196 

Racing Fixtures '. 196 

Saturday Meets 196 

Exchange List 196 

Answers to Correspondents 196 

Notice to Correspondents 196 



RACE MEETING 
In Aid of thb Stjffbbebs by the Abergarue Oollieby 
. Explosion, 
To be held at Kennington Oval, October 19th. 

A meeting of the Gominittee was held on Tuesday last, 
when it was decided that the admission to the Oval on the day 
of the meeting should be one shilling, and to the enclosure 
two shillings, but enclosure tickets can be purchased before 
the day of any member of the Committee, or of any of the 
bicycle agents, at one shilling. The Committee will feel 
obliged if bicyclists will do all they can to dispose of tickets 
. to their friends, as the pecuniary success of the undertaking 
will depend mainly on the number of shillings so obtained, 
more especially if the day should be wet. 

The Hon. Sec. will be pleased to forward any number of 
tickets to clubmen willing to undertake the sale of the 
same, those not sold to be returned on the day previous 
to the meeting. 

Mr. Wm. WaddeU, wishing that no obstacle should stand 
in the way of success, generously offered, . on behalf of his 
club, to postpone the One Mile Handicap already adver- 
tised to be held by the London Athletic Club, on the 19th 
inst., at Stamford Bridge. 

A fairly large number of entries have already been 
received, and the best amateurs of the day have promised 
to compete, so that a splendid afternoon's sport may be 
confidently expected. 

M. D. RucKER, Junu, 

Chairman of Committee. 



CLUB RUNS. 

During the winter months endeavours will be made in 
each District to maintain Saturday afternoon social runs. 
Each District will make what arrangements are most 
suitable to their own members. Place and time of de- 
parture will be fixed as heretofore, but in some Districts 
the destination will not be decided upon till the start. In 
these cases word will be left at the rendezvous for the 
benefit of such as ride after. 

Those who recollect the very satisfactory S.B. runs last 
winter will, no doubt, be pleased to learn that measures 
are being taken to secure their renewal this season. 



THE POSTING OF CANDIDATES FOR ELECTION. 

At the last Committee meeting it was stated that 
members were of opinion that the names of men up for 
election should be published in the Gazette beforehand, 
giving non-committee men the chance of communicating 
with the Committee in cases where they possessed personal 
knowledge of the candidate. 

We are informed, however, on legal authority, that such 
a proceeding would go near to risk an action for libel in 
case the candidate were rejected. Even if this were not 
the case, it would be very hard upon a man to have it 
publicly known that he had been black-balled ; and the 
present method works well enough. 

It is intended, however, to propose, at the next general 
meeting, a measure which will securely guarantee the 



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LONDON BICYCLE CLUB GAZETTE. 



status of any candidate. We may as well give notice here 
that those becoming members after this ds^ie will only be 
called upon for one year's subscription between this and 
the commencement of 1880. 



LADIES' CHALLENGE PRIZE. 

This matter having been brought up for discussion in 
Committee, it was decided that the Committee had not the 
slightest intention of interfering with the proposition of 
A. L. 0. B. 

Members will, therefore, please distinctly understand 
that no action will be taken by the Committee, and, this 
being settled, we can only appeal to members to support 
such a spirited enterprise, and induce their fair relations 
to contribute to the good cause. 

Subscriptions are to be sent to A. L. 0. B., care of 
. W. T. Thorn, Jun., 11, Ladbroke Square, W. 



BECKENHAM BICYCLE CLUB RACE MEETING. 

This favourite meeting, as was the case last year, un- 
fortunately clashed with the Surrey B.C. Races, and the 
best riders were attracted to the latter meeting on account 
of the Ten-Miles Scratch Race. Nevertheless, the Open 
Two-Miles Handicap at Beckeuham secured, as regards 
numbers, a good entry, fifty-six names figuring in the 
programme. A large proportion of these, however, were 
members of the local Club, who liad enough to do in one 
afternoon to run in their One and Five-Miles Handicaps, 
and, in consequence, the actual number of starters was only 
twenty-eight. The course, with the exception of the outer 
extremity of the straight run in, which was rather lumpy, 
was in capital condition. The green velvet grass contrasting 
with the autumnal tints of the grand old trees in the 
background, made the grounds look even more charming 
than in the summer, which all who were there then will 
admit is saying a great deal. The Club did not decide 
until the last moment to have a band, when, not having 
time to arrange for the attendance of a good brass band, 
paid a large sum to a London house accustomed to supply 
bands for balls, and the result was one which afiforded not 
a little amusement to the spectators. The strains pro- 
ceeding from a comet and a piccolo were most prominent, 
and these were backed up by a harp, a double bass, and 
several violins. The conductor, in a swallow tail and white 
tie, when not beating time with a drum-stick, energetically 
beat a tambourine. In a ball-room the band would 
doubtless have been first-rate. 

The following is a return of the racing in the open 
event : — 

Heat 1.— J. W. Sharpe, Croydon Ramblers B.C., 
40 yards, 1st ; J. C. Oswald, L.B.C., 155, 2nd ; J. W. 
Potter, L.B.C., 220, 3rd ; T. M. Kemp, 135, 0. Kemp feU 
at starting, and spoilt his chance of winning. Potter went 



fast for a short distance, and then tired. Sharpe overtook 
his men in the second lap of the last mile, and won easily. 
Time, 7 mins. 67 sees. 

Heat 2.— M. Pritchard, Druids, 140 yards, 1st; E. 
Freeth, B.B.C.,- 280, 2nd ; A. Tarling, P.B.C., 50, 3 ; 
H. E. Taylor, Brixton B.C., 225, ; S. J. Pierson, Belgrave 
B.C., 165, ; G. H. Lacey, Kent B.C., 185, ; H. C 
Chater, B.B.C., 230, 0. Pritchard took the lead soon after 
going a mile, and, never being caught, won by eight yards. 
A splendid race between Freeth and Tarling for the second 
place resulted in favour of the former by half a yard. 
Time, 7 mins. 6| sees. 

Heat 3.— F. Badcock, Stanley B.C., 170 yards, 1st; 
T. Gale, Kent B.C., 195, 2nd ; J. N. Flood, Sydenham 
B.C., 250, 0. The last-named was soon out of the hunt, 
leaving Badcock and Gale to walk over in order to qualify 
for the final. 

Heat 4.— P. Nevill, Chesterfield B.C., 170 yards, Ist ; 
C. J. Turner, L.B.C., 90, 2nd ; F. G. Bretton, Eastbourne 
• B.C., 200, 3rd ; A. G. Eve, Pelham B.C., 150, 0. Turner 
rode extremely well on his nickel-plated " Stassen " (mile 
gauge and all), but could not catch Nevill (younger brother 
of our old member, T. G. Nevill), who won by ten yards ; 
Bretton was eight yards belund Turner. This rider, from 
Eastbourne, whose acrobatic costume led the spectators to 
expect at least a double somersault at the winning post, 
disappointed us all, as legs over handles was the greatest 
feat performed. 

Heats.— N. Carr, L.B.C., 185 yards, 1st; W.Webb, 
InvictaB.C, 225, 2nd; E. W. P. Cambridge, I Z. B.C., 
50, 3rd ; J. Griffits, Uni.CoU.A.C., 145, 0. Cambridge did 
not ride in his usual form, and failed to overtake Carr, who 
won by twenty yards from the Invict* man. Carr's first 
attempt at racing leads us to hope for great things from 
him next season, if he goes in for racing, and will train. 
His form may, however, be much improved. Time, 
6 mins. 58^ sees. 

Heat 6.— E. H. Carr, L.B.C., 155 yards, 1st; W. T. 
Thorn, Jun., L.B.C., scratch, 2nd ; W. Brown, Sydenham 
B.C., 210, 5rd ; A. Herbert, L.B.C., 175, ; R. W. Langton, 
B.B.C., 230, ; J. W. Rodda, 275, 0. E. H. Carr followed 
his brother's example, winning his heat by 3 yards only 
from Thorn. The latter rode splendidly throughout 
Herbert, who most men thought should have conceded 
Carr a start, instead of receiving one, rode well and passed 
Carr after being caught by him, but Carr stayed the longest, 
and finished 20 or 30 yards in front of him. Time 7 mins. 
J sees. 

Final Heat.— M. Pritchard, 1;.J. W. Sharpe, 2; F. 
Badcock, 3 ; N. Carr, 4 ; C. J. Turner, ; J. C. Oswald, 0; 
W. Webb, ; T. Gale, ; P. Nevill, ; W. T. Thorn, jun., 
fell. This was a grand race. The scratch man caught Shaipe 
in the second lap, and the pair raced together all the way. 
Thorn made his effort in the last lap, but Shaipe was 



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LONDON BICYCLE CLUB GAZETTE. 



192 



equal to the occasion and actually forced his wheel right * 
ahead, the outside position, however, told its tale, and the 
Londoner entered the straight with a slight advantage. 
Thirty yards from the winning-post Pritchards and Badcock 
were collared hy Thorn on the outside, when the latter, 
losing his treadle on the rough ground, came an awful 
cropper, Sharpe, who was only a yard behind, narrowly 
escaped going over him. 'The three first men were within 
four yards of one another, with N. Carr and Turner close up. 
Had not Thorn fallen he would just have won. The 
winner, after passing the post, failed to get round the 
corner, and landed over the handles into the midst of the 
spectators. Fortunately, he escaped unhurt, and, with the 
exception of a hrtdse caused to a lady's foot hy the wheel 
going over it, none received injury. The machine, how- 
ever, was wrecked by the fall. 



SATURDAY RUNS. 

N.E. DiSTKIOT. 

The last recognised run was little better than its imme- 
diate predecessor. Four members left Sybom's Comer, and 
went by Snaresbrook, Woodford Bridge (where one deserted), 
and Chigwell to Abridge, but as the members who now take 
part in our runs have a habit of having a dinner in view at 
seven o'clock not many miles off it was not deemed necessary 
to stop at Abridge, so the three who were left rode on to 
Passingford Bridge. After a short stop here one went on 
his way to Ongar and two returned by the same road, 
meeting a late member just out of Abridge. The roads 
about Chigwell were not perfect, but that word applied to 
their state between Abridge and Passingford Bridge. 
Without wishing to discourage members from turning up 
on Saturday, I may mention that I am not aware that any- 
one will be at the meeting-place, and I fear we must consider 
our runs at an end. Present : F. Jolly, C. H. F. Christie, 
F. Godlee, T. Godlee. 

Francis Godlee, District Captain. 



N.W. DiSTEICT. 



September 28th. — It is a melancholy duty fo record the 
last fixed run of the season. Essendon, the attractive 
village which allured sixteen men even from Little Berk- 
hampstead, was again visited with much eujoyment. A 
beautiful autumn afternoon was drawing to a close as we 
arrived. Tea witli divers tootlisome accessories was 
promptly supplied, and we became loth to exchange our 
comfortable quarters for the outer darkness. Three mem- 
bers, however, who turned up from a long run round 
Bedfordshire, insisted on a move, and we accordingly 
started, piercing the gloom with many lamps, which, 
besides producing a very pretty effect, were extremely 
necessary. Bacon, who had come from Brighton, was en- 
countered at Bedwell Park. We were disappointed in 



meeting the W. District which was presumed to be racing. 
Distance, 32 miles. Present : Alison, Bacon and brother, 
Buckler, Burrough, Dalton, Freeth, Marchant, Rose, Teget- 
meier, W. J. Williams, and a visitor. 

Notice. — Although the fixed Club-runs are now over, we 
shall continue, as last year, to have meets throughout 
October. The time and place of starting as usual, and the 
extent and destination of the run to be agreed upon by the 
members present. It will be remembered that one or two 
of the most pleasant runs of the year, took place in this 
month. 

J. W. Alison, District Captain. 



S.E. DiSTEICT. 



The run to Godstone was much enjoyed by the solitary 
member who attended it. 

W. Johns. 



LONDON TO TORQUAY AND BACK. 

On Sunday, 8th September, " Patsey " and myself 
" trained " it to Staines, leaving there at 1 1 o'clock, but 
no sooner had we passed Egham than the rain came down, 
and we had to take shelter for nearly an hour. Mounting 
again, dry roads were soon found, and in capital condition, 
through Bagshot and Basingstoke to Andover, 47 miles, 
where we stopped the night. The next day was hard work, 
roads very hilly, but with good surface ; Andover to Salis- 
bury, Blandford, and Piddletown, 51 miles. On the Tues- 
day Piddletown to Dorchester, Bridport, Charmouth, and 
Axminster, 33 miles, roads very hilly with good surfade ; 
most comfortable quarters were found at the '' Old Bell 
Hotel," Axminster, charges very moderate, which hotel we 
can confidently recommend. On the Wednesday Axminster 
to Honiton, good road, but with bad surface, though level to 
Exeter ; the direct road was taken to Newton over Haldon 
Hill (1,818 feet), from which there is a fine view of Exeter 
and the River Exe. I thought we should never get to the 
top, but were amply repaid by the glorious prospect and 
the long descent to Newton ; thence to St. Mary Church 
and Torquay, 50 miles. We had every comfort at the 
"Union Hotel" (charges moderate) at Torquay, and 
spent the next day there exploring the neighbourhood. 
The views from tl^e heights around Torquay, as are well 
known, are most striking, and a stroll on Babbicombe 
Downs by moonlight is a high treat to the lover of the 
picturesque. " Patsey " left me at Torquay to visit his 
friends in Ashburton, returning by himself to town. On 
the Friday, I was glad to travel on a fairly level road from 
Torquay to Newton, Chudleigh, long ascent, tliough 
rideable, up Haldon Hill, with splendid run down, Exeter, 
CuUompton, where a stream of water juns down each side 
of the street, recalling a Dutch town ; surface of road 



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LONDON BICYCLE CLUB GAZETTE. 



rather rough firom Torquay to where the Tiverton and 
Wellington main road is joined, then splendid going 
through Taunton to Durston—sixty miles — where I stayed 
the night. On the Saturday, an easy run was enjoyed to 
Glastonbury, where I had the pleasure of meeting a friend, 
—of the Rovers B.C. — who set me on my way and gave 
me many valuable hints and information of the country 
thereabouts. Leaving my friend at Glastonbury, Wells was 
reached in time for a good dinner at the '' Mitre Hotel " 
(very moderate), and most of the afternoon was spent in 
visiting the town and the Cathedral, one of the most splendid 
Gothic structures in England, the west front in particular 
being much admired. The next stage to Bath (42 miles 
from Durston), through Badstock, I found excellent going, 
in fact it is a very fair road all the way from Taunton to 
Bath. I stayed in Bath a week — it rained nearly every 
day. Perhaps I may mention that there are two roads 
from that place to Bristol, that through Eelston and north 
of the Avon is hilly and rough most of the way, and if 
Clifton is. the destination you have to go all through 
Bristol, a most disagreeable run. It is a capital undulating 
road, with no steep hills, to Bristol through Eejmsham ; 
after crossing the Avon, at Bristol a fair road follows the 
course of- the river under the suspension bridge, with only 
one hill to Clifton Downs ; and another way, instead of 
crossing the river at Bristol is by taking' the road south and 
west of the river, past Clifton Station (G.W.R.), and then 
crossing the water by the suspension bridge. It is a 
pleasant ride and good though hilly road from Clifton to 
Shirehampton, then level and rough surface to Avonmouth, 
where a fine view is obtained of the Channel. Another 
good run is to Portishead. The Hotwells Spring, almost 
under the suspension bridge at Clifton, is well worthy of a 
visit and is only crowded on Sundays and holidays ; a 
good plain lunch, cigars, i^id tobacco c^n be obtained 
here, and many a pleasant hour can be spent there ; 
excellent photos of the suspension bridge and scenery 
around are sold by the proprietor, who does all he can to 
make his guests comfortable. I thought I would go out 
of the beaten track, and not return by the racing road 
from Bath to London ; so, leaving the former place at 
7.20 a.m., I ran to Melksham through Box, thence, via 
Devizes, Lugershall, Andover, Basingstoke, and Staines 
home (105 miles), arriving at 8.10 p.m. after a hard day's 
work. Hilly all the way to Staines, more or less. I think 
that when, say Devonshire, is to be the field for touring, it 
will be found a fairly good road all the way, with very few 
stiff hills to take the Bath road from London, via Newburyi 
and thence to Exeter through Bristol, Highbridge, Bridg- 
tvater, Taunton, and Wellington, the distance being from 
London to Exeter by this route 184 miles, or from Bath to 
Exeter by way of Radstock, Wells, Glastonbury, and 
Taunton, 185 miles. 

"Panns." 



SURREY BICYCLE CLUB MEETING AT THE OVAL. 

Saturday, the 28th ultimo, proved a fine day for the 
Surrey from every point of view. The weather was warm 
and genial, the "gate" was large, the grass course in such 
condition as it has never been inr before, the sport was 
splendid, and the accidents few and trifling ; the ring was 
rigidly kept for the press and officials, a good band was in 
attendance, and punctuality reigned supreme. 

The first event was a Five- Miles Club Handicap for the 
" Wareham" Challenge Cup, for which there were thirteen 
entries, as follows : — 

Yarck 

East, F. T Scratch. 

Hall, E. J. ••• ... ••• ••• 300 

Oxx, G. R 410 

^ Wellbeloved, T 430 

Budd, T. C 450 

Griffith, J. F 460 

Causton, R. T 540 

Jehring, E. 570 

Goodman, M. H 580 

Tilt, W. G 600 

Tomkins, S. J 600 

Vacani, P. 650 

Spyer, N 680 

Of these all came to the post except East, Jehring, and 
Vacani. With so many long starts it was difficult for au 
ordinary spectator to tell who was first at the commence- 
ment, some of the men being, in some cases, more than a 
lap ahead. At half distance, however, the riders were more 
clearly distinguishable, and passed in the following order : 
Griffith, Wellbeloved, Oxx and Budd (dead heat), Causton, 
Spyer, Tomkins, Tilt, and Hall last. Goodman came a 
" cropper ; " Budd stopped at three miles, and Hall slipped 
his saddle. He was, however, soon supplied with another 
machine, and, by a brilliant spurt, drew up some of his 
leeway. He was, however, unable to get past Griffith at 
the end of four miles, who showed, as at Worthing, that he 
was suited on a grass course. Griffith eventually won 
^ anyhow in 17 mins. 12^^ sees., with Oxx second, and 
Wellbeloved third. There was only a second prize, how- 
ever, the present of the Captain. 

The next event was an Open Amateur Handicap of Two 
Miles, for which there were fifty-two entries, and three 
prizes. It was run in seven heats, and as one only in a 
heat started in the final, a real race was secured in each 
contest. 

1st Heat. — H. L. Cortis, Wanderers B.C., 65 yards, 1 ; 
J. Bring, Stanley B.C., 220, 2. At the end of the first 
mile Bring led, followed by Nicol^ Petty, and Cortis. At 
1^ miles Cortis ran into second p^ce. In the last lap but 
one he put it on, and took first place, winning by a yard, 
though he was closely and gamely pressed by the Stanley 
man. Time 6 mins. 35 sees. 



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194 



2nd Heat— T. Kyle, Arion B.C., 180 yards, 1 ; J. A. 
Thompson, Kingston B.C., 220, 2. F. T. East, the scratch 
man, keeping liimself in reserve for the ten miles, did not 
start. Thompson looked uncommonly like winning, but, 
afc the finish, Kyle came with a tremendous rush, and won 
a splendid race by six yards in 6 mins. 34 sees. 

3rd Heat.— G. R Oxx, Surrey B.C., 200 yards, won 
easily in 6 mins. 41 f sees. 

4th Heat.— W. Quirk, Kingston B.C., 10 yards, and J. 
F. Griffith, Surrey B.C., 190 yards, were the objects of 
interest in this heat, the latter winning comfortably however 
in 6 mins. 29 sees., in spite of brilliant riding on Quirk's 
part. 

5th Heat.— T. W. Howard, Civil Service B.C., 210 yards, 
won easily in 6 mins. 46^ sees. 

6th Heat.— Won by G. Beeson, Wanderers B.C., 190 
yards, in 6 mins. 39 sees. 

7th Heat — This was good. E. Runtz, Pickwick B.C., 
170 yards, had all his work to win from T. C. Budd, Surrey 
B.C., 190 yards. Time 6 mins. 40 sees. 

In the final heat, which was run in the dusk, Kyle 
secured first honours with Buntz second, and Beeson third. 
Time 6 mins. 25f sees. 

The event of the day was the Ten Miles Scratch Race. 
The starters were : — 



East, F. T. ... 
W3mdham, W. 
Hall, E. J. ... 
TroUope, R. G. 
Quirk, W. ... 
Derkinderen, A. E. 
Cortis, H. L. ... 
Kemp, S. 
Perceval, A. P. C. 
Beeton, A. C. 
Kent, G. 



Surrey B.C. 
London B.C. 
Surrey B.C. 
London B.C. 
Kingston B.C. 
Tower Hamlets B.C. 
Wanderers B.C. 
Pickwick B.C. 
Wanderers B.C. 
Temple B.C. 
Middlesex B.C. 



East went off at a great pace, followed by Wyndham and 
Hall. In the second lap Derkinderen went second, and 
Cortis first, which position he maintained for another lap and 
then retired. At the completion of the fourth and fifth 
laps Derkinderen led. Quirk then took first place, which 
he held for the sixth, seventh, eighth, ninth, and tenth 
laps. At two miles, Percival turned it up. The eleventh 
and twelfth lap saw a dead heat at the tape between Der- 
kinderen and Quirk. In the thirteenth, fourteenth, fifteenth, 
sixteenth, seventeenth, eighteenth, and nineteenth laps. 
Quirk led, followed by Derkinderen. Kemp gave up in the 
eighteenth, and TroUope in the nineteenth lap. At half 
distance (twentieth lap) the order was — Quirk, Derkinderen, 
East, Hall, and Wyndham last, all men riding without 
distress, and with just sufficient space between to secure 
safety. In the twenty-first lap, East went first ; in the 
twenty-second, Qnirk ; and East again in the twenty-third. 
The changes then began to be rung, the laps being passed 



with the following leaders : 24th, Quirk ; 25th, East ; 
26th, Derkinderen ; 27th and 28th, Quirk (the lead being 
wrested from Derkinderen by a brilliant spurt). Beginning 
the 39th lap (last half mile). East with an astonishing spurt 
shot away at what the time has since proved 'to be over 
twenty miles an hour. Wyndham, however, closed on him, 
and the " Eastender " also was Hot to be shaken off ; and, 
coming with a terrific burst, Derkinderen, amidst the posi- 
tive yells of the excited crowd of spectators, and with an 
outside station, got within one foot of East's front wheel as 
the latter crossed the tape. Wyndham was a good third 
by five yards, and Quirk and Hall were well up. Anything 
approaching the enthusiasm and excitement it has never 
been our lot to witness at an athletic meeting. Time, 35 
min. 34 4*5 sec, the quickest on record for a grass course. 
The last half mile was covered in 1 min. 28 sec. 



THORN'S' RIDE TO THE NORTH. 
After having despatched bicycle to Humber's to be 
repaired, had a good night's rest at the " Elephant Hotel " 
at Doncaster, good and cheap. Waited at Doncaster all 
Monday in expectation of the bicycle being sent. Tuesday 
was spent in the same way ; when, finding it very monoto- 
nous, I went by train to York, where I thoroughly explored 
the town, and attended service in the Minster. Next 
morning, machine arrived at 11 o'clock. On the same day 
(Wednesday), having spanned up, I left the " White Swan" 
(good hotel) at 12 o'clock mid-day for Durham, via Thirsk 
and Northallerton (63 miles), which town was reached at 
eight o'clock in the evening, pitch dark. Good night's rest 
at the " County Hotel" (expensive, but good). Thursday, 
visited Cathedral and Castle, and did not leave till 12 o'clock, 
riding via Newcastle and Morpeth to Alnwick (48^ miles), 
which was reached safely at six o'clock, the roads being 
shamefully loose and stony, and the wind straight in my 
face. Friday, arose at 6.30, and rode round the Duke of 
Northumberland's parks, and left at 9.30 for Belford and 
Berwick, and arrived at Haddington at six o'clock, distance 
66i miles. Saturday morning, rode into Edinburgh, 17 
miles, in one hour and a half. 

Total Hours in the Saddle. 

Sunday 17 hours 163 miles 

Wednesday 8 „ 63 „ 

Thursday 6 „ 48 „ 

Friday 8J „ . 66j „ 

Saturday Ij „ 17 „ 

41 hours 357j „ 

Doncaster to York by train 38 „ 

395| miles 
Roads on the whole were of a shocking description, 
stones being laid thickly for miles at a time, and the rest 
of the road worse than macadam. The wind varied 
considerably, and no reliance could be placed on its help. 



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LONDON BICYCLE CLUB GAZETTE. 



LONDON TO SOUTHAMPTON, ST. MALO, DINAN, 
MAURON, REDON, NANTES, ST. NAZAIRE, 
DERVAL, RENNES, ST. MALO. 

Thursday. Turned out at 8 o'clock, and started at 11, 
having to walk the first mile out of the town on account of 
the paving. To Savemay the road was pretty good, but on 
leaving that place it got awfully bumpy, and continued 
getting worse all the way to St. Nazaire, to add to which 
a strong wind blowing from the west did not improve the 
pace, in fact it was all we could do to keep going at all. 
At St. Nazaire we put up at the " Hotel de Marine," and 
sat down to dinner directly we arrived. During that meal 
we found they had had a regatta in the town that day, and 
that there would be a fair in the evening, we accordingly 
anticipated some fun and we were not disappointed. After 
seeing everything, notably the .'illumination of the ships in 
the harbour, we turned into bed, rather tired, at 11 o'clock- 
Distance 43 miles. 

Friday. Got up at 9.30 a.m. and went down to the sea 
in hopes of getting a bathe, but as the tide was right out 
we had to content ourselves with paddling. After having 
a first-rate fish breakfast, we started for Savernay. We 
had determined to ride with the wind for a treat, and as it 
was still S. W., hence our retracing our steps of the previous 
evening. At Savernay we tacked by taking the train to 
Redon, and then started again for Derval. The road was 
splendid, and, with the wind at our backs, we went along 
in fine style. The last seven miles into Derval was down 
hill, and we could see every inch of the road. This was 
the scene of our last and most successful cow hunt. We 
had overtaken an old woman with our game quietly chewing 
the cud in the ditch, and I had succeeded in passing ; but 
not so Wilson, for the cow, seeing him coming, got up into 
the road, and, after a look round, started at a good trot 
after me,. but in front of Wilson. When that cow went too 
fast I stopped it ; when it went too slow Wilson urged it 
on, and between us it went just on three miles, and there 
we left it waiting for the old woman, whom we could see 
far away up the hill, gesticulating violently. We have 
since come to the conclusion that Wilkinson's proverbial 
" pig hunt " was quite " out of it." ' We reached Derval at 
half-past seven, having done the last 21 miles from Redon 
in an hour and a half. We put up at the *' Hotel des 
Voyageurs," not much of a place to look at, but very clean, 
and as it was the only place in the town we did not have 
much choice. Distance, 38 miles. 

Saturday. After sleeping well, and having a capital 
breakfaat, we got away at 12 o'clock with the intention of 
reaching Rennes. Wilson, who had a very bad attack of 
toothache, thought when he first got up that he would not 
be able to ride, but eventually changed his mind. The 
road was very hilly and badly made to Bain, where we 
stopped for some refreshment. Wilson's toothache now 
came on again worse than ever, and I determined to see 



him into the train at the nearest station. On reference to 
our map I found we could hit the railway at a station 
called Messac, about five miles off, down a lane to the left 
out of the town. After a pretty fair road, with most lovely 
scenery, we arrived there safely, and I saw him into the 
train, with all my luggage as well as his own. I then 
started by mjrself to finish the ride to Rennes. I struck 
the main road between that place and Redon at Loh^c, 
and then got some fine riding for about ten miles to 
Ouignon. Here the hills began again, and for ten miles I 
did nothing but climb mountains, and find .the other side 
too steep to ride down. However, the last ten miles into 
Rennes amply repaid me for my hard work. I found 
Wilson at the "Grand Hotel" (formerly the "Hotel 
Julien "), nearly mad with toothache, so, seeing him to bed 
and after taking dinner by myself, I also was soon in bed 
and fast asleep. Distance, 51 miles. 

Sunday. Wilson was still much too bad to ride, so he 
decided to get his tooth taken out if possible. With the 
help of a waiter we succeeded in finding out an old man in 
a back slum, who said, " Oh, yes, he could take a tooth 
out." And so he did, but not very scientifically, I'm 
afraid. Wilson felt so bad afterwards that I decided to go 
with him by train to St. Malo. Catching the 3.35 p.m. 
train, we were soon once more at the town we started from, 
just in time for table cFhSte dinner at the " Hotel Franklin." 

We stopped at St. Malo until Wednesday, amusing 
ourselves with bathing, sight-seeing, etc. We left on 
Wednesday evening by the same boat we came over in, 
and arrived at Southampton on Thursday morning, after a 
calm passage of thirteen hours. Catching the 11.30 train 
for London, we got out at Woking, Wilson to ride to our 
cottage, and I to Wargrave-on-Thames, at which places we 
duly arrived safely. 

The luggage we carried we found ample. Wilson had an 
M. L P. bag. I had, as well as that, a large waterproof 
bag over the handles, which held a tremendous lot of 
clothing. We rode no great distance, but thoroughly 
enjoyed ourselves, and, with the exception of the tooth 
business, shall always look upon our trip in 1878 as a 
perfect success. 

W. J. MULLKB. 

Hotels. — Having just returned from a tour, I may 
mention that I have found the two following hoteLs Al, 
toth for very moderate charges and excellent accommo- ' 
dation, viz., the " Old Bell," at Axminster, and the "Ship," 
at Crediton. At Piddletown the " King's Arms " may be 
recommended (I believe it is the only house of the kind in 
the town), and at Torquay I found the " Union " good and 
moderate. On' looking over some old numbers of the 
Gazette I notice that the " George," at Andover, is recom- 
mended. From my own experience I should be inclined to 
caution members against it. — " A Wicklow Boy." 



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LONDON BICYCLE CLUB GAZETTE. 



196 



ANSWER TO DOUBLE ACROSTIC. 

T estimonia L 

H avan A 

E dwar D 

L azzaron I 

whyhe E 

N ervou S 

D is C 

at H 

N euralgi A 

B el L 
nitia 



I 

C 

Y 

C 

L 

E 

C 

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P 

roppe R 

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* The London Bicycle Club Ladies' Challenge Prize.' 



Correct answers to the first Acrostic of last week have 
been received from A. S. Ister and E. P. C. 



Oct. 



Oct. 



RACING FIXTURES. 

5th. — One Mile Handicap, Lillie Bridge. First 
prize, New Bicycle. Entries (28. 6d.) to be 
made before September 28th to Messrs. 
Humber, Marriott, and Cooper, the pro- 
moters. Handicapper — Mr. M. D. Riicker, 
Jan. 
12th. — Brighton Athletic Club. Sussex County 
Cricket Ground. Two Miles Handicap. 
Handicapper, M. D. Riicker, Jun. Entries 
(2s. 6d.) close on October 4th, to J. Saunders, 
Jun., 2, Montpelier Street, Brighton. 

Oct. 12th. — Clapham Bicycle Club. Stamford Bridge. 
One Mile Handicap. Handicapper, M. D. 
Riicker, Jun. Entries (2s. 6d.) to be sent to 
Mr. L. M. MacGan, 157, Brixton Road, 
S.W., before 5th October. 

Oct. 19th.— Race Meeting at Eennington Oval, in aid of 
the Sufferers by the Abercame Colliery Ex- 
plosion. One and Three Miles Handicaps 
(Handicapper, M. D. Riicker, Jun.), and Five 
Miles Scratch Race. Entries (2s. 6d. each 
event) can be sent to M. D. Rucker, Jun., 
before October 12th. 

Oct. 26th.— Inter-Club Races C.U.Bi.C. v. L.B.C. One, 
four, and fifteen miles. Cambridge Ground. 



SATURDAY MEETS. 

Wbstbrn Disteict. 

< On October 12th (full moon) a party will ride to Peters- 
field (for Stonor Hill) by the direct Portaanouth road, over 
Hind Head, etc., returning over splendid roads the following 
day. I shall be glad to receive names of members wishing 
to join the trip. 

W. A. Smith, District Gaptun. 



EXCHANGE LIST. 



(Two Insertions, not exceeding three lines, for Is.) 

52-inch/* Norwood," half-bright, in splendid condition* 
good as new. Roller and cone bearings. Front lever brake. 
Rat-trap pedals. £12.— V. D. F., 41, Finborough Road, 
West Brompton, London, S.W. 

For Sale. — 57-inch new racing "Humber," £i2; also 
56-inch semi-racer "Humber," £10.— Address, Gilbert F. 
Beck, Chislehurst. 

54-inch " Stassen," all latest improvements, price £ll. 
Any fellow^ wanting a good machine cheaply had better 
have a look at this one. — ^H. V. Cleaver, 20, Ladbroke 
Road, W. 

My 56-in. Norwood, new recently. Too large ; am pur- 
chasing smaller of same maker. Weight 46lbs. complete. 
Perfectly sound in every respect. Price iPl2. — ^A Ogier 
Ward. 



ANSWERS TO CORRESPONDENTS. 

A WiCKLOW BoT.— Tour statements about the "George" 
would be pretty near a libel, so we have modified them. 

M. — ^We are reluctantly compelled to decline your verses 
as scarcely appropriate. 

H O'N. — We must refer yoiir query to next Committee 
meeting, but we don't anticipate any difficulty. 



NOTICE TO CORRESPONDENTS. 

All contributions must be addressed to "The Editors, 
L.B.C. Gazette, 35, Eastcheap, E.C," and must bear the 
name of the author, though not necessarily for insertion. 

They must be written on one side of the paper only^ 
and, if immediate insertion is desired, must be received not 
later than Tuesday morning. 



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LONDON BICYCLE CLUB GAZETTE. 



G- O 

BICYCLE OUTFIHER, CLUB UNIFORMS, 

AND SUNDRIES. 

PU RCH ASE 

TOUR 

BIC7CLE 

ON 

GOV'S NEW PLAN. 

All the Best Makes at Mannfactorer's Prices. 
By atrangement with the Manufacturers orders have the same 
attention as if forwarded direct to the Works, thus saving the buyer 
a deal of trouble. 

IMMEDIATE DELIVERY. 
Write for Particulars and Price Liett. 



TRICYCLES for Ladies or Gentlemen. 
YOUTHS' BICYCLE S. 

GOY'S CLUB ROOM, 

MOST CBKTBALLT 8ITUATID. 

Offered FREE to Officers of all Clubs to arrange Matches, 
Committee Meetings, Ac. 



PHtVER'S EXQUISITE MANUS ALBA (REGISTERED). 

THE HAVSS.— PBivn't Maws Aima Insmw bavoCIAiI, white, aolt hsBdf to all, no taaMtr of what 
oeeapatlon ; • parfbci eituutr of. and oomfoti to, Um ddn. THI FBKT.— Pmm's UAwm Alba !■ 
a pomC booB to all whoM fact grow waaiy throMh walklnc or ■taading long. It proraa a perftet 
eloajiMr of, and eomftntar to, tlw feaC THE HAIIL— Pmraa'a Uamv Alba la tha aaeat parfiNt 
cleaaaar of tha habr, ramoTM dandiiff and all impiiritiaa. 

Bold byalIChflmlalaaiidI%rftuncn,lBtoUataaac«.atlf,la6d, h, fcSd, 8k6d. 1^ R»t 1« Id, li M, 
!• 8d. !• M, la M ftom tha Sola WholoMla Agwit- 

J. MASON, xao, Goldhawk Road, Shepherd's Bosh, London, W. 
If.m.—JLU tha ToOat OatM ar« alagaai Baelro-FUtad Gooda. Handaoma Preaaata. 
AoBim-Oojr.lLLaadanhan Street. E.C.; Crooka * Co.. 87, Pnad-ttiaat, W. : HIU * Son, 4, Hay 
iiiarkai.S.W.; J.UehtaBfcM, Cmtal Palaea Baiaar, Oslbfd-atrart ; J, Butler, 61, Qoaaa'a-raad, 



St. John'a-wood ; Barrow * Co., High itract, Xnuingf 



Howard A Co., Charlaa-atrcat, Hatton- 



^ , ---_ , _ POalngtoil ; Howara • w., vi»rA«B-Btiv 

gBfdan, X.C : T. Clara, 70, Tendnireh ■tract, S C : Thiaitay'a Tollat aub, Chaaing-eioai 
all tha MatropoUtan RaUway Uvatorlaa ; of moat Chamlali. A0SNT8 WANTED. 

A BOON TO BICYCLISTS. 

BICYCLE RIDING TAUGHT PERFECTLY 

AT TH« 

Ginrz- BicnroLEJ soecool 

The largest in London. 

Sinsrle Leeson, Is. 6d. Perfect Biding gruaranteed, 10s* 

Address-GHEQUBB YABD, 
OPPOSITE ALDGATE METROPOLITAN STATION, 

ALDGATE HIGH STREET. 

TEAOHER-PROFE880R T. QUINTON. 

CHAMPIOy OBNAMgNTAL RIDER. 

THE EMPRESS 

Is acknowledged as the best Roadster. Strong, durable, and easy run- 
ning. Always gives satisfaction. Strongly recommended by members 
of London Bicycle and other Clubs. 

Sole Agent : T. A. 8M ILY, D ALSTON JTJITCTIOH, E. 

THE NORWOOD. 

A newly-designed light Roadster. A very elegant machine. Will 
stand plenty of work. Weight of 52-inch, 40 lb. City Agent : — 



/ 21, LEADENHALL STREET, 1 t^„^,„ pp 
t 54, LIME STREET, / ^^^^^> ^•^• 



W. KEEH, Empress Bicycle Works, Norwood Jnnction, S.E. 
Price Lists, One Stamp. 



THE BICYCLE OF THE DAY FOR 1878 IS J. STASSEN'S " NONPAREIL" 

The only machine fitted with Screwless Spokes, warranted not to break 
or loosen ; patent eccentric brakeeasily applied and wonderfully effective ; 
new patent double-coned adjustable steering gear ; best red rubber tyres, 
frictionless bearings, and all latest improvements. Every bicyclist ought 
to possess our Patent Circular-wheel Valise. These machines are made 
for work, and are the best and cheapest machines, as they require no 
repairs and never get out of order, and are strongly recommended by 
Members of the London Bicycle Club, and by all who have used them. 
Weight of machine, from 40 lb. or from 1 lb. per inch. 

City Agent: GOT, 21. Leadenhall Street ^ 
PEASES, Princes S treet, Leicetter Square, London, W. 

J. STASSEN &SON, 261. EUSTON ROAD, N.W. 

Factory Entrancb : BEAUMONT PLACE. 
Prospectus 1 d., with Photo. 8d. All sizes kept in stock ready for delivery. 

T. A. SMILY, DALSTON JUNCTION, LONDON, 

BICYCLE AOBMT, AKD 

MANUFACTURER OF THE "TRAVELLER" ANO "TOURIST" BICYCLES. 

Specially adapted for Travellers (oommeroial and others) and Tourists. 



Price Lists of these and other Bicycles, post free. 

'— 1 BiCTcle, and of •" ' ~ 

appucation* 



Photos of "Traveller " No. 1 Bicycle, and of John Keen, post free, on 



IF 



Toa wlah la parehaH a saw bkvola; 
Toa viah to pnrehaae a HOond-baBd 
Toa wlah to wll a Mcyela: 
Yon wlah to axdianta a blejrele; 
Yob wlah to obtain any bicycling aiiBdry; 
Yob with to pnt up at a raapectabla Hoti 
Yob wiah to know whera to aand on yoBT 
YoB wlU take afdrioarou wiU 



toj 



OR 



la you « . 
CONSULT 

ETNERINCTON & CO.'S BICYCUSTS' DIRECTORY GUIDE, AND EXCHANCL 

YOUR THOUSAND GIVlN AWAY 'WISKLY. 

To ba oMaiaad aft Afanta, Depota» Ac, or on appUeation to tha pablUhan. Ithaiti«taB A Oa., latt 

Tampla Chainbata, Whltefciara Str— t, Ylect Straat, B.O. 

IMPORTANT TO ALL. 
HABBISOH S AHTI-COEEOSIVE PASTE, 

for Preventing Rust, 6d., Is., and Is. 9d. 

HAKEI80V8 POLISHING POWSEB 

instantly removes Rust and Corrosion from Metals, and tcft Polishing 
Glass, 6d., Is., and Is. 9d. (see advertisement in "Bidding Times.*') 

Free by post for 8, 14, and 24 stamps, of 

BHIBTCIIFP 9t CO., 66, Goldhawk Bead, Shepherds Bush, London, W. 

THE 

GREAT WESTERN BICYCLE DEPOT, 

87, PRAED STREET, 

PADDINGTON, W. 

( Three minutes* walk from Great Western and Praed Street 

Railway Stations,) 

Pbopbietobb : 

CROOKE & CO., 

AGEirrS FOB ALL FIEST-CLASS BICYCLES 
AND TBICTCLES. 



BICYCLES BOUGHT, SOLD, OR EXCHANGED. 

BICYCLES LET ON 'HIRE. 

Bepairs promptly executed by competent Workmen. 

CHA.HGEB MODEBATE. 

BICYCLE SUNDRIES OF EVERY DESCRIPTION. 



Price Lists on Application. 

Within three minutes* walk oj Edgware Poad, Praed Street 

(Metropolitan), and Great Western Pailway Stations, 
London, 1878. 



Printed for the Proprietors by Dabuvg ft SoK, at the Minerva Statm 
Printing Office, 35, Eastcheap, London, E.C.^October 81, 1878. 



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FOR PRIVATE OtROULATION ONLY. 



" Tengage done torn d, Sviter dans leura eeriis toute persmnalit^, toute alltmon dSpassant Us limites de la discussion la 

plus sincire et la plus courtaise" — ^Laboulbkne. 



Vol. I. No. 31.] 



[Thursday, November 14, 1878. 



CONTENTS. 
PAas 

L.B.C. Aimaal Dinner 211 

To the Paris Exhibition and Back (Condudtd) 212 

Bonnd- About Rambles 213 

Ten Days' Tonr Bonnd Central England 215 

Committee 217 



Notioe->Special General Meeting 217 

Answers to Bmied 'Cyclists 217 

Correspondence 217 

Answer to Correspondent 217 

Notice to Correspondents 217 



L.B.a ANNUAL DINNER. 

Although notice was given of the dinner in the last 
Oazette, there are some memhers who either have not 
looked at the Gazette at all, or who, in skimming through 
it, missed seeing the notice ; and a day or two ago one man, 
\then asked if he had taken a ticket, said he had not heard 
anything about the dinner. This may be the cause of a 
few members not applying for tickets ; but the names of 
some who usually take great interest in all Club doings are 
conspicuous on the list only by their absence. The executive 
have taken pains to eradicate faults which were apparent 
last year, and they naturally expect the support of the Club. 

The day fixed is Wednesday, 20th inst. ; place, Gros- 
venor Gallery, New Bond Street ; time, 6.30 p.m. 

The tickets are 7s., 6s. 6d. being the price of the dinner 
per head, and the 6d. is for the attendance. Some few 
have sent 7s. 6d. in mistake. 

It has been asked if members' fathers or elderly relatives, 
who take an interest in the Club, can have tickets. It is 
scarcely necessary to say that they will be very welcome. 

The positions at table will, as last year, be so arranged 
that friends may be together, and anyone wishing for any 
particular position should write at once to the Hon. Sec. 

Mr. Smith has been well supported by performers, instru- 
mental and vocal, and has arranged a capital programme of 
music. 

It is hoped that those who have not already applied for 
tickets will do so at once, so that there may be at least as 
many present as last year. • 

M. D. Rt^CESB, Jun.^ Captain. 



N.W. DiSTEICT. 

As already notified, there will be a social meeting at 
"Jack Straw's Castle," Hampstead, next Saturday (16th). 
Tea at ,6 o'clock. It will be understood that any members 
of the Club or their friends will be cordially welcomed. 
J. W. Alison, District Captain. 



S.E. DiSTEICT. 

iV(W. P^A.— Probably the filthy state of the roads in and 
around Croydon will account for the small number of four 
members, who met at the Central Station on Saturday last 
for the run to Sevenoaks. These left at five minutes past 4, 
and after pushing through oceans of mud for about two 
miles, found the roads in the country in very fair condition, 
so the labour expended in reaching them was by no means 
thrown away. The route taken was by way of West 
Wickham, Hayes Common, and Famborough. At the last 
named place the Blackheath Division— consisting of one 
member, the District-Captain, and a friend— was found 
waiting. The members were counting on the pleasure of 
a run once more with the District Captain, but he quickly 
dashed their hopes to the ground by declaring his intention 
of returning home with his friend, and the appeals of all 
present were ineffectual in persuading him to alter his 
determination. At Green Street Green two more members 
joined, making the party up to seven. The long four miles 
rise to " The Polhill Arms" was in good order, but the run 
down to Dunton Green was spoiled by numerous patches of 
freshly laid stones. On arrival at Riverhead it was decided 



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LONDON BICYCLE CLUB GAZETTE. 



In reply, Mr. Riicker said there was one thing he regretted. 
It was that Mr. Paget was not there that evening to see 
what class of men it really was that he condemned. He. 
believed that half the objections to bicyclists arose from 
ignorance, but we must not forget that 40 or 50 years ago 
athletics were as nothing, and the men of that time could 
scarcely now be expected to exhibit much enthusiasm for 
sports the pleasures of which they had never personally 
experienced. He was acquainted with many members of the 
L.B.C., and was glad of the circle of friends with whom his 
son associated, and who were always welcome at Oakleigh. 

Mr. Marchant then proposed " The Chairman," and The 
Honourable Ion Keith-Falconer, replying, observed that he 
did not see as much of the Club as he could wish, but he 
must say he had never known any social gathering pass off 
so successfully as this dinner. 

" Our Musical Friends " were then toasted by Mr. Cyril 
J. Turner, and Mr. W. A. Smith responded, paying a very 
just tribute to the exertions of Mr. Wright, of the 
Kingston B.C., on that occasion, for he had at a moment's 
notice undertaken the accompaniment of the songs. 

** Auld Lang Syne " in true Highland style brought the 
affair to a close about a quarter before twelve. 

Between the speeches the company were treated to songs 
by various members, which in shopman's language were of 
" very superior quality." The two successes of the evening 
were " The three Crows in a Cornfield," sung by Messrs. 
W. A. Smith, Beckley, and Thompson, which was enthu- 
siastically encored, and a topical song by the Captain. 

Mr. Riicker's lucubrations in this line are well known, 
but this year he was peculiarly happy. He parodied the 
songs in " H.M.S. Pinafore" (which most have doubtless 
seen performed), commencing as follows : — 

Capt I am the Captain of the L.B.C. 

Clwrus, And a right good Captain, too. 

Capt. You are very, very kind, and I hope you'll bear 
in mind 
That you are a right good crew. 

Chorus, We are very, very, etc. 

Capt. I am never known to fear, 
As my bicycle I steer, 
And fly down the steepest hill ; 
I never miss a meet. 
In snow, rain, or sleet. 
And I never, never have a spilL 

Chorus. What! never! 

Capt. No ! never ! 

Chorus, What ! never ! 

Capt. Well I Hardly ever ! 

We need scarcely say that this was received with great 
applause. 

Other songs from the same work were made to contribute 
in a similar way, but they require to be heard to be fiilly 
appreciated. 



The meeting was in every respect satisiisM^tory, and we can 
only say that those who were not there lost a very pleasant 
evening. This Club Dinner ought to be well supported 
amongst us, for this reason, that it is one of the very few 
occasions when the various districts are brought into 
contact. But for some such opportunities there would be 
great risk of a fee|ling of disunion arising, and those men 
who consider it a desirable thing to call themselves 
members of the London Bicycle Club should do all they 
can to foster intercourse between the various districts, as 
without that they might as well belong to a small club of 
immediate.neighbours. 



LONDON ATHLETIC CLUB. 

This Club held their winter meeting on Saturday last, at 
Stamford Bridge, in wretched weather, when none but 
enthusiasts would have stood for two hours watching the 
sport. Nevertheless the attendance was good, and although 
in a decided minority there were more ladies present than 
could have been expected. 

As usual the programme included a Bicycle Handicap 
(2 miles), but with so few riders in training it is not sur- 
prising that the entry was a poor one. The path was very 
heavy, and the time for Cortis's mile, Smins. 2 sees., is, 
under the circumstances, one of the best performances of 
the year. Although conceding starts varying from 70 to 
300 yards, he had caught his men and was leading at the 
end of the first mile. Appended are the details. 

Two MuBS Bicycle Handicap. 

Heat 1 : H. L. Cortis, Wanderers B.C., scratch, 1 ; 
H. Meyer, Temple B.C., 210 yds, 2 ; B. Beckton, Arion 
B.C., 200, ; J. HiU, Surbiton B.C., 220, ; T. W. Hick- 
man, Kingston B.C., 280, 0. Cortis soon overhauled Meyer, 
and, riding easily, beat him by 7 yards. Time 6min. 50secs. 

Heat 2 : E. A. Runtz, Pickwick B.C., 70 yds, 1 ; J. F. 
Griffiths, Surrey B.C., 160, 2 ; P. de Colmar (late Bel- 
grave, B.C.), 230, 3 ; P. Briant (introduced), 200, 0. This 
heat resulted in a good race between Runtz and Griffiths, 
the former winning by a yard. De Colmar, who was fancied 
to win the handicap, was 30 yards behind. Time 6min. 55sec. 

Heat 3 : G. R. Oxx, Surrey B.C., 85 yards, 1 ; E. S. 
Hassall, Speedwell and Birmingham A.C., 160, 2 ; 
W. Butcher, Trafalgar B.C., 300, 3; J. W. Sharpe, 
Croydon B.C., 75, ; J. B. P. Medinger, Alliance B.C., 200,0; 
C. E. Liles, Temple B.C., 230, 0; H. J. Slocombe, Arion B.C., 
240, ; J. S. Oxx, Surrey B.C., 280, 0. This heat pro- 
duced the best race of the day. Butcher, a strong rider, 
who evidently liked the heavy going, held a commanding 
lead until the last lap, when Ozx and the Birmingham man, 
spurting against each other, caught him rounding the 
corner for the straight, and after a rare struggle Ozx was 
declared the winner by a yard, Hassall being second, half a 
yard in advance of Butcher. Time, 6 min. 40 sec. 



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Pinal Heat : Cortis, 1 ; Meyer, 2 ; Hassall, 3 ; Runtz, 4; 
Oxx, 5 ; Griteths, 6. Cortis weat ofiF at such a tremendous 
pace that he soon got amongst his men, and led by a yard 
at the end of a mile. Meyer, riding very gamely, stuck to 
him, and was ultimately beaten by only fifteen yards, 
Hassall being third a similar distance behind ; Hassall only 
just beat Runtz and Oxx, a yard dividing the three. 
Time, 6min. 30 sec. 

M. D. Riicker, jun., made the handicap, and it is posi- 
tively the last that he will frame. He finds that he cannot 
spare the time which it is necessary to devote to the care- 
fully recording of every rider's performances, and without 
which success in handicapping is very uncertain. Every 
bicycle .handicap instituted by the L.A.C. has been made 
by Mr. Riicker, and these especially he regrets having to 
discontinue. We think his decision a wise one. If he 
were to undertake handicapping for one club he could not 
well refuse others, and while congratulating him on the 
successes he has achieved, we heartily approve of his 
resolution. It will, no doubt, be difficult to find a successor, 
as few men would give up so much time to such an onerous 
and thankless office. 



THE EXHIBITION AT THE AGRICULTURAL 
HALL. 

Perhaps too much ought not to be expected at a first 
attempt, but assuredly a more disadvantageous period could 
scarcely have been chosen for an Exhibition of Bicycles. 

Of the contest going on within the ring we shall say 
little : let those who approve of a man becoming a mere 
machine expatiate on the glories to be gained by such a 
match in other columns than these. As a proof, if proof 
were needed, of the immense superiority as a means of 
locomotion of the bicycle over Shanks' pony, Cann's 
achievement is decisive, but it is awful to think what a 
man's brain or want of brain must be to enable him to 
stand such a task. 

We visited the hall on the Tuesday when not all the 
exhibitors had taken up their positions, but we examined 
some twenty or thirty varieties of bicycle, and the point 
which struck us most was this : There were not half a 
dozen machines in the show with anything like finish in 
their various parts. 

This remark applies even to the exhibits of well-known 
makers, and, in fact, anyone acquainted with machinery 
cannot fail to observe in any collection of bicycles the great 
lack of neatness in the fittings. In many of the less-known 
makes there was a suspicious appearance of coarse soft 
metal, and we left the hall convinced that a high-priced 
machine must be the best in the long run. 

The prizes were awarded as follows. Racers : 1, Humber 
and Co., of Nottingham ; 2, John Keen ; 3, James Carver, 
of Nottingham. Roadsters : 1, John Keen ; 2, Humber 
and Co. ; 3, D. Rudge, of Wolverhampton. 



These awards have given great dissatisfaction, and we 
don't wonder at it. We should very much like to procure 
a list of the judges, of the machines ridden by each, and of 
the votes they gave. We fancy it would be instructive. 

Amongst novelties and appliances we must notice the 
portable bicycle by Grout. It is very ingenious, but hardly 
requisite, we think, and the number of joints necessary 
cannot be a source of strength to the machine. We also 
remarked that the new "suspension" saddle is now fitted 
with ventilating holes. 

Apropos of this we should really feel obliged by a few 
experiences of this saddle. The first man we saw on it was a 
novice, but he complained that the corners of the frame- 
work came out too abruptly, and in a long ride were 
painfully prominent, especially if the saddle became soaked 
with wet. Perhaps someone of experience will favour us 
with his opinion. The Centaur saddle-clip is a simple but 
somewhat heavy contrivance, but those who don't mind a 
pound or two extra for the sake of additional security, and 
the facility it affords of rapidly shifting the saddle either 
forwards or backwards, will do well to examine it. 

Regarded as a first essay, the recent Exhibition is not 
perhaps altogether a failure, inasmuch as it has afforded an 
opportunity of comparison between various classes of ma- 
chines; and if, in consequence, some of the cheap ones went 
to the wall, probably a benefit would accrue to the 'cycling 
community. But as a satisfactory means of deciding upon 
the best machine very few will regard it, especially when 
they learn that a meeting of Exhibitors has since been held, 
and a resolution carried unanimously to the effect that the 
awards were not considered satisfactory. Had a trio of 
bicyclists, who have tried many different classes of machines^ 
and who have some knowledge of machinery, been 
appointed, a very different result would, we believe, have 
been arrived at, but to appoint on the jury, men whose sole 
claim is their celebrity on the road or path was manifestly 
injudicious. 



NOTICE. 

Arrangements have been made for holding social meetings 
on Saturday evenings at the " Warrington," Maida Vale. 
There is a good room, with a piano ; and a meat tea will 
be provided at a very reasonable rate. The " Warrington" 
is at the N.E. end of Warrington Crescent, about ten 
minutes' walk from Bishop's Road Station, and rather less 
from St. John's Wood Road Station. Kilbum 'buses pass 
the end of Stranraer Place, within two minutes' walk. 
The locality should be about equally convenient for W. and 
N.W. men, and the facility of access offers advantages to 
members of other districts. The meetings hitherto held at 
" Jack Straw's Castle " will, at any rate for the present, 
be discontinued. The next meeting will take place at 
the *' Warrington," on Saturday, 14tli inst., at 6 p.m. 



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N.W. District. 

The first social eyeniog meeting took place on Saturday, 
16th nit. Fourteen xnemhers and one visitor attended 
and passed the evening very pleasantly. Messrs. Smith 
and Thorn heing present, there was some good music. Mr. 
Newman also (who has developed a bass voice of astonishing 
profundity) rendered some standard songs with good effect, 
and, indeed, there was no lack of vocal talent. A good 
player would have been appreciated, but this deficiency 
will be well supplied next Saturday. It is in contempla- 
tion to extend the advantages of these meetings by holding 
them in conjunction with the Western District, in a neigh- 
bourhood easily accessible to a large number of men — 
probably at the " Warrington," Maida Vale, or at some 
other place, of which due notification will be given. 

J. W. Alison, District Captain. 

On Saturday, Nov. 23rd, a few members had a short 
run as far as Bell Bar. A good tea at a reasonable charge 
was obtained at Potter's Bar (the second inn on the right). 
Tea, followed by a comfortable talk over the fire, made us 
rather reluctant to face the freezing atmosphere' outside. 
The plunge being made, a pleasant ride home terminated a 
very enjoyable run. The roads were in grand condition, 
although so late in the year. Present : H. G. Freeth, 
E. H. Hindley, W. I. Williams, one visitor, and yours 
faithfully, Aethub K Buokleb. 

25th November, 1878. 



S.E. DiBTBier. 



The members of this District seem determined to keep 
up their reputation of "all weather" riders — for no 
amount of rain, stones, etc., have prevented the usual 
short winter runs on Saturday afternoons. On the 16th 
November five men rode to Reigate in company, and 
reported the roads first rate. On the 23rd November the 
Croydon and Blackheath divisions, eight men in all, rode to 
Westerham, and had tea at the '* King's Arms " for the 
moderate sum of 2s. a head. Last Saturday, 30th Novem- 
ber, it was arranged to have a tea and social evening at 
" The Bell," Bromley, after short runs in the neighbour- 
hood, although the roads were in a shocking state. By 6.30 
fifteen men had put in an appearance, tea was soon served 
in first-rate style at 2s. 6d., and then music and songs were 
the order of the evening, breaking up about ten. It is 
hoped many more will be present at the next meeting 
(14th December), and that men will brush up their songs 
and music for the occasion. Members present on the 30th 
inst. : A. W. Barrett, Beck, J. F. Butler, A. D. Butler, 
Dicker, R. G. Francis, E. Herbert, Kinder, Oswald, 0. E. 
Parker, R. J. Scott, Turner, Ward, Wyndham, and a friend. 

Next Saturday. 7th December, the run is to Riverhead 
via Polhill, putting up at the " Amherst Arms." 



A CIRCULAR RUN, 
Including Petersfield, Nurstead, ffarting, Bogate, Mid- 
hurst, Cowdry Park, Petwarth, Limbo, North Chapel, 
Chiddingfold, Witley to Godalming — about S9 miles, 
Saturday, the 2nd November, was a curious day indeed. 
Favoured with a lovely morning, it turned off to rain at 
3 p.m., at which hour I was just ready to start from Acton 
to Halting md Famham and Woolmer Forest. As I was 
equipped for my journey, I decided to start at 3.30 p.m., 
and found the roads very heavy to Guildford. I did not 
alight until arrived at Ripley, where I had a cup of tea, etc. 
Just as I was leaving, Messrs. Cortis and Sopper walked in 
minus bicycles. My next dismount was beyond the 
hospital on the Hog's Back, the road being so heavy that 
I found it impossible to surmount that steep pitch. After 
passing the Puttenham turn the roads became dry, and 
continued so the rest of my journey, which I accomplished 
without another dismount, the surface of the splendid road 
through Woolmer and Lyss being perfect, and enabling me 
to reach Petersfield at 9.40 p.m., glad to get something 
to eat and drink. From Petersfield to Nurstead the road 
bears to the left, at the far end of the town, and is un- 
dulating and extremely good, past the large pond, and on 
to Stembridge. From Stembridge to Nurstead Rocks is a 
stiff pull up ; the road, being deeply shaded by rocks and 
trees, is very seldom dry : it is very beautifril in the summer 
and autumn. I stayed at Nurstead until 1.15 next 
day, and rode over the roads mentioned at the head of this 
article. From Nurstead the road to Harting winds to the 
right, and descends a long easy incline, with good surfiEkce, 
which continues for some distance, it then rises gradually 
and fiftlls again to Harting (here that terrific ascent 
Harting Hill is seen on the right). The road then bears 
to the left, and after some steep ups and downs Rogate is 
reached. The roads here are mended with sandstone^ and 
when nicely dry, after rain, as when I rode on them, are 
splendid running — the surface until Trotton is passed being 
undulating, with one stiff hill up and a grand run down, 
quite safe, and winding round to the right. On the right 
hand for miles and miles are the great South Downs, the 
road at Cocking, which goes right over them, being veiy 
conspicuous. From Trotton there is hardly a bit of level. 
On reaching Midhurst the road to the left must be taken, 
and after about half a mile Cowdry Park is reached. The 
short route to Petworth runs through this charming park ; 
it is very hilly, but the surface first rate. Below, on the 
right hand, are the fine ruins of Cowdry Abbey. At the 
end of the park a stiff incline leads up to the gate, and 
the same character of surface is found all the way to Pet- 
worth ; in one place there is a long descent through a 
rocky ravine, and on the left is seen a quaint church tower 
with curious flying buttresses. At Petworth Lord Lecon- 
field's magnificent mansion and park attract attention ; the 
park is full of deer, and is most picturesque. The chiuch 



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also is a very hondflome building. The road to Qodalming 
bears abruptly to the left round the church, and as far 
as surface is concerned is not to be surpassed, and I hoped 
I should be able to knock off the 16 miles in about one- 
and-a-half hours, but it proved a delusion. After a few 
miles I found it most frightfully hilly, and although I 
struggled up and back-pedalled down, progress was not 
rapid ; certainly it gave one a chance of enjoying the grand 
scenery of Blackdown, etc., away on the left. Arrived at 
North Chapel, there was a regular teaser of a hill, and no 
sooner had I surmounted this than, without any corres- 
ponding descent, up rose another, far worse than the last, 
and which was almost too much. This is called Cripple 
Crouch Hill. The run down the other side was both long 
and steep, but I was getting reckless, so made up my mind 
to run all the rest, and did so, thereby making up a little 
lost time. At a village called Chiddingfold I tried to obtain 
milk, but could not, but got some capital Burton ale. 
After passing this place a splendid view of Hind Head is 
seen on the lefb. There is then a long descent, followed 
by two hills close together ; the first I rode, but Wormly 
Hill (the second) I was obliged to walk (this was the only 
one which beat me). The other side was steep, and I went 
down at a rare pace, and found it more level through 
Witley to Milford. Here the road, which had up to the 
present been dry, became wet and fearfuUy heavy, and it 
seemed to me as if there had been heavy rain during the 
night or day. This 16 miles is about the heaviest piece of 
riding I have tried — ^it took me more than two-and-a-half 
hours, sheer hard work, all against the wind. From 
Oodalming I rode by direct road viai Guildford and 
Kingston, reaching Acton at 10.10 p.m., thoroughly tired 
out, the last 37 miles being ridden through thick mud. 
Total distance 134 miles. 

W. A. Smith. 

P.S. — The scenery along this route is really so fine that 
if anyone has a long day and can take it easy I can 
strongly recommend it, but to have to ride, as I had, against 
time, was far firom enjoyable. 



At the Special General Meeting of the Club held on the 
28th November, a resolution was passed that the question 
before the meeting should be deferred till the next Annual 
General Meeting, but that if circumstances require it the 
Committee be recommended to make the Annual General 
Meeting "special" for the purpose of taking the matter 
into further consideration. 



The Hon. Sec. would be glad if members would remember 
to give notice to him of any change of address, and if 
members who have changed their address during the year 
without giving any notification would give such notification 
at once. 



TRICYCLES AND BICYCLES. 

Ifc is satisfactory to notice the progress which the tricycle 
is making among those who delight in strange modes of 
locomotion. If the vehicle with three wheels should re- 
place that with two, there will be cause to rejoice in the 
change .of fashion. Not only is the larger carriage less 
likely to inflict injury on pedestrians, there is smaller risk 
of accident to* the rider himself. Apart from the special 
dangers which have been shown to attend the habitual use 
of the bicycle, there is the effect of the perpetual vibration 
which seems inseparable from the apparatus, and which is 
communicated directly to the spinal column. How con- 
siderable this vibration really is may be observed by any 
one who will take the pains to watch the movements of the 
rider of a bicycle closely, say fron^ a carriage travelling in 
the same direction. In the tricycle the motion is not either 
so great or so directly propagated as in the bicycle, while 
the leg action is as good, and the seat is comparatively safe, 
and admits of a change of position at will. Tricycles are 
now made so light and elegant in form that nothing but 
the love of danger can prevent the three-wheeled vehicle 
taking the place of the modernised hobby-horse with 
two. — 1%0 Lancet 



A DAY IN JERSEY. 



I had arranged to meet Mr. A. H. Eoch on Monday the 
16th September at Southampton, in time to catch the six 
o'clock boat for St. Malo, and had intended to ride a good 
part of the way down, but a strong south-west gale frus- 
trated the ride, so I was obliged to have recourse to the 
train. Riding firom Hampstead across London to Waterloo, 
I found the streets so exceptionally greasy that, put it on 
as furiously as I could, I only managed to arrive at that 
station just in time to miss the train. Your readers can 
imagine my frame of mind. On looking at a time-table a 
bright idea struck me — I would go to Jersey by the mid- 
night boat, and thence on to St. Malo; by so doing I 
should arrive in France a day before Mr. H. Jennings, who 
was to follow us by the next boat. A telegram to Koch 
soon apprised him of my movements, and ton o'clock saw 
us both comfortably berthed on board the mail-boat Diana. 
Koch had had a very expensive lunch at "Radley's Hotel," 
just opposite the station, and he wishes to warn anyone 
from setting foot there. At " Kelway's," close by, we had 
an excellent tea, with abundance of good steak, ete., for 
2s 6d each. I don't think riders could do better elsewhere, 
and the people were wonderfully civil to us. Of course we 
had a rough passage to Guernsey, where we arrived at 
9 a.m. This was our first glimpse of the Channel Islands, 
and it certainly looked very inviting, but we had not 
time to go on shore. Thence to Jersey was worst 
of all for those who don't like a good roll, but the 
weather overhead was glorious, and we immensely enjoyed 



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LONDON BICYCLE CLUB GAZETTE. 



the sight of the rocky Jersey coast, but above all the 
huge waves beating over the great Corbifere Point, aud 
falling over again in endless masses of foam. St. Heliers, 
from the sea, also looks very well with its fine harbour and 
quays, and one almost wonders how the steamer can get in 
without touching one or other of the many rocks scattered 
about. On landing at 11 o'clock, we rode along the quay 
into the town, some of the streets of which are paved, and 
up to the " York Hotel." After lunch we bought a map 
of the island, and, without our luggage bags, started for a 
ride. The good people of Jersey evidently thought us 
a curiosity, and so did also some of the horses, but this 
is not, of course, to be wondered at. Steering first of all 
for the quay, we turned to the right on reaching it, and 
rode along a level macadam road for about four miles to 
St. Aubin, a rough piece, certainly. Here we left the sea 
and encountered our first hill, a not very steep one, and 
with a fine surface, but the first part proved too much for 
us ; the remainder, being beautifully engineered, was easily 
ridden. At the top we stopped a little while to enjoy the 
fine view of sea and rocks, and then bowled along a fair 
and nearly level road for some ^ay towards Le Marais, 
on either side of us being mostly bare country, with a great 
deal of furze, etc., and here and there a tree or two. Our 
map of the island was on a large scale, but still there 
seemed such a quantity of cross roads and lanes not marked 
on it, and with np signposts whatever at the corners, that 
we several times quite lost ourselves. Just past La Corbi^re 
Point, the road drops down very suddenly to the sands, 
and not only is it steep, but half-way down there is an 
extremely sharp turn to the right which requires very 
careful riding, and on no account should it be attempted 
legs up till you are round this bad comer. The rest 
of the hill was flown, and then we found ourselves 
close to the sea, the road a fair one, following the 
shore for some two or three miles to L'Etac. Men of 
mongrel species, Jerse3rites of course, were busy carting 
the seaweed all along the sands, and they apparently 
understood neither French nor English for they were a long 
while before they would give us room to go by. We turned 
inland again just before L'Etac, and rode up a stiff hill 
with the wind at our backs. Arrived on high ground again 
we found really good smooth roads and prettier country, 
the latter rather more cultivated than before. The next 
place made for was St. Peter's Mill (marked on the map 
but we never saw it), and then I think Trinity Church ; the 
roads all about here were really very good. I cannot say, 
however, that we noticed any special feature in the country, 
nor was there anything in the way of view ; we had of 
course long ago left the sea at L'Etac. From Trinity 
Church, the only place on the map that we could ask for, 
seemed to be St. John's Church, but whether we arrived 
there by the main road or went a roundabout way to it 
through a maze of lanes, we could not for the life of us 



make put At this point we might have still kept straight 
on and eventually made the tour, so to speak, of the whole 
island, but time wouldn't allow it, so we turned to the 
right at the church and made straight for home. I believe 
this bit is exactly three miles and nearly all a gentle down- 
hill, the last mile being more rapide, as the French say. 
There were milestones here for a wonder. We had a long 
stretch of the town to ride through, and the bicycles 
evidently astonished the inhabitants immensely. It cannot, 
I suppose, be said that we saw much of the beauties of 
Jersey, viz., rocks, glens, caves, dells, etc., but still we rode 
over a good bit of the island and agreed on the whole that 
lye did not think much of it. The roads are certainly very 
fair and it would be well worth while to take a bicycle 
there if one is going to stay for some days. We both 
remarked that though there were a quantity of the well- 
known cars on the quay, yet we did not meet a single one 
during our ride. Distance ridden 24 miles. Of course we 
saw the celebrated cabbages growing in the fields. They 
gave us a grand dinner at the ''York," and altogether 
treated us very well, our bill too was most moderate. Some 
of the people staying there were " quite characters," and 
we were all in fits of laughter at the talking which went on 
during dinner. In the evening we strolled about the 
town and looked into the shops, etc., then early to bed, and 
next morning after a hurried breakfast we left at 7 o'clock 
by the boat for St. Malo. Norman B. Mo&ris. 



DOUBLE ACROSTIC. 

1. 
I hoard my wealth, I never lend. 
And wish I never had to spend. 

2. 
No sadder word, when from the heart 
'Tis said, by friends about to part. 

3. 
A monstrous bird in Arab fable ; 
To tell my name you'll sure be able. 

4. 
I grow far o£f, on Indian shores, 
A&d make good ships, or wooden floors. 

5. 
In winter there's a good old sport 
Which without me must come to nought. 

6. 
A General who, in '43, 
In Scinde won a great victory. 

Te racing men, who try to find 
My whole, 'tis one of you. 
And one to whom all will allow 
The Club's best thanks are due. 



M 



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OFFICIAL. 

In order that the report of Club doings for this year may 
be as complete as possible, I shall feel greatly obliged if 
members .will send me the outlines of any interesting tonrs 
taken by them daring the year, written as concisely as 
possible. All those who have, daring the year, ridden over 
100 miles in one day should send me the date, and a few 
particulars of the ride or rides. 

To guard against mistakes in newspaper reports and 
omissions, every member who has been successful in racing 
would greatly assist me by giving the date, place, sports, 
and prize (whether first, second, or third), of every race in 
which he has gained a place. 

District Captains should send in their reports of Club 
Meets early. 

The compiling of such a report as the Committee wish 
to place before Members is a task occupying a considerable 
amount of time, and in order that it may not have to be 
harried, Members should endeavour to send me the required 
information during the ensuing week. 

M. D. BilOEBB, Jun., Captain. 
Oakleigh, Croydon. 



We were rather surprised the. other day to learn that one 
or two members had missed coming to the Club Dinner 
through ignorance of the date. The explanation seems to 
be that members forget that the Gazbttb is now (save in 
exceptional instances) the sole means employed for com- 
munication between the Club and its Committee. 

We never deluded ourselves into the expectation that 
every man would read the Qazettb, but we must impress 
upon members this fact, that in nearly every issue there 
is some official announcement calling for the attention of 
the Club at large. 



L.B.a ORCHESTRAL SOCIETY. 

To tie Editors of the London Bicycle Club Gazette. 

Deab Sibs, — Referring to my letter on this subject in 
your last issue, and to which I would draw the attention of 
any musical member who has not seen it, I should like to 
state that up to the present a very small number of replies 
have been received, viz., two violins, a comet, piano, and 
two flutes. There are, I am sure, many more violin players 
in the club, and if some of these will drop me a line, as 
also any who play the viola or cello, we shall then have 
sufficient material to start with, and a meeting can be 



called without further delay. Will anyone who sees this 
kindly draw the attention of any eligible members he 
knows to the matter, as it may not have come to their 
notice ? — ^Yours truly, 

Frank Jollt. 
37, Downs Road, Clapton, 

26th November, 1878. 



To tlte Editors of the London Bicycle Club Gazette. 

Dear Sms, — ^Being a constant reader of the Oazetts, 
I lighted with much satisfaction upon Mr. Jolly's letter in 
our last publication. The idea is a capital one, and would 
be an excellent thing for our Club, which is certainly 
rather behindhand in sociability at present. 

We have nothing but our annual dinner, which, though 
of course very jolly in its way, is not the same thing as an 
entertainment favoured by the ladies. If it is impossible 
to give a ball (and many of us never saw why the last 
attempt fell through), could not the different Districts give 
entertainments through the winter, to which members 
could bring their "sisters, their cousins, and their aunts Y' 

The musical evenings proposed by Mr. Jolly would be 
very delightful, and when the L.B.C. Orchestral Society is 
in full swing, say about February, why not give a concert ? 
And invite the ladies to help ! It would be a grand success, 
you may be quite sure. — Hoping you will pardon me for 
having taken up so much of your valuable space (that is, 
if Fm lucky enough to get printed), I am, dear Sirs, 
faithfully yours, 

A Social One. 

[Please send your name. — ^Ed.] 



ANSWERS TO CORRESPONDENTS. 

M. — ^P.0.0. received with thanks. A little in excess of 

required amount. 
R. H. S.— You have omitted the word " alone," after " to 

members." This makes all the difference. 
C. W. N. — I cannot insert your letter now, but will bring 

it before the next Committee. 



NOTICE TO CORRESPONDENTS. 

All contributions must be addressed to " The Editors, 
L.B.C. Qazettb, 35, Eastcheap, E.C.," and must bear the 
name of the author, though not necessarily for insertion. 

They must be written on one side of the paper only, 
and, if immediate insertion is desired, must be received not 
later than Tuesday morning. 



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LONDON BICYCLE CLUB GAZETTE. 



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Offered FREE to Officers of aU Clubs to arrange Matches, 
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repairs and never get out of order, and are strongly recommended by 
Members of the London Bicycle Club, and by all who have used them. 
Weight of machine, from 40 lb. or from 1 lb. per inch. 

City Affent: GOT, 21. LeadenhaU Slareet. „ 
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Prospectus Id., with Photo. 3d. All sizes kept in stock ready for delivery. 

T. A. SMILY, DALSTON JUNCTION, LONDON, 

BICYCLE AGENT, AND 

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Specially adapted for Travellers (commercial and others) and Tourists. 

Price Lists of these and other Bicycles, post free. 
Photos of "Traveller " No. 1 Bicycle, and of John Keen, post free en 
application^ 



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CHAMPION OBNAMENTAL BIDEB. 



THE EMPRESS 

Is acknowledged as the best Eoadster. Strong, durable, and easy run- 
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of London Bicycle and other Clubs. 

Sole Agent: T. A SM ILY, DA LSTON JUHCTIOH, E. 

THE NORWOOD. 

A newly-designed light Eoadster. A very elegant machine. Will 
stand plenty of work. Weight of 52-inch, 40 lb. City Agent :— 



/ 21, LEADENHALL STREET, ) r^ ^C 

\ 54, LIME STREET , | liOKDON, Ji.u 

W. KEEN, Empress Bicycle Works, Korwood Junction, S.E. 
Price Lists, One Stamp. 






IF 



Ten Irish to purehaw • new blcrelej 
Toa vlah to poreluM • noond-hjuid Mejrek; 
Ton Willi to Mil • Ucyolc ; 
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Repairs promptly executed by competent Workmen. 

GHA.RGEB MODSBATE. 

BICYCLE SUNDRIES OF EVERY DESCRIPTION. 



Price Lists on Application. 

Within three minutes' walk qf Edgware Road, Praed Street 

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Printed for the Proprietors by Darling & Son, at the Minerva Steam 
Printing Office, 35, Eastcheap, London, E.C. — ^December 5, 187&. 



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u 

" Tengage done taus ct 4biter dans leurs ecriis touts personnalit^, toute allusion dSjpassant les limites de la discussion la 

plus sincere et la plus courtoise." — Laboulbene. 



Vol. I. No. 33.] 



[Thursday, Dbokmber 19, 1878. 



CONTENTS. 



Official Notices 226 

L.B.C. Orcheatral Society .". 226 

A Few Days in England and Wales '. 226 

Western District Meetings 228 



PAGE 

Brittany 228 

Answer to Double Acrostic '. 280 

Correspondence « 230 

Notice to Correspondents 231 



OFFICIAL. 

At a Committee meeting held on Tuesday the 10th inst., 
the resignations of Mr. C. Groom and Mr. J. S. Ford 
were accepted. 

It was decided that members should be invited to con- 
tribute a sum not exceeding five shillings each to meet the 
expenses of the Gazette for the past year. 

At a Committee Meeting held on Tuesday, the 17th 
instant, it was decided to nominate the following gentlemen 
for election as officers of the Club for the ensuing year : — 

President ... Hon. Ion Keith-Falconer. 

Captain ... ,.. M. D. Riicker, Jun. 

Treasueee ... F. Godlee. 

Hon. Sec. ... H. R. Boyce. 

District Captains. 

NX—Y. Godlee. N. TT.— P. Dalton. 

IF.— W. A. Smith. 

8, TT.— R. G. TroUope. /S.il— The Committee Are not 

yet prepared with their 
nominations. 

Committee. 
N.E. — E, H. Barrett and F. Jolly. 
N,W. — J. W. Alison and R. Newman. 
W, —A. H. Koch and C. W. Nairn. 
S, W, — 6. P. Coleman and H. Jennings. 
8,E. — The Committee are not yet prepared 
with their nominations. 
And also Messrs. A. 0. Ward and J. Scott Stokes, 
Editors L.B.C. Gazette. 



The resignations of Messrs. R. Walmesley, H. J. Hunter, 
and E. Tegetmeier were accepted. 

At a meeting of the. Committee held on the 
9th September, 1878, it was decided to recommend the 
next General Meeting to pass the following Rule : — 

" That either the proposer or seconder of a candidate for election 
should attend at a Committee "Meeting when the name of such candi- 
date comes up for election, and that if neither of them can so attend, 
then that one or other of them should introduce the candidate to some 
member of the Committee, who must either be present at such meeting 
as aforesaid, or submit a written report to be read thereat." 

Members will notice with regret that Mr. R. Walmesley 
has resigned his membership of .the Club. Mr. Wabnesley's 
future address is the Monmouth Steam Brewery, Monmouth, 
and he has written to say that he will be always happy to 
see or give any assistance or directions to members 
travelling in his neighbourhood. 



It will be seen from the '* official " column that a " bene- 
volence " of 5s. a-head is requested from each member on 
account of the Gazette. Of course there is not the slightest 
compulsion about this call, and any less sum will be gladly 
received. As hinted at starting, the Gazette must cost 
the Club a considerable amount, and this has proved the 
case, although a certain amount has been sayed in circulars 
and their printing. 

It is for members to resolve whether they are so satisfied 
with the paper as to contribute to the fund. 

I shall be glad to receive subscriptions, either in stamps 



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226 



LONDON BICYCLE CLUB GAZETTE. 



or P.O. Orders on the chief office, or members may hand 
over their contributions to any member of Committee. 

Acknowledgment will be made in the next issue of the 
Gazette. 

It would be a convenience to get in all amounts this year 
if possible. 

Francis Godleb, Treasurer. 

The following sums are already contributed : — 

s. d. 

The Committee 5 each 

F. Williams 5 

E. P. Curtis 5 

J. Kinder 5 

Forbes Byers 5 

Address P. Godlee, Walthamstow, Essex. 



L.B.C. ORCHESTRAL SOCIETY. 

A special meeting will be held at No. 47, Finsbury 
Circus, E.C., on Monday evening, 23rd December, at six 
o'clock precisely, to discuss the advisability of starting the 
L.B.C. Orchestral Society. It is particularly requested 
that any member who, takes an interest in this matter will 
make an effort to be present at this meeting. 

Frank Jolly. 

16th Deer., 1878. 

[Mr. Jolly's scheme deserves the attention of members. 
He writes word that he has secured the services of the 
following instruments : — 2 first violins, 1 second violin, 
2 flutes, 1 comet, 1 double bass, 1 piano. Surely a very 
fair start. We recommend taembers most strongly to 
attend the meeting called for tl\e discussion of some plan 
of action.] 

= / 

A FEW DAYS IN ENGLAND AND WALES. 

I had arranged early in the year to spend my holiday 
on my bicycle with my brother, but for a variety of reasons 
we were unable to get away as early as we should have 
liked, and therefore did not get that sine qud non of 
bicycling enjoyment, " perfect weather ;" but taking it as 
a whole, the trip was very enjoyable. One of our reso- 
lutions before starting was that the bicycle was to be 
subservient to our enjoyment, and not, as is the case 
with so many riders, our enjoyment subservient to the 
bicycle, and so the amount of ground we covered will not 
seem very wonderful to super-energetic riders, as we always 
stopped to eujoy the views, chat to the country people, 
and blow a fragrant cloud when we felt so disposed. 
However, to commence — 

We left Kingston Hill about half-post one on Thursday, 
August 15th, having spent the morning in packing up and 
making final arrangements, and following the well-known 
road, stopped for a moment to pay the inevitable call at 
."The Talbot," and arrived in due course at Guildford. 



By the by, how^is it that bicyclists take such a long time to 
find out that the unpleasant hill in the High Street is so 
easily avoided? It is always a stiff hill at the best of 
times, and is often rendered dangerous by the traffic and 
the slipperiness of the large granite boulders with which it 
is paved, whereaa by turning to the right at the top of the 
town and going down North Street, one has a perfectly 
rideable road, both up and down, and with a very much 
better surface. We dismounted at the station, as the wind 
was blowing rather strong against us, and settled down for 
a quiet wiJk up. I was not sorry that we did so, for 
although I had been up the hill on to the Hogsback before, 
I had always ridden up, and had never realised what a 
magnificent view of Guildford and the surrounding country 
one gets as you ascend the hill. The surface was beautiful, 
and we mounted some time before getting to the top, and 
had a very pleasant ride, although against a strong wind to 
Farnham (" Bush Inn "). Here we had tea, and the wind 
dropping, we flew on to Alton, over the most perfect roads 
I ever experienced.' We put up at the "Swan," which we 
found good and reasonable. 

The next morning, after breakfast, not fancying starting 
in the rain, of which there had been a good deal during 
the night, we pottered about some time, and when we 
did make a start we got no further than Ropeley before 
the rain came down again, but, fortunately, we managed 
to get refuge in a bam, thereby saving ourselves a 
thorough wetting.. We stopped in the bam for upwards 
of an hour, the rain coming down all the time in buckets- 
full. We were very much surprised to find how good 
the roads were, although it had been raining hard all 
night. As soon as the rain stopped we made another start, 
but got no further than Bishop's Sutton when down it 
came again. We took refuge in a "pub.," and filled up 
the time by eating bread and cheese. The rain lasted above 
an hour, and when it stopped we mounted again, but the 
fates were against us, for we got no further than Alresford, 
where we again had to take refuge for the best part of an 
hour, the roads, of course, being none the better for the 
rain, but still perfectly rideable, even up hill. It was quite 
evident, then, that we should get no further than 
Winchester that night, and for that place we started as 
soon as it cleared up, and only experienced one little shower 
during tte rest of the journey. There was some difficulty 
in finding out the best way to go, as there are two roads, 
an upper and lower; but, from a hint thrown out, we 
fancied the lower road would be very heavy going, so we 
preferred to tackle the one over the hills, a road which, I 
should think, would be very pleasant under favourable 
circumstances, but, unfortunately, the wind, which had 
been against us all day, now blew a perfect hurricane, so 
we were much relieved when we eventually drew up at the 
" George " (good and reasonable), and resigned our steeds 
to the ostler till the next day. However, a cold bath and 



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LONDON BICYCLE CLUB GAZETTE. 



227 



a cbaDge put a rosier complexion on matters, and having 
ordered dinner, we went for a stroll round the town. After 
dinner we went for another stroll, and, looking into the 
smoking-room before going to bed, we amused ourselves by 
finding out the meaning of the following, which was hung 
up over the fire-place, and which I give verbatim, or 
rather literatim, for the amusement of the readers of 
the L.B.C.G. :— 

The Landlord's Invitation. 
Heres' to Pa ! nds Pen Da S. 
Ocl alh Ou Rin ha' R. M 
Les Smir T Ha ! N. D. F u nle T fr ; 
i Ends H I P R E ignB eju, S T, an 
dkin, dan Devil spe, AK of N, One. 
N.B. — No teaching one another to read the above under 
forfeiture of a bottle of the landlord's ^rine. 

The next day (Saturday) after breakfast (N.B. They 
roast their own coffee here, and remarkably good it is), we 
started with the intention of reaching Bournemouth some 
time that afternoon. We walked up the hill out of the town, 
and, mounting at the top, had a glorious ride over perfect 
roads, througb the villages of Hursley and Armfield to 
Rbmsey ; this was one of the most enjoyable rides we had, 
the roads and the country being both perfect, and the wind, 
although it was against us, was of no inconvenience, as the 
woods through which we were riding kept off the greater 
part of it. At Romsey we stopped for a little while, and 
went over the abbey, and from there to the commencement 
of the New For&st it was still £^11 violets ; but here our 
troubles began, and all the way to Ringwood it was very 
bad, the road being dreadfully cut up and in places unride- 
able, and the wind a stiff nose-ender ; there we had lunch 
at the " White Hart," which, by the by, is the only original 
"White Hart," all ethers being spurious imitations. The 
story is that King Henry VHL, with Philip, Archduke of 
Spain, was hunting in the neighbourhood, and after a good 
run they ran inta a white hart close.by ; the ladies, who were 
evidently well up, begged the pretty creature's life, which 
w^fl spared, and the hotel changed its sign to that of the 
" White Hart," in memory of the run and the deliverance 
of the hunted animal. So says the Bailli — I mean the 
story. Prom here it was all splendid going to Chrl^church. 
We stopped there some little while, and went over the 
church and to the top of the tower, which well repays a 
visit, the view from it being magnificent. From Christ- 
church to Bournemouth the wind was something beyond a 
joke, but, fortunately, it was no great distance, and we 
arrived there safely, and after inquiry, settled upon putting 
up at the " London," a small place, the fare and the charges 
being both moderate ; we enjoyed a bathe before dinner, 
and also the luxury of our portmanteaus, which had been 
sent down by train. I am sorry to say that this was the 
only occasion on which we did see our portmanteau, for it 
took such a long time travelling after us tliat, in despair 



at its non-arrival after two attempts and much telegraphy, 
I left word that when it did come it should be sent back 
home again, at which place it arrived after due deliberatioil. 
For the rest of the journey we contented ourselves with 
what we could carry in our M.LP. bags, and capital 
things they are when you have had them taken to 
pieces and sewn up again properly, and new buckles and 
straps securely fastened and sufficiently strong to stand 
more than looking at without breaking. I have had two 
multums from different makers, and I must say the work- 
manship of both is simply disgraceful, the stitches breaking 
with the slightest strain, and the buckles and straps 
being utterly untrustworthy. The wooden clip, too, is 
generally of the most fragile description. Talking of the 
wooden clip, I have improved upon anything that is out 
now ; at least I have to my own satisfaction. My plan is 
to get two strong pieces of oak, one of which is riveted fast 
on to the bag in the proper place, and has a groove cut to 
fit the spring of your own bicycle, not anybody's and every- 
body's. From out this piece of wood stick two screws, 
one on each side of the spring, like the screws of a saddle. 
The second piece of oak, which has two holes in it, through 
which the two screws above-mentioned protrude, is then 
held fast by a couple of nuts, made to screw up with a 
spanner, or with your finger and thumb. It takes about 
two minutes longer fastening on and taking off, but you 
are amply repaid for your trouble by the rigid way in 
which the bag sits on the machine, instead of wobbling 
about first on one side and then another. Mine carried 
everything I wanted, that is to say, a change of everything, 
except shoes and coat, and although I have done twice 
without them, I don't mean to do so again, 83 they can be 
carried on the handles without inconvenience. 

Sunday we spent in the most orthodox fashion, though 
I must own it was so hot that we came out before the 
sermon and went on to the pier, where we met two friends. 
We abandoned ourselves to laziness for the rest of the 
day, and fixed the next days' journey for Weymouth, our 
friends agreeing to meet us there in their yacht. On the 
morrow, after a bathe and breakfast, we started and found 
the road to Poole simply atrocious ; it improved between 
there and Wareham, to which place we were induced to 
go out of our way to see Corfe Castle. I suppose it waa 
very nice, but there seems to me to bo a great deal ol 
sameness about ruins, and the road was of the bumpiest 
description. From Wareham to Weymouth the surface 
was very fair, the road being through Wool Winfrith to 
Warmwell Cross, where you turn sharp to the left. There 
is a long hill about two miles before you get to Weymouth 
which requires great caution. We got to Weymouth about 
three, and put up at the " Victoria and Great Western," 
which I can strongly recommend. Our friends did not turn 
up for a long time, so we took a boat and went out to meet 
them. The wind having dropped, they had taken about 



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228 



LONDON BICYCLE CLUB GAZETTK 



five hours doing as many miles. We rowed about the 
harbour and bay with them for a little while, and then 
dined, had a stroll, and went to bed. 

Argete, LB.C. 

(To be continued,) 



Westeen District. 

Tlie first social evening at the ''Warrington Hotel" 
was held on Saturday last, the 14th December. About 
eighteen members and friends were present, including 
Messrs. Alison, W, A. Smith, and Thorn, and had it 
not been for the rival attraction of skating, and for 
the fact of the meeting in the S.E. Division occurring 
on the same day, it is believed that a still larger 
number would have turned up. The meeting passed off 
very successfully. Many of those present were good 
vocalists, and they and Mr. A. Henry, who presided at the 
piano, contributed greatly to the evening's enjoyment. 
The room is a very comfortable one, and the " Warrington " 
being much more convenient and easy of access than " Jack 
Straw's Castle," all present were agreed that the change 
of locality was a move in the right direction. The next 
meeting will take place on Saturday, the 28th inst., at 
6 p.m. The "Warrington" is at the N.E. comer of 
Warrington Crescent, about ten minutes' walk from Bishop's 
Road or Edgware Road Stations, and rather less from 
St. John's Wood Road Station. Eilburn 'buses pass the 
end of Stranraer Place, within two minutes' walk. 



The social evening at " The Warrington," Maida Vale, 
on Saturday the 28th inst., will, after tea, be for a short 
time made into a special meeting " to consider the existing 
position of the Western District, and the question of its 
representation on the Committee." ' All members are 
earnestly requested to attend if possible. 

W. A. Smith, Dist Capt. 



BRITTANY. 



St Malo to Dinan, Lamballe, St. Brieuc, Guingamp, 
Paimpol, Tr^guier, Lannion, Morlaix, St. Pol de Uon, 
Jtoscoff, Landivisian, Landemeau, Brest, Orozon, 
Douamenez, Qpimper, Concameau, QuimperU, Lorient, 
Auray, Camac, Vannes, Floermel, Bennes, Dol, and 
St. Malo. 

Sept. 18. The passage of three hours from Jersey to 
St. Malo should be an enjoyable one, but as it was pouring 
the whole time and excessively cold, we were not sorry to 
see the town come into sight and have the trip over. The 
fare for bicycles was 28. 6d. each. This service, a tidal one 
of course, is poor comparatively with other parts of the 
South- Western system, and the boat is a slow one. The 
entrance into St. Malo is, in my opinion, a most delightful 
one ; there are rocks sticking up here and there, as though 



they would almost defy you to pass them, and when still 
closer in, you see in front of you St. Servan, to the right 
Dihard, and on the left St. Malo, surrounded with its fortified 
wails and ramparts. We landed in a torrent of rain, got 
through the customs easily and rushed off to the rolling bridge 
which takes you over to the other side of the harbour, and 
saves a long walk round. From the bridge to the '' Hotel 
de rUnion " in St. Servan, our quarters for the day, was 
only a short walk. Our clothes changed, and a heavy 
ei^'^z^n^ polished off, we soon made ourselves comfortable 
in the drawing room, which, as well as the dining room, 
looks out on the sea and the R. Ranche. As the rain 
would not stop, we decided to remain there till next 
morning, when Mr. H. Jennings was to arrive by the 
Southampton boat, and then we could all three start from 
scratch. By three o'clock the floods ceased, so we in- 
spected St. Servan, bought a small French guide book and 
a map, etc., and then walked over, via the bridge again, to 
St. Malo. There did not appear to be much to see here 
beyond a few public buildings and very narrow streets ; we 
therefore made for the fortifications, and down on to the 
sands. A good walk along the latter, which, by the bye, 
are wonderfully smooth, together with a good blow of the 
briny, gave us a wonderful appetite for our table d'h6te, 
which we returned in time for at the hotel. 

September 19. St. Servan to Dinan. After breakfast, 
or rather " c€if(f compM" we spent the early part of the 
morning sauntering about the quays and sands of St. Malo, 
while waiting for the southern boat to come in. On its arrival 
with Jennings, we adjourned to the " Union " for d^euner, 
and then started at once for Dinan. St. Servan is, of 
course, paved. On mounting at the end of the stones, an 
old lady, seeing the writer leading the way, with a silver- 
plated regulation bugle slung on his back, exclaimed 
*' Ah regards done, celui qui porte le trompette, c*est Is 
Capitaine ! Of course ever after that I was known as captain, 
Jennings lieutenant, and Koch sub-lieutenant. Up to the 
first village the road was level though rough, but ever after 
that it seemed very hilly and rough ; a few of the hills we 
only managed with difiiculty or did not ride up at all. 
The country round seemed pretty and wild, blackberries, 
enormous ones too, caused several halts. The small, town 
of Ch&teauneuf was passed through at 11 kilometres, and 
farther on a long grind up a stiff hill brought us into Fleu- 
dihen (18 kilometres), where the church lately built or 
restored stands up so conspicuously that it serves as a land- 
mark for miles round. There is a good run down after this 
town. About 6 kilometres further on, the road joins 
the Dol-Dinan road, and one must here keep to the 
right. Two or three kilometres farther on, a fine, long 
winding descent begins, which brings you suddenly into the 
lovely valley of the Ranche. Dinan is on the opposite side. 
Over a fine bridge, and up a stiff hill, the town is at last 
reached (11 kilometres). The rest of the afternoon was 



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spent in exploring the town, the River Ranche (over which 
there is a splendid bridge), and enjoying the magnificent 
view of the valley and surrounding country from the 
ramparts on the Place du Guesclin. There is nothing 
much to see in the church of St. Sauveur. In one of the 
narrow streets which leads from the town down to the 
river there are some very interesting old houses. We had 
to take shelter here from a heavy storm of rain for half an 
hour. I think it is the Rue de Jerzual. It was market- 
day here, and the streets, especially after the wet, were in 
a dreadful state. Our hotel, the '" Commerce," I can, I 
think, only call fair, but then it must be remembered that 
Dinan is quite an English place. Distance to-day, 18 miles 
good. 

September 20th. Dinan to Lamballe and St. Brieuc. 
By 9 o'clock this morning we got under weigh, not in the 
least deterred by the heavy rain which had fallen at early 
morn and while having breakfast. Just out of the town 
we encountered a long hill up, the road was hard, notwith- 
standing the wet, and very fair; for^ few kilometres 
undulating, afterwards pretty level, with a first-rate surface. 
We were very pleased with the country, it was so beautifully 
wild, being mostly furze and heath, glorious views for miles 
round, especially on the left. The weather, unfortunately, 
was also apt to make us rather " wild," for every now and 
then the rain would come down so suddenly that we had 
to rush for the nearest shelter, or should have been drenched 
in no time. The road itself appeared to be made of a sort of 
good white macadam, hard, though so wet. A nice winding 
descent of two kilometres (legs up) brought us into the 
very pretty valley in which is Jugon (22 kilometres). On 
the other side of the valley a like ascent caused a dismount. 
From here the road continued much the same, with the 
exception of a sharp, short run down (at 34th kilometre 
stone) to under a railway bridge and up again. A slight 
descent leads into Lamballe, built, of course, in a valley. 
At the "Hotel de France" we had an excellent lunch, 
composed of six dishes, followed by cheese and dessei *■. for 
the usual charge of 2 j francs. The " patron " was very 
attentive and polite. Lamballe (17 kilometres). Leaving 
this town we had an inferior road to run on. It was lumpy 
and rutty at sides ; this, together with a head wind, caused 
the pace to be slow. There were also some good long hills 
one down just at kilometre stone 438 being rather steep. 
Another, 12 kilometres from Lamballe, leading down into 
village of Tffiniac, was about 1^ kilometres long, and 
rather rough. From this dirty bttle place we had to toil 
up a long, rough ascent. It was at least 3 kilometres long, 
and we could only manage to ride the latter part of it 
through a village. Our reward for this grind, when about 
half way up, was a splendid view of the Bay of St. Brieuc, 
with Cap d'Erquy or Cap Frehal to the extreme right. 
Just on entering the town of St. Brieuc (20 kilometres) 
there is a short very sharp descent to a bridge over the 



river Oouet, and the same up again. Our hotel, the " Croix 
Blanche," was only a few yards from the top of this latter 
pitch, and a very good hotel it is too — ^landlord very civil. 
The blackberries by the side of the road to-day have been 
a perfect sight, of course we did not leave them quite 
alone. Country has been pretty. Nothing much^ to see 
in St. Brieuc but numbers of public buildings, very plainly 
built, and some nice old wooden houses, I won't.say how 
' many centuries old. Saw a Breton lamp in the shape of a 
farthing dip, with a paper bag round it, being held by one 
man while the other drove the cart. Distance to-day 37 
miles. 

September 21st. St. Brieuc to Paimpol. On leaving 
the town after breakfast to-day we found a fair road for 4 
or 5 kilometres, and then a splendid long winding descent 
for 2 kilometres into a most lovely wooded valley, over a 
small viaduct, and a corresponding ascent to climb out 
again ; this hill, however, is quite rideable, being well 
engineered. A good undulating road thence to Ch&tel- 
andren, with no hills to speak of. The country all round 
here is wonderfully, pretty, wild in the extreme — ^heath, 
furze, etc., are on all sides, while the road is lined with 
oaks and fern-covered banks. At Chfttelandren (17 kilo- 
metres) we stopped to see the little Church of Notre-Dame- 
du-Tertre, or rather the pictures painted on the ceiling of 
chancel in the fifteenth century. We were intensely amused 
and interested with them ; they represent scenes from the 
early part of the Old Testament, and also the life of some 
patron saint of small interest to us. Adam and Eve, in 
original costume, are especially good. There is also, in a 
small wood cage, the skull of a cur6 who died in 1813. 
Hence to Guingamp, a good undulating road with very 
pretty views, especially at about 7 kilometres from latter 
town, where from the top of a slight slope you see the road 
and country in front of you for miles. From this point it 
is naturally a good deal downhill to Guingamp (13^ kilo- 
metres), say 2 down to 1 up, surface is also good. Market- 
day here again, and of course we created a great commotion. 
Lunch at " H6tel de France," good. Guingamp is a weird 
old town, the chief things to see being the old leaden foun- 
tain in market-place, and opposite it the Church of Notre- 
Dame-de-B. Secours, with a tawdry image famous for 
miracles. The church itself is finely proportioned, with 
good though modern glass. At back of the hotel runs the 
River Le Trieux, and over it a little bridge from which 
there is a lovely view of church, houses, little waterfall, 
etc., quite a picture. Guingamp is of course the origin 
of our word "gingham," and there seemed any amount 
of antiquated umbrellas on the stalls. A long pull up 
when out of town, then toleraby level, though very holey 
and bumpy for a few kilometres, when we had rather 
a sharp run down to the river and up again. Capitaiue 
nearly got upset by a horse in a buggy going down here. 
From this place the chemin, ordinary macadam, improved 



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LONDON BICYCLE CLUB GAZETTE. 



a little and was pretty level, with the exception of a zigzag 
descent for the best part of 2 kilometres into Pontrieux 
(18 kilometres). This is situated in another pretty valley, 
and is a small port pn the Trieux. For 2 or 3 kilometres 
to a village we followed the river, and then turning sharp to 
the right shoved the animals up a nasty steep rough hill for 
about 1^ kilometres, over the worst road yet seen, narrow 
and rutty, quite a Devonshire lane. I believe there must have 
been another and better road from Pontrieux, but only one 
is marked on map. Further on at the next village the sur- 
face improved a little, but soon after came a frightful zigzag 
hill down, with bad comers, for some two kilometres into 
the valley of the Leff. The lieutenant and sub walked 
all this, but the captain, with a Stassen, of course rode it, 
brake jammed hard on, though. The corresponding ascent 
was worse, with pieces of rock sticking up here and there 
on the surface ; every inch was walked by all. Hill after 
hill now followed, some long ones, surface still rough but a 
trifle better, and uncommon glad were we to see the first 
house of Paimpol come into sight (17 kilometres). " Hotel 
Gicquel," ordinary, old Bordeaux, very dear at 4 francs. 
We have had a dose to-day from Pontrieux, and I am glad 
to say no more like it to follow. Weather fine. Distance 

41 miles. 

Norman B. Morris. 

(To be continued,) 



Ye who to foolish prejudice owe thanks for lightened 

purse, 
From his example patience learn, and don't complain or 

curse. 



A bird, dull, stupid, but who dwells apart from mankind's 

reign. 
If nincompoops would dwell likewise, the bench might have 

a gain. 

Around the head of Justice True this shines — and yet I 

hold that 
Some judges' senseless heads can boast no glory but an old 

hat. 

When noodles rave against our sport, like bull by rag made 

frantic. 
This spell perhaps distorts their brain with '' disposition 

antic." 



This implement I'd rather see, than partial Justice' sword, 
Pitching oMi pros and cons by chance to furnish an award. 



Two letters only form this word, yet much it can express. 
As, when some fool fresh folly shows, confirming previous 



When folly sits in Wisdom's seat, my thoughts mark each 

wise face. 
But when the fool is laid in me, Right may regain her place. 



When people their decisions give, opposed to facts most 

clear. 
In the attempt to justify their judgments, I appear. 



If from the magisterial mouth should ever follies fall. 
This word shows which surpass the rest, the crowning ones 
ofaU. 



Should you require a further clue. 

Just read that part of " Pickwick" through 

Where Mr. Nupkins, magistrate, 

Frowns from the Bench, severely great. 

But as to law, quite in the dark. 

Until inspired by his clerk, 

He twice as oft commits himself 

As he commits the luckless elf. 

Who suffers from his judgment ripe : 

Nupkins is our friend's prototype. * A. P. 



Answer to Double Acrostic. 

1. M ise R 

2. A die U 

3. R C 

4. T ea K 

5. I c E 

6. N apie R 

" Martin Rucker." 
Correct answers have been received from Beak, Cyril 
J. Turner, F, des Voeux, N. Carr, E. P. C, M. T. 



If any member of the L.B.C. would like to accompany 
me for a good ride on " Boxing Day," please drop me a 
line as early as convenient, and I will give him particulars 
where to meet me and what time. 

H. C. Webster. 

The Firs, Waltham Abbey, Essex. 



Corrtjepmtbcnxe. 

To the Editors of the London Bicycle Club Gazette. 
Sirs, — No doubt many members will perfectly agree 
with the "Social One's" remarks, but of what avail, unless 
they put their shoulders to the wheel and follow it up. 
The materials are at hand, and consequently the project 
of a concert and dance quite feasible, provided a few 
members will give their energies and a little leisure time. 
Social meetings have been successfully held both in N. W. 
and S.E. districts, and the former have discontinued theirs 
to enable them to attend those to be held at the '* War- 
rington Hotel," as being more central for the general body 
of members. Here, then, with Mr. Jolly's proposed Orches- 



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231 



tral Society are the materials, all ready brought together 
without any trouble, and these fortnightly reunions might 
take the place of rehearsals, although more might be 
requisite. If a committee is formed a hall might be hired, 
Steinway, Victoria, or any other, a concert given and a ball 
follow. If only a few influential members would take it 
up, it cannot fail to be a success in every point. Two at 
least, or even three such entertainments might be given 
during the winter. 

Alfbeb Henbt. 
32, Warwick Road, W., 

London, 9th Dec, 1878. . 



HEAVY MACHINES FOR TOURING. 
To th$ Editors of the London Bicycle Club Gazette. 

Deab Sirs, — ^Living in London, I can speak to the great 
advantages of a heavy thick-tyred (Ij-in.) "Special 
Challenge," which carried me over the road from 
Cheltenham, vid Stroud, to Bath against the S.W. wind of 
Whit-Monday, June 10th, 1878, the day of the race from 
Bath. I met hardly a soul all the way, much less a 
bicyclist. The road was simply awful, as most Whit- 
Monday riders can guess, but the spill I got about six miles 
from Bath started only one nut in the handle (not the 
rudder gear), whereas I can now feel the damage done to 
my right elbow by the same. 

Ride 2 is on August 15th, against another S.W. wind, to 
Winchester, by Basingstoke (one of the fastest roads any- 
where), 66 miles. 

The day following, amid storms and gales, vid Lyndhurst, 
Lymington, Yarmouth, to Freshwater, for luncL Then 
came the tug of war. Just after the fourth storm of the 
day I climbed over the grass to the top of the military 
road from Freshwater to Chale, but had to walk down best 
part of way to the level, when I raced the fifth storm in front 
of the wind along the centre path of the wagon track, 
which now shows the line of the " military road." Between 
the two wheel tracks and the centre, on which I rode, are 
two " banks " of earth covered with grass, while the " ruts " 
are full of loose stones, and on that day resembled, for the 
most part, a series of lakes, or, still better, miniature canals. 
At about 10 p.m. I reached Sandown, and, with the excep- 
tion of the loss of the hind wheel lubricator cap, the 
machine was all right in every respect, and remained so 
until I returned by same route (bar the " military road ") 
to London. I can confidently assert that these two rides 
could not have been undertaken on a light machine with 
the security or comfort that I experienced. 

I've ridden to death during the past ten years one 
learner ("Boneshaker"), one superior "Boneshaker," by 
Michaux, Paris, one 5-in. "Ariel," one 54-in. "Keen," and 
now my 50-in. "Singer" seems game for a long time. 
When loaded she weighed 69 lbs., and we weighed exactly 
2 cwt. together this summer. I also ride with cranks only 



4f inches from centre to centre. Let any of your interested 
readers who are going to increase their stud next season 
ponder on the words of^ dear Sirs, — Yours contentedly, 

"Ibish Challenge." 
London, December 7th, 1878. 



To the Editors of the London Bicycle Club Gazette. 

Gentlbjibn, — As I understand Mr. Jolly's letter to the 
Gazette of November 14th, one of his principal objects in 
proposing a musical society in connection with the L.B.C., 
is to " keep the men together during the winter months." 

Permit me to point out to Mr. Jolly that the members, 
both musical and non-musical, are perfectly unanimous in 
their desire to be kept together ; a desire amply illustrated 
by the "faggots " incident at the annual dinner. Therefore, 
let members rather turn their attention to some means of 
promoting the unity of the entire Club, and the first step 
in this direction should be to acquire a base of operations^ 
a club-room. 

Then we may hope to see " wheels within wheels," and 
the growth of such societies as the one suggested by Mr. 
Jolly will be a natural result. 

Although this matter has been set before you 'on several 
occasions, I am not aware that any practical solution of 
the question has been suggested through the medium of 
the Gazette. A sub-committee was appointed, and no 
doubt their efibrts were praiseworthy, though unsuccessful, 
the real question being beyond their power to deal with, 
viz., a question of expense. 

Already it is evident that the paltry 10s. a-year will not 
suffice even to meet current expenses, incurred principally 
by giving members that now indispensable organ, the 
" L.B.C. Gazette." 

Members will therefore not be surprised to hear that 
they will be askedj to vote for an increase in the annual 
subscription at the next general meeting. Would it be 
possible at the same time to raise the subscription 
sufficently to cover the additional expense of a club-room ? 

This is the question which will virtually decide if we are i 
to have a club-room or not, and as sooner or later some/ 
decision must be arrived at, it is to be hoped members wilk 
take the bull by the horns at the next general meeting, 
aad so assist the endeavours of Mr. Jolly and other 
enthusiastic supporters of the L.B.C. to uphold the prestigas 
of which we are all so proud, — Yours truly, 

A Faggot. 

NOTICE TO CORRESPONDENTS. 

All contributions must be addressed to " The Editors, 
L.B.C. Gazette, 35, Eastcheap, E.C.," and must bear the 
name of the author, though not necessarily for insertion. 

They must be written on one side of the paper only, 
and, if immediate insertion is desired, must be received not 
later than Tuesday morning. 



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LONDON BICYCLE CLUB GAZETTE. 



Gr O 

BICYCLE OUTFIHER, CLUB UNIFORMS, 

AND SUNDRIES. 

PURCHASE 

YOUB 

BICYCLE 

ON 

GOV'S NEW PLAN. 

AH the Best Makes at Manufacturer's Prices. 
By arrangement wUh the Manufacturers orders have the same 
attention as if forwarded direct to the Works, thus saving the buyer 
a deal of trouble. 

IMMEDtATE DELIVERY. 
Write for Particulars and Price Lists, 



TRICYCLES for Ladies or Gentlemen. 
YOUTHS' BICYCLE S. 

GOV'S CLUB ROOM, 



MOST CENTBALLY SITUATED. 



Offered FREE to Officers of all Clubs to arrange Matches, 
Committee Meetings, &c. 



GOY,{2^'^!l3»'JrlSr''}London, E.O. 

PHIVER'S EXQUISITE MANUS ALBA (REGISTERED). 

THE HAVDa—PinTBa'a Mahvb Ajma inraret bcautlftil. wUte» Mft bmdi to all, no matter of what 
oeonpatlon ; a perfect eleanrer of. and comfort to, the skin. THE rEET.— PniTaa'a Uavvb Aima It 
a perfect boon to all wboae feet grow weary tbrovch walking or etandJng lon«. It provea a perfect 
deanaer of, and eomfbrter to, tbe feel. THE HAIR— Pjuraa'a Xaiiv« AaaA U the nioet perfeot 
cleaoier of the hair, remoTCe dandrUT and all impurltlet. 

Bold by all Chemliti and Ferf^inen, In toilet eaaee. at It, !■ 6d, li, li6d, >■ 6d. By Foat la Sd, li M, 
Sa 8d. li iM, aa 9d from the Solo Wholeaale ARant- 

J. MASON, xao, Goldhawk Road, Shepherd's Bosh, London, W. 

V.B.— AU the Toilet Caaea ar« clatant Eleetro-Ftated Oooda, Handaome Preaenti. 
AaaRTa— Goy, SL Leadenhall Street. E.C. : Crooke k Co., 87, Pned-»trrct, W. : Hill * Son, 4, Hay 
market, S.W.; J. liehtcnfeld, Cryatal Palace Baiaar, Osford-ntreet ; J. Butler, 63, Queen'srond, 
St. Jobn'a-wood; Barrow * Co., HiRh-atnrt. Eenalnfton; Howard k Co., Charlea-ttrtet, Hatton* 
BRrden, E.C. ; T. Clare, 70, Ten church -ctreet, EC. : Thiellay't Toilet Club, ChartnK-croaaBUtion; at 
all the Metropolitan Hallway larnCorica; of moat Chemlata. AGEKT8 WAKTED. 

A BOON TO BICYCLISTS. 

BICYCLE RIDING TAUGHT PERFECTLY 

AT THE 

V The largest in London. 

Isingle Lesson, Is. 6d. Perfect Bidingrefuaranteed, lOs. 

Address— CHEQUER YARD, 
OPPOSITE ALDGATE METROPOLITAN STATION, 

ALDGATE HIGH STREET. 
Teacher— Professor T. QUINTON. 

CHAMPION ORNAHKNTAL RIDER. 

THE EMPRESS 

Is acknowledged as the best Eoadster. Strong, durable, and easy run- 
ning. Always gives satisfaction. Strongly recommended by members 
of London Bicycle and other Clubs. 

Sole Agent: T. A SUILTJ)AISTOE JirECTIOE, E. 

THE NORWOOD. 

A newly-designed light Roadster. A very elegant machine. Will 
stand plenty of work. "Weight of 52-inch, 40 lb. City Agent :— 



O 



/ 21, LEADENHALL STREET, ) t^^^^^ pp 
{ 64, LIME STREET, } ^^^^^' ^'^' 



W. KEEK, EmpreflsBicycle Works, Norwood Junction, S.E. 
Price Lists, One Stamp. 



THE BICYCLE OF THE DAY FOR 1878 IS J. STASSEN'S " NONPAREIL" 

The only machine fitted with Screwless Spokes, warranted not to break 
or loosen ; patent eccentric brake easily applied and wonderfully effective ; 
new patent double-coned adjustable steering gear ; best red rubber tyres, 
f rictionless bearings, and all latest improvements. Every bicyclist ought 
to possess our Patent Circular-wheel Valise. These machines are made 
for work, and are the best and cheapest machines, as they require no 
repairs and never get out of order, and are strongly recommended by 
Members of the London Bicycle Club, and by all who have used them. 
Weight of machine, from 40 lb. or from 1 lb. per inch. 

«,,.TrSi*y«AffeJiti,^Y, 21^ leadenhall Street 
FEAKES, Fnnces S treet, Leicester Square, London, W. 

J. STASSEN&SON, 251. EUSTON ROAD, N.W. 

Factory Entrance : BEAUMONT PLACE. ' ■^•"' 

Prospectus Id., with Photo. 3d. All sizes k ept in stock ready for delivery. 

T. A. SMILY, DALSTON JUNCTION, LONDON, 

BICTCLE AGENT, AND 

MANUFACTURER OF THE "TRAVELLER" AND "TOURIST" BICYCLES, 

Sl)ecially adajited for TraveUers (commercial and others) and Tourists. 



Price Lists of these and other Bicycles, post free. 
"*" " " "' 1 Bicycle, and of , 
application* 



Photos of "Traveller" No. 1 Bicycle, and of John Keen, post free on 



IF 



Ton with to purchaa* • new biercle; 
You with to purchaw ft aecoDd-band bierclt: 
You wUh to Mil m bicycle; 
YoD witb to excbange m bicycle; 
You with to obtain nay bicycling tnndry ; 
Yott with to put up at a ixapectablc Hotel; 
You with to Itnow where to eend on your ~ 
You will take adrice you will 
CONSULT 



OR 



ETHERINCTON & CO.'S BICYCUSTS' DIRECTORY GUIDE, AND EXCHANCL 

VOUR THOCSAKO GIVBM AWAY WEEKLY. 
To be obtained at Acetiti, Defott. Ac, or on application to the publiabcn, KtbcriDcton ft Cb . Eait 
.. Temple Cha m ben. W hiteifhart Street, Fleet Street, E.C. 

IMPORTANT TO ALL. 
HAEEISON^S ANTI-COEEOSIVE PASTE, 

for Preventing llust, 6d., Is., and Is. 9d. 

HARBISON'S POLISHING POWDEE 

instantly removes Rust and Corrosion from Metals, and for Polishing 
Glass, 6d., Is., and Is. 9d. (seogadvertisement in "Bicycling Times.") 

Free by post for 8, 14, and 24 stamps, of 

8HIBTCIIFF ft CO., 66, Goldhawk Bead, Shepherds Bush, London W. 



THE 



GREATWESTERN BICYCLE DEPOT, 

87, PKAED STREET, 

PADDINGTON W. 

(Three minutes' ivalkfrom Great Western and Praed Street 

Railway Stations.) 

Proprietors : 

CROOKE & CO., 

AGENTS FOR ALL FIRST-CLASS BICYCLES 
AND TRICYCLES. 



BICYCLES BOUGHT, SOLD, OR EXCHANGED. 

BICYCLES LET ON HIRE. 

Repairs promptly executed by competent Workmen. 

CHARGES MODERATE. 

BICYCLE SUNDRIES OF EVERY DESCRIPTION. 

Price Lists on Application. 

Within three minutes' walk oj Edgware lioad, Praed Street 

(Metropolitan), and Great Western liailiray Statiotis, 
London, 1878. 



Printed for tbe Proprietors by Darling & Son, at the Miner\a Steam 
Printing GflBce, 36, Eastcheap, London, £.C.-^I>ecembei 19, 1878. 



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